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Literature Undergraduate Course Descriptions Summer Session 2018


LTAM 140 - TOPICS IN CULTURE AND POLITICS (SSI)
Bodies of Water: Dispossession & Disability
Instructor: Gina di Grazia

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Bodies of Water: Dispossession & Disability repositions water, rather than land, as central to settler colonial & neo-colonial projects. With a focus on the body and lived experience, this course interrogates genealogies of dispossession (from domination to disability) resulting from in/accessible waters—stolen, poisoned, privatized. Bodies of Water: Dispossession & Disability draws from a variety of historical and contemporary texts, including popular culture & film.

#WereAllTheShapeofWater #StolenPoisonedPrivatized #WaterIsLife


LTAM 140 - TOPICS IN CULTURE AND POLITICS (SSI)
Autobiographical Acts
Instructor: Haydee Smith

This course examines the personal and political deployments of 20th-century autobiographical cultural productions. Through close readings of popular personal narratives, students will develop nuanced and critical analyses of how power, representation, and privilege coalesce around axes of oppression.


LTEN 110 - TOPICS: THE RENAISSANCE (SSI)
Negotiating and Performing Desire in Renaissance Drama

Instructor: Melissa Vipperman-Cohen

LTEN110-S1 Flyer Thumbnail This course will explore how early modern plays reflect and construct desire. How does Renaissance drama express or complicate acceptable modes of love, lust, and passion? How do queer individuals, women, or characters of color enact agency through their desire or through others' desire for them? How do we understand early modern sex and sexuality? We will consider these texts both in their global early modern historical contexts as well as through several theoretical lenses (including but not limited to queer, feminist, critical race, and Marxist). We will direct our attention to plays such as William Shakespeare’s  Twelfth Night, Othello, John Webster’s  The Duchess of Malfi, and Thomas Middleton and William Rowley's  The Changeling 

LTEN 110 - TOPICS: THE RENAISSANCE (SSII)
Science in the Renaissance
Instructor: Kailey Giordano

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This course will explore the development of the sciences during the Renaissance. How did writers of this period negotiate the tensions between newer and older forms of knowledge production? What dangers, both real and imagined, did these new forms of knowledge production pose to the people of Renaissance England? How were these new methods pressed into the service of geopolitical and religious agendas? How did the rise of this "New Science" shape the relationship of the sciences to religion? To consider these issues and more, we will examine the scientific writings of Francis Bacon, Galileo Galilei, Margaret Cavendish, Robert Boyle, and Isaac Newton; the poetry of Lucretius, John Donne, and John Milton; the essays of Montaigne; and the drama of William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe, specifically  A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Tempest, and  Doctor Faustus. Assignments will consist of short weekly responses and, in the place of a final exam, one final paper of about 10 pages. 


LTEN 140 - THE BRITISH NOVEL: 1790-1830 (SSI)
Jane Austen in Adaptation

Instructor: Carolin Bottcher

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In this course, we will concentrate on the novels of Jane Austen and their adaptations. How does an adaptation keep its source alive while also creating a new piece of art? In what ways do different types of media influence the style of an adaptation, i.e. a film adaptation of a book for example? What is it about Jane Austen’s novels in particular that makes such a revered source for adaptation? To further understand how adaptations work with their source material, we will be reading several of Austen’s novels, including but not limited to Lady Susan and Pride and Prejudice, literary adaptations like Seth Grahame-Smith’s Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, as well as watching filmic adaptations like Joe Wright’s Pride and Prejudice and Patricia Rozema’s Mansfield Park.    


LTEN 176 - MAJOR AMERICAN WRITERS (SSII)
Allen Ginsberg
Instructor: William O'Brien

Allen Ginsberg blew onto the American literary scene with “Howl” in 1955—and onto the political scene a year later, with the Federal Government’s seizure of the book for obscenity.  Ginsberg continued to write until five days before his death in 1997 and was eventually hailed the leader of the Beat Movement (a title he dismissed), as a major figure in American poetry, and as a recipient of both the National Book Award (for The Fall of America) and L’Ordre des Arts et Lettres in France.

Virtually an institution, Ginsberg remained controversial throughout his 40-year career.  Openly gay, sexually explicit in his writings, a Communist sympathizer, admitted drug user (until discovering meditation), a former ‘madhouse’ inmate, opponent of the Vietnam war, visionary, mystic, Buddhist, critic of American imperialism—and Soviet imperialism too—he was not always liked. Crowned King of the May Day Parade in Communist Czechoslovakia, he was thrown out of Cuba, chanted for peace at the 1968 Democratic Convention, and sought to ‘levitate’ the Pentagon.

Ginsberg revolutionized American poetry—and the way you think about poetry.  Poetry has never been the same since Ginsberg wrote Howl.  He published 15 books of verse and many volumes of essays and journals, and gave thousands of public readings.  He also wrote and recorded songs solo, with Bob Dylan, and with a punk band; he also collaborated on an opera and performances with Philip Glass, and made a video with Glass and Paul McCartney.

Our course will center on Ginsberg’s written poetry, and we will also take into account his recorded poetry, essays, interviews, and music.

We will begin the course by watching The Life and Times of Allen Ginsberg, Jerry Aronson’s excellent film biography.

Everyone should obtain a copy of Collected Poems 1947-1997 (available at the UCSD Bookstore; not to be confused with Selected Poems 1947-1995).

Requirements: attendance with careful preparation, and ten pages of writing throughout the course.


LTEN 180 - CHICANO LITERATURE IN ENGLISH (SSI)
Proposed Instructor: Maria Cesena

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTSP 150B - CONTEMPORARY CHICANO/A-LATINO/A CULTURAL PRODUCTION: 1960 TO PRESENT (SSII)
Proposed Instructor: Melissa Hidalgo

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWL 110B - FOLK AND FAIRY TALES (SSI)
Fractured Feminist Fairy Tales
Instructor: Tatiana Zavodny

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A study of folk and fairy tales from various cultures and traditions. This course will incorporate analysis of literary form, psychological meaning, cultural function, and comparisons to contemporary adaptations.


LTWL 172GS - SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE (SSI)
Kafka, Prague and Modernism
Global Seminar location: Prague, Czech Republic

Instructor: Babak Rahimi

Visit  http://globalseminar.ucsd.edu/ for a description of the Global Seminars program and for more details about this course.


LTWL 175GS - THE CITY OF ROME (SSI)
Global Seminar location: Rome, Italy

Instructor: Matthew Herbst

Visit  http://globalseminar.ucsd.edu/ for a description of the Global Seminars program and for more details about this course.


LTWL 180GS - FILM STUDIES AND LITERATURE: FILM HISTORY (SSI)
Reimagining the Spanish Civil War
Global Seminar location: Grenada, Spain

Instructor: Robert Cancel

Visit  http://globalseminar.ucsd.edu/ for a description of the Global Seminars program and for more details about this course.


LTWL 184 - FILM STUDIES AND LITERATURE: CLOSE ANALYSIS OF FILMIC TEXT (SSII)
Latin American Film
Instructor: Jacobo Myerston

In this course we will study how Latin America is portrayed in recent avantgarde movies.  We will pay special attention to the representation of social class, gender, ethnicity, and the location of Latin America in global history.


LTWR 100 - SHORT FICTION WORKSHOP (SSII)
Write Believable Characters
Proposed Instructor: Shelby Salemi

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Students will reveal the stakes of character believability on real people. Students will write and workshop one flash fiction piece and one short story, and read selections from Steering the Craft and Sudden Fiction, to interrogate character memorability and realism.