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Examples of what you can do with a Literature Degree

CREATIVE WRITING – Compose novels, poetry, nonfiction, plays, and cross-genre works for traditional and digital publishers and performance.  Write screenplays and scripts for broadcast media companies including television, radio, and the movie industry.

EDITING & PUBLISHINGBook Editor: Evaluate manusripts to assess their suitability for publication, and oversee their progress from initial manuscript to completed tome.  Magazine Editor:  Manage the content, tone, and themes of trade magazines, professional journals, hobbyist publications, travel magazines, and more.  Copy Editor/Proofreader: Edit and proofread articles to ensure information is represented accurately, provide research support and maintain house style of all publications. Documentation Specialist: Write and edit user manuals, product information bulletins, and product assembly guides. Participate in systems specification and design. Produce promotional material and advertising copy.

RESEARCHResearch Analyst: Research and writing. Gather, update, verify, and enhance in-house database of financial/technical information; Grant Writing: Research and write grants for public or nonprofit organizations to procure necessary funding for laboratories, public projects, social justice initiatives, governments, and community organizations.

TEACHING - There is a wealth of opportunities in the teaching profession. You could teach elementary, secondary or in higher education.  You can also conduct in-house teaching for employees of universities, corporations, and government enterprises, conduct workshops on behalf of community organizations and libraries, or oversee literacy outreach programs in underserved areas or in prisons or job training programs.  Moveover, many institutions need teachers of English as a second language, and some of our graduates have made careers in this field.

PUBLIC RELATIONS - Outreach and Event Coordination: Research and write copy for corporate publications. Coordinate seminars and public events. Capture corporate vision and communicate it to the media; Public Affairs Representative: Develop and oversee community events, providing organizational and administrative support. Serve as corporate spokesperson. Interface with media. Write and edit corporate newsletters, speeches, and press releases. Manage corporate philanthropy program; Public Relations Specialist: Assist in determining public relations goals and coordinate activities to meet them. Supervise the use of the organization's name and logo. Develop and maintain positive corporate image with the media. Serve as liaison between press and management. Prepare press releases. Write speeches and develop presentations. Write and edit newsletters and other internal communications;

GOVERNMENT - Political Representative or Lobbyist: Work on behalf of a specific constituency or advocate for issues and causes you care about.  Use your facility with language at the local, state or federal level. Speech Writer: Write researched, rhetorically interesting speeches and presentations. Research and compose video scripts, bylined articles, and presentations to senior management. Assist in conceptualization and composition of annual report. Internal Communications: Assist in the design and implement internal communications programs. Create, plan, and implement marketing and PR strategies directed at internal and external audiences.  

COMMUNITY - Public Affairs and Community Relations: Every politician needs to be an excellent communicator, both in writing and speech, and whether you yourself become that politician or serve in a support role as a community liaison, speech writer, or public relations officer, a degree in Literature will give you the skills to convey information clearly, balance competing demands from various constituencies, and craft persuasive written and oratorical communications.  Community Organizer:  Nonprofit groups need leaders and workers who can think strategically about community issues and smoothly interface with members of neighborhood and business orgaizations.  You would also be ideally equipped for work with entities designed to foster arts and verbal communication skills among youth.  Social Work: Using your human, communication, and advocacy skills, work at every level of social work to improve the lives of families, children, immigrant communities, and others who can benefit from the services you can provide or help them access. 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONSU.S./U.N. Envoy: Work on behalf of government and international agencies to foster communication and diplomatic relations among various nations.  Translator: Translate written documents and real-time dialogues from one language to another, to enhance understanding and cooperation among businesses and agencies (such as NASA, the CIA, the military, and the United Nations) whose scope is global and critically dependent on clear and accurate understanding of communications. Interpreter:  Help people to access key services such as health care and education by interpreting documents and conversations it is vital for them to understand.  International Business: Manage operations and logistics for U.S. firms with businesses abroad or international firms with businesses in the U.S.  Consult for import/export corporations, or translate for banking and finance companies, sports organizations, and tourism businesses. Create advertising or public relations materials for international manufacturers, computer and software firms, and retail businesses.

LAW & LEGAL SERVICES - Lawyer: Lay a superior foundation for crafting and interpreting law and legal documents, and for generating pithy and persuasive written and oral arguments.  Paralegal: Draft contracts and agreements; provide litigation support. Perform research and background searches. Create and maintain databases.  Mediator: Hear and assess the arguments and issues separating different parties, weigh their merits and complexities, and endeavor to find fair means for reconciling opposing views.

MEDIA - News Reporter: Writing news reports or articles for print or broadcast; Producer: With additional experience in video, write and develop story boards and scripts, video editing, etc.; Programming: Research, write, and edit scripts for radio, news and feature programs.

MARKETING - Research Analyst: Conduct interviews with consumers and create reports from data to analyze results; Marketing Writer: Technical writing to include brochures and product information sheets; Marketing Creative Assistant: Assist in the design, writing and production of promotional pieces for magazines. Must edit and proofread in creating and executing special events; Marketing Professional: Preparing press releases and promotional letters, assisting sales representatives in a variety of duties related to seminars and trade shows; Create presentations, reports and promotional materials for clients. Provide assistance and business analysis to clients as well as identifying competitive issues and researching the market.

ADVERTISING - Copywriter: Creating, editing, and producing publications including newsletters, ads, brochures, marketing kits, direct response, and scripts for videos and internet; Account Executive: Assist in coordinating all aspects of advertising campaigns. Analyze client goals and identify ads and ad campaigns to meet these goals. Manage development and presentation of ads.

 

 

Did you know?

Each year, the Literature Department offers a 1-unit Senior Seminar (LTEN 192), entitled "Careers for Literature Majors."  The seminar is open to all academic levels, space permitting. 

There is an exciting and wide array of career options for Literature Majors to explore, and students will think systematically about where their own strengths and interests lie for life after college.

We discuss graduate school, gap years, entrepreneurial opportunities, and hear from people who are making good use of their degrees.  Students collaborate with representatives from the Academic Internship Program and Career Services to acquire experiental learning, workshop their resumes and interview skills, and develop a "Career Action Plan." 

What strategies can help you leverage your training to get the edge in the hunt for jobs and advanced studies? Let's check them out!

Careers in Literature

Student Advising:
Undergraduate Advisor
117 Literature Building
Virtual Advising

Director Undergraduate Studies:
Margaret Loose

Career Services Center