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Secondary Literature Requirements

All literature majors study a secondary literature -- that is, a literature taught and written in a language other than the language of the primary concentration -- and complete upper-division course work of the second literature in the original language. Courses are offered not only in the literatures themselves but in the theoretical aspects of literature and -- often in cooperation with other departments -- on the relationship of literature to other disciplines such as philosophy, history, sociology, psychology, communication, and linguistics, as well as visual arts, theater, and music.

To fulfill this requirement, students must take three Literature courses (as specified below) taught in a language other than the primary language of the student's major. The lower-division component plus the upper-division component must total three courses in the same language to meet the secondary literature requirement.

The two aspects of this requirement are as follows:

I. THE LOWER DIVISION COMPONENT

The following courses apply to this component of the requirement:

  • ASL 1E (see Linguisitics)
  • English 21, 22, 23, 25, 26, 27, 28, or 29 (any two)
  • French 2B, and 2C or 50
  • German 2B and 2C
  • Greek 2 and 3
  • Hebrew 2 and 3 (see Judaic Studies)
  • Italian 2B and 50
  • Latin 2 and 3
  • Russian 2B and 2C
  • Spanish 50A and 50B or 50C

The number of lower-division courses to be taken will vary, depending on the student's level of preparation in the secondary language.

II. THE UPPER-DIVISION REQUIREMENT

One or more of the required secondary literature courses must be upper-division. Students whose background in their chosen secondary language’s literature is exceptionally strong may fulfill the secondary literature requirement by taking three upper-division classes, thus bypassing the lower-division component.

Student Advising:
Danny Panella
Undergraduate Advisor
117 Literature Building
(858) 534-8681
Virtual Advising

Director Undergraduate Studies:
Margaret Loose
The Department also offers a bilingual major that allows students to do half their coursework in English and half in Spanish: the U.S. Latino/a and Latin American Literatures major.