UC San Diego SearchMenu
Amos Oz
Renowned Israeli writer and peace activist Amos Oz delivers the Herman Wouk Visiting Lecture
Mandeville auditorium, April 22, 2013
Photo by Dirk Sutro, DAH

Upcoming Events

BINDER LECTURE

For more information, please visit: The James K. Binder Lectureship

INHERITANCE TROUBLE: MIGRANT ARCHIVES OF HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE

Inheritance Trouble: Migrant Archives of Holocaust Remembrance 

Monday, April 23rd 2018 5:30 - 7:00pm

De Certeau Room (Room 155), Literature Building 

How should we think about the transmission of Holocaust memory more than seventy years after the defeat of Nazi Germany? What lessons do the events of the Shoah bear for a moment in which far-right political movements are once again on the rise? In order to address such questions, Michael Rothberg considers immigrants’ engagement with the Holocaust in contemporary Germany. The works of art, literature, and performance that he will discuss model alternative ways of remembering the Nazi genocide in the twenty-first century and suggest possibilities for an ethically and politically engaged memory work.

Dr. Michael Rothberg is professor of English and Comparative Literature and the 1939 Society Samuel Goetz Chair in Holocaust Studies at The University of California, Los Angeles. Professor Rothberg works in the fields of Holocaust studies, trauma and memory studies, critical theory and cultural studies, postcolonial studies, and contemporary literatures. His latest book is Multidirectional Memory: Remembering the Holocaust in the Age of Decolonization (2009), published by Stanford University Press in their “Cultural Memory in the Present” series and forthcoming in French and Polish translations. He is also the author of Traumatic Realism: The Demands of Holocaust Representation (2000), and has co-edited The Holocaust: Theoretical Readings (2003) and Cary Nelson and the Struggle for the University: Poetry, Politics, and the Profession (2009). He is on the Editorial Board of the journals Memory Studies and Studies in American Jewish Literature, and has been a member of the International Academic Advisory Council of the Vienna Wiesenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies (2010-2013) and of the Advisory Group of the AHRC-funded project Translating Freedom (2011- 2012). He is also part of the Network in Transnational Memory Studies and a partner in Mnemonics: Network for Memory Studies.

SPONSORED BY UCSD DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE AND JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAM

Flyer