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Literature Undergraduate Course Descriptions Fall 2018


LTAM 110 - LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION
Trauma, history and Memory in the Southern Cone
Instructor: Luis Martin-Cabrera

During the second half of the XX century Southern Cone Countries (Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay) experienced a multiplicity of dictatorial regimes. These dictatorships perpetrated a number of human rights violations that have been often constructed as a social trauma. In this class, we will take a psychoanalytical approach to trauma and memory in order to study the traces of violence and terror in cultural representations produced in the aftermath of these regimes. We will discuss novels by Roberto Bolaño, Ricardo Piglia, Nona Fernández, and films and documentaries such as Machuca, No, Garage Olympo or The Blondes.

  LTAM 110 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTCS 50 - INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL STUDIES
Instructor: Meg Wesling

We’ll spend the first part of the course thinking historically about the very concept of culture—when it emerges, how its meaning evolves, and what many things we mean when we talk about it.  Then we’ll look more closely at television, film, social media, and literature to think about how our understandings of the world around us – and our notions of language, nature, objectivity, race, sex, sexuality, and class – are constructed through the specificity of our own cultural lens.  Topics under consideration will include social media, popular culture, body modification (tattooing, bodybuilding, cosmetic surgery, etc.), and social rituals, among others.  Writing assignments will include short critical response papers and one final paper or project.


LTEA 120A - CHINESE FILMS
Visions of the City
Instructor: Yingjin Zhang

This course investigates visions of the city constructed in Chinese cinema over 90 years. We will watch films produced as early as 1922 and as recently as 2008. Weekly topics include urban entertainment and teahouse culture (1920s), urban corruption and cosmopolitanism (1930s), urban reconfiguration and idealism (1940s), urban reconstruction and socialist virtues (1950s), urban history and revolutionary aesthetics (1960s-1970s), urban migration and female sexuality (1980s-1990s), urban enigma and male subjectivity (1990s-2000s), urban quotidian and postsocialist nostalgia (1990s-2000s), urban theater and commercialism (2000s), as well as urban transformation and globalization (2000s-2010s). 

No knowledge of the Chinese language is required, but upper-division standing is recommended. All required films carry English subtitles, and all reading is done in English. 

  LTEA 120A will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTEA 138 - JAPANESE FILMS
Introduction

Instructor: Daisuke Miyao

This course offers an introduction to the study of Japanese cinema.  This course pays close attention to the languages and styles of films as well as the historical and socio-cultural contexts.  The primary goal of this course is to learn how to read formal and historical aspects of films and develop ability to talk about films in critical terms.

  LTEA 138 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTEN 21 - INTRODUCTION TO THE LITERATURE OF THE BRITISH ISLES: PRE-1660
Instructor: Dan Vitkus

This course surveys English literature from the Anglo-Saxon era to the Early Modern period (8 TH to 17 TH centuries) and introduces students to the university-level study of Medieval and Renaissance culture. We will learn about a variety of cultural and literary modes of production (lyric poetry, romance, drama, epic, etc.), and students will be asked to address important questions that persisted through the centuries, as the English language developed from Old English to Middle English to Modern English. Lectures will discuss the assigned readings and their cultural, social, and political contexts while asking students to engage in critical analysis, close reading, and awareness of historical difference.  At the same time, we will analyze the specific artistic techniques and rhetorical strategies (including verse form, symbol, allegory, and figurative language) that shape and enliven these lasting works of literary art.  Students will learn to appreciate and understand how Medieval and Renaissance cultures were different from our own, but they will also consider how these texts and their authors continue to speak to us and our concerns today. 


LTEN 25 - INTRODUCTION TO THE LITERATURE OF THE UNITED STATES, BEGINNINGS TO 1865
Instructor: Kathryn Walkiewicz

This course surveys an expansive body of literature and culture, beginning with pre-contact material and ending just before the U.S. Civil War. In this class we will take up various notions of myth and destiny to unpack the many ways writers articulated American identity and culture. The term “American,” however, is a slippery one. What precisely does it mean? Who counts as American? Is America the same things as the United States? What makes something “American literature”? Throughout the quarter we will turn to speeches, fiction, poetry, personal essays, maps, art, and periodicals to work through these questions. In addition, we will pay particular attention to the ways nation-formation, slavery, colonization, and industrialization shaped understandings of the United States, specifically, and the notion of “America” more broadly.


LTEN 28 - INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN AMERICAN LITERATURE
Instructor: Erin Suzuki

This survey course gives a broad overview and introduction to some of the major works, themes, and concepts central to the study of Asian American literature. This course will outline some of the artistic movements, debates, and critical concerns that have formulated the production and reception of Asian American literature in the twentieth and twenty-first century. Some of the questions this course will explore include: How do we define Asian American literature? Is Asian American literature ultimately a national or transnational project? And given the diversity of cultures, traditions, and gender roles included within the rubric of “Asian America,” is there a way of speaking about or representing a unified Asian American experience?


LTEN 112 - SHAKESPEARE I: THE ELIZABETHAN PERIOD (A)
Instructor: Dan Vitkus

The course will explore issues of concern to Shakespeare's audiences from his time to ours—including love, war, race, sex, mortality, good and evil--through a representative selection of plays from the first half of his career. We will pay close attention to Shakespeare’s masterful way with words and images, with plots and characters, but at the same time we will connect our close readings of Shakespeare’s dazzling language to broader interpretive investigations of these texts and their patterns of meaning.  As much as possible, the class will view and discuss film versions and adaptations of the plays in order to understand these texts as scripts for live performance. 


LTEN 140 - THE BRITISH NOVEL: 1790-1830 (B)
The World of Jane Austen

Instructor: Sarah Nicolazzo

It is a truth universally acknowledged that Jane Austen has much to say about marriage and manners. But what might her novels have to say about war, revolution, politics, poverty, and the world beyond the English country house? Surprisingly, quite a lot! This course places the novels of Jane Austen in the context of the literary, cultural, and political world that surrounded them. We will read Austen’s novels while immersing ourselves in the historical context of Austen’s time and considering her place as an author in conversation with a broader literary culture. At the same time, we will sharpen our skills of literary analysis, as we consider what Austen can teach us about how narrative works and how novels create worlds of their own.

This course fulfills the B requirement of the Literatures in English major.


LTEN 144 - THE BRITISH NOVEL: 1890 TO PRESENT (B)
Migration and Identity in the British Novel
Instructor: Ameeth Vijay

LTEN144 Flyer Thumbnail

Over the course of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, the United Kingdom has become home to immigrants from all over the world, particularly in the aftermath of decolonization.  In this course we will read literature that explores the experience of migration and its challenges to a sense of identity and belonging.  How do immigrant authors position themselves in relation to a British national identity that is at times capacious and at times exclusive?  What kinds of communities are formed through the shared experience of migration?  In addressing these and other questions, we will also read contemporary literature that tracks the experience of second and third-generation immigrants and the ways that "brexit" has affected the current political and cultural discourse.  

counts for B requirement


LTEN 154 - THE AMERICAN RENAISSANCE (C)
Instructor: Nicole Tonkovich

Feminist literary critique in the 1980s hoped to dismantle the idea that the work of a half-dozen white men comprised the canon of mid-nineteenth-century U. S. literature. Arguably, such has not been the case. Students and educated readers alike continue to identify Hawthorne, Poe, Whitman, Melville, Thoreau, and Emerson as those whose work defines this period.

In this course we will challenge that enduring misconception. We will read the work of several of the plethora of women who wrote during this period: Ann S. Stephens’s Malaeska, Fanny Fern’s Ruth Hall, E. D. E. N. Southworth’s The Hidden Hand, and Julia C. Collins’s The Curse of Caste. In the process we will discuss these questions: By what criteria do we measure the literary worth of a text? Do those criteria change? Who read these books in the moment of their publication? In what media? How did the work of these women writers engage the cultural conversations of their moment? Are their works still relevant? Do they have the potential to change our perception of this period of literary production?


LTEN 158 - MODERN AMERICAN LITERATURE (D)
Instructor: Erin Suzuki

The experiences of Asian and Pacific Islander communities in America have been marked by overlapping and often conflicting histories of diaspora and displacement. This course will explore the different literary and aesthetic strategies involved in narrating a sense of “home” or place both within and against the very projects of militarization, neoliberal capitalism, settler colonialism, and environmental degradation that have set them on the move.  Assigned texts may include work by Maxine Hong Kingston, Karen Tei Yamashita, Lois-Ann Yamanaka, Lawson Fusao Inada, Ocean Vuong, Craig Santos Perez, and Kathy Jetnil Kijiner,


LTEN 175A - NEW AMERICAN FICTION--POST WORLD WAR II TO THE PRESENT  (D)
Constructing the Body: Contemporary Narratives of Gender, Race, and Writing

Instructor: Meg Wesling

This course examines narratives of bodily self-invention and reinvention in contemporary American literature and film. We will discuss a variety of categories of identity, such as gender, race, sexuality, and disability, and read for the ways in which the body becomes a malleable thing within the cultural narratives that seek to define it. We will focus on how cultural and scientific narratives make meaning of the body, and how our understandings of the “natural” body have changed over time.


LTEN 178 - COMPARATIVE ETHNIC LITERATURE (D)
Equal Before the Law?

Instructor: Sarah Nicolazzo

This course examines how American literature has engaged with the law, power, and racial inequality from the time of the Constitution to the present. In particular, we will focus on how authors in the African American and Native American literary traditions have engaged with profound questions of personhood, citizenship, sovereignty, and justice—sometimes demanding equal recognition under the law and sometimes challenging the foundational logic of the law itself. We will read novels, autobiographies, and poems alongside laws, court decisions, and contemporary theories of race and the law as we explore how legal and literary texts spoke to each other— sometimes in surprisingly direct ways. At the same time, we will consider how lawyers, judges, activists, and ordinary people caught up in the legal system use language and interpretation as legal tools, and how legal and literary interpretation converge and differ. We will ask how law and literature pose fundamental questions: what does it mean to have rights? What does it mean to be equal before the law? What does it mean to be free? Authors may include Olaudah Equiano, Harriet Wilson, Samson Occom, M. NourbeSe Philip, Jesmyn Ward, Layli Long Soldier, and Joan Naviyuk Kane.

This course fulfills the DEI requirement, the D requirement of the Literatures in English major, and is petitionable as an elective for the Law & Society minor.


LTEU 150A - SURVEY OF RUSSIAN AND SOVIET LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION, 1800-1860
Instructor: Amelia Glaser

This course covers the major writers of Russia's "Golden Age", including Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, and the early Tolstoy and Dostoevsky, as well as original works by Katherine the Great. Course taught in English, but a Russian-language section will be available to students who can read the texts in the original.


LTFR 2A - INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I
Instructor: TA Supervised by  Catherine Ploye

First course in the intermediate sequence designed to be taken after LIFR1C/CX (If you choose to take LIFR1D/DX, you will still need to take LTFR 2A to continue in the French program). Short stories, cartoons and movies from various French-speaking countries are studied to strengthen oral and written language skills while developing reading competency and cultural literacy. A thorough review of grammar is included. Taught entirely in French. May be applied towards a minor in French literature.


LTFR 2B - INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

Plays from the 19th and 20th centuries as well as movies are studied to strengthen the skills developed in LTFR 2A. Includes a grammar review. Taught entirely in French. May be applied towards a minor in French literature or towards fulfilling the secondary literature requirement.


LTFR 50 - INTERMEDIATE FRENCH III: TEXTUAL ANALYSIS
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

Emphasizes the development of language skills and the practice of textual analysis. Discussions are based on the analysis of various poetic texts (poems, short story, and songs) and on a film. Taught entirely in French. May be applied towards a minor in French literature or towards fulfilling the secondary literature requirement. Students who have completed 50 can register in upper-level courses (115 or 116).


LTFR 115 - THEMES IN INTELLECTUAL AND LITERARY HISTORY
Instructor: Oumelbanine Zhiri

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTGK 1 - BEGINNING GREEK
Instructor: Jacobo Myerston

In this class students will be Introduced to ancient Greek, the language of great scientific, philosophical, historical, mythological, literary, and religious texts. In this introductory level, students will learn basic grammar and vocabulary, and engage with easy readings of Greek texts.

This is the first quarter of a three-quarter sequence. Following completion of this sequence (LTGK 1-2-3), students will be equipped to read, in the original Greek, philosophy, history, literature, the medical texts of Hippocrates, the geometrical treatise of Euclid and even the New Testament. They will also be eligible to enroll in upper-division Greek Literature courses. Students are evaluated by quizzes, and a final.

Learning ancient Greek gives students access to the foundational texts of many modern disciplines such as medicine, mathematics, history, philosophy and literary studies. Ancient Greek is fun to learn, improve your analytical skills and prepare you for advanced qualitative analysis. Many notable public figures such as California’s governor Jerry Brown majored in Classics. 

There is only one textbook used for the entire sequence of three quarters, namely:

Reading Greek, 2 nd edition published by Cambridge University Press.


LTGK 103 - GREEK DRAMA
Instructor: Page duBois

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTGM 2A - INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I
Instructor: Staff

LTGM 2A follows the basic language sequence of the Department of Linguistics and emphasizes the development of reading ability, listening comprehension, and conversational and writing skills. The course includes grammar review and class discussion of reading and audio-visual materials. Specifically, the course prepares students for LIGM 2B and 2C.


LTGM 101 - GERMAN STUDIES II: NATIONAL IDENTITIES
Instructor: Todd Kontje

What does it mean to be German? How has the nation been defined in the past? In this class we will explore constructions of German national identity from the emergence of national consciousness in the early modern period to today’s multi-cultural Germany. Readings and class discussions of literary works, films, and essays will be primarily in German. Please contact the instructor if you have questions.  Professor Todd Kontje tkontje@ucsd.edu


LTIT 2A - INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I
Instructor: Adriana de Marchi Gherini

Continue your journey trough the language and culture of Italy with a course that picks up where LINGIT 1C/CX leaves you, and takes you forward through readings, conversation, grammar, and media (music and film).  Additionally, learn to "talk with your hands,"  and to prepare and identify authentic Italian food.  Classes are run in Italian, and the materials used are authentic and current.  Prerequisite LINGIT 1C/CX, or equivalent.  In any case, if you have any questions about the course, or scheduling, contact me (Adriana De Marchi Gherini) at demarchi@ucsd.edu


LTIT 100 - INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURES IN ITALIAN
Italian Language and Culture Through Media and Social Sedia
Instructor: Adriana de Marchi Gherini

Italian newspapers, magazines, TV shows, and websites will be your unconventional textbooks in a course that focuses on the language and culture of contemporary Italy.  We will discuss contemporary events, politics, sports, fashion, food (of course!), immigration, multiculturalism, religion, as well as any relevant news story that comes up during the quarter.  We will talk about the "imaginary" Italy (Italy seen from the outside) vs. the "real" Italy.  Conversation and creative writing will be encouraged.  LTIT 100 can be taken several times for credit as long as the topic is different (and it is!).  Prerequisite is LTIT 50, or equivalent, or instructor's permission.  For any questions about the course, or scheduling, contact me (Adriana De Marchi Gherini) at demarchi@ucsd.edu


LTKO 1A - BEGINNING KOREAN: FIRST YEAR I
Instructor: TAs Supervised by  Jeyseon Lee

First year Korean 1A (5 units) is the first part of the Beginning Korean series. This course is designed to assist students to develop low-beginning level skills in the Korean language. These skills are speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as cultural understanding. This course will begin by introducing the writing and sound system of the Korean language. The remainder of the course will focus on grammatical patterns such as basic sentence structures, some grammatical points, and expressions. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following in Korean: 

Speaking:  Students are able to handle successfully a limited number of uncomplicated communicative tasks by creating with the language in straightforward social situation. Conversation is restricted to some of the concrete exchanges and predictable topics necessary for survival in the target-language culture. They can express personal meaning by combining and recombining what they know and what they hear from their interlocutors into short statements and discrete sentences.

Listening:  Students are able to understand some information from sentence-length speech, one utterance at a time, in basic personal and social contexts, though comprehension is often uneven.

Reading:  Students are able to understand some information from the simplest connected texts dealing with a limited number of personal and social needs, although there may be frequent misunderstandings.

Writing:  Students are able to meet some limited practical writing needs. They can create statements and formulate questions based on familiar material. Most sentences are re-combinations of learned vocabulary and structure.


LTKO 2A - INTERMEDIATE KOREAN: SECOND YEAR I
Instructor: TAs Supervised by Jeyseon Lee

Second Year Korean 2A is the first part of the Intermediate Korean. Students in this course are assumed to have previous knowledge of Korean, which was taught in the Korean 1A, 1B, and 1C courses. Students in this course will learn low-intermediate level skills in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Korean, as well as expand their cultural understanding. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to acquire and use more vocabularies, expressions and sentence structures and to have a good command of Korean in various conversational situations. Students are expected to write short essays using the vocabularies, expressions, and sentence structures introduced. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following in Korean:

Speaking:  Students are able to handle a variety of communicative tasks. They are able to participate in most informal and some formal conversations on topics related to school, home, and leisure activities. Students demonstrate the ability to narrate and describe in the major time frames in paragraph-length discourse. They show the ability  to combine and link sentences into connected discourse of paragraph length.

Listening:  Students are able to understand short conventional narrative and descriptive texts with a clear underlying structure though their comprehension may uneven. They understand the main facts and some supporting details. Comprehension may often derive primarily from situation and subject-matter knowledge.

Reading:  Students are able to understand conventional narrative and descriptive texts with a clear underlying structure though their comprehension may be uneven. These texts predominantly contain high-frequency vocabulary and structure. Students understand the main ideas and some supporting details. Comprehension may often derive primarily from situational and subject-matter knowledge.

Writing:  Students are able to meet basic work and/or academic writing needs. They are able to compose simple summaries on familiar topics. They are able to combine and link sentences into texts of paragraph length and structure. They demonstrate the ability to incorporate a limited number of cohesive devices.


LTKO 3 - ADVANCED KOREAN: THIRD YEAR
Instructor: Jeyseon Lee

Third Year Korean 3A (5 units) is the first part of the advanced Korean. Students in this course are assumed to have previous knowledge of Korean, which was taught in the Korean 2A, 2B, and 2C courses. Students in this course will learn low-advanced level skills in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Korean, as well as expand their cultural understanding. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to acquire and use more vocabularies, expressions and sentence structures and to have a good command of Korean in formal situations. Students are expected to read and understand daily newspapers and daily news broadcasts. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following in Korean:

Speaking:  Students are able to communicate with accuracy and fluency in order to participate fully and effectively in conversations on a variety of topics in formal and informal settings from both concrete and abstract perspectives. They discuss their interests and special fields of competence, explain complex matters in detail, and provide lengthy and coherent narrations, all with ease, fluency, and accuracy. They present their opinions on a number of issues of interest to them, and provide structured arguments to support these opinions.

Listening:  Students are able to understand speech in a standard dialect on a wide range of familiar and less familiar topics. They can follow linguistically complex extended discourse. Comprehension is no longer limited to the listener's familiarity with subject matter, but also comes from a command of the language that is supported by a broad vocabulary, an understanding of more complex structures and linguistic experience within the target culture. Students can understand not only what is said, but sometimes what is left unsaid.

Reading:  Students are able to understand texts from many genres dealing with a wide range of subjects, both familiar and unfamiliar. Comprehension is no longer limited to the reader's familiarity with subject matter, but also comes from a command of the language that is supported by a broad vocabulary, an understanding of complex structures and knowledge of the target culture. Students at this level can draw inferences from textual and extralinguistic clues.

Writing:  Students are able to produce most kinds of formal and informal correspondence, in-depth summaries, reports, and research papers. They demonstrate the ability to explain complex matters, and to present and support opinions by developing cogent arguments and hypotheses. They demonstrate a high degree of control of grammar and syntax, of general vocabulary, of spelling or symbol production, of cohesive devices, and of punctuation.


LTKO 149 - READINGS IN KOREAN LANGUAGE HISTORY AND STRUCTURE
Instructor: Jeyseon Lee

This course is designed to develop cultural understanding and professional/academic level reading skill for students with coverage of materials on Korean language history, previous and current writing systems, and Korean language structure. This is a Korean cultural/literature topics course designed for students to understand Korean language history and structure.

Readings in Korean Language History and Structure  I focuses on Korean language history and writing systems;  Readings in Korean Language History and Structure  II focuses on Korean language sound system and word formation system;  Readings in Korean Language History and Structure  III focuses on Korean language grammar system and meaning change.

LTKO 149 in the 2018 Fall quarter focuses on Korean language sound system and word formation system. 


LTLA 1 - BEGINNING LATIN
Instructor: Staff

Study of Latin, including grammar and reading.


LTLA 1 - BEGINNING LATIN
Instructor: Eliot Wirshbo

Demanding, difficult, dense, often demoralizing ... that description should deter about 98% of students at UCSD from Latin. The elementary sequence of the ancient language is all those things, but also the most practical subject for a person interested in developing a knowledge of words and their subtleties. From Latin comes most of our English vocabulary; from its study comes a deeper awareness of nuances of meaning and of semantic development. This awareness comes at a price, because you’ll need to show (more 'd's) devotion, dedication, even some doting on an alien idiom that will at times seem perverse in its strictures. An old-fashioned study, but with a transformative effect on the way students think and write.


LTLA 103 - LATIN DRAMA
Instructor: Eliot Wirshbo

Enthusiasts of Latin drama have a real pisser of a play awaiting them, though precisely which play is still to be determined. The committee is still, as of publication time, wrangling over which one of Seneca’s lurid tragedies would be most ... lurid. As the twelve readers of this blurb know, the occasional offerings of upper-division Latin violate all the taboos of a modern-day university, and Seneca is one of the most reliable practitioners of this vicarious violation. Expect some assortment of cannibalism, sibling brutality, inappropriate coupling, lust for power, tyrannical rage, seething pettiness, monstrous self-loathing — Seneca has ‘em all. 

The usual upper-division niceties will be observed, despite the rending of the norms of polite society which Seneca perpetrates.


LTRU 1A - FIRST-YEAR RUSSIAN
Instructor: Rebecca Wells

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTRU 2A - SECOND-YEAR RUSSIAN
Instructor: Rebecca Wells

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTRU 104B - ADVANCED PRACTICUM IN RUSSIAN: ANALYSIS OF TEXT AND FILM
Instructor: Rebecca Wells

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTRU 110A - SURVEY OF RUSSIAN AND SOVIET LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION, 1800-1860
Instructor: Amelia Glaser

This course covers the major writers of Russia's "Golden Age", including Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, and the early Tolstoy and Dostoevsky, as well as original works by Katherine the Great. Course taught in English, but a Russian-language section will be available to students who can read the texts in the original.


Intermediate courses in Spanish language/literature:

  • The introductory/beginning Spanish sequence (1ABCD) is offered through the Linguistics Language Program - see http://ling.ucsd.edu/language/llp-spanish.html
  • Intermediate language and upper-level language and literature courses are offered through the Literature Department - see: https://ltspoffer.blogspot.com
  • Contact bpita@ucsd.edu for further information and with questions regarding placement in LTSP 2ABCDE & 50ABC.
  • Students in LTSP 2A and 2B must attend both the lecture and discussion sections of the course.
  • Note: The final examinations for LTSP 2ABCDE & 50ABC will be held in common on SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8th, 2018.

LTSP 2A - INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I: FOUNDATIONS
Instructor: TAs Supervised by  Beatrice Pita

This 5 unit intermediate course meets 4 days per week and is taught entirely in Spanish. LTSP 2A emphasizes the development of communicative skills, reading ability, listening comprehension and writing skills. It includes grammar review, short readings, class discussions and working with Spanish-language video and Internet materials. This course is designed to prepare students for LTSP 2B and 2C. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisites: Completion of LISP 1C/CX, its equivalent, or a score of 3 on the AP Spanish language exam.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2A is scheduled for SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8th, 201 8.

Contact instructor bpita@ucsd.edu with  any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 2B - INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II: READINGS AND COMPOSITION
Instructor: Beatrice Pita and TAs supervised by Beatrice Pita

This intermediate course is designed for students who wish to improve their grammatical competence, ability to speak, read and write Spanish. It is a continuation of LTSP 2A with special emphasis on problems in writing and interpretation. Students meet with the instructor 4 days per week. Work for this 5 unit course includes oral presentations, grammar review, writing assignments, class discussions on the readings and work with Spanish-language video and Internet materials. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisites: Completion of LTSP 2A, its equivalent, or a score of 4 on the AP Spanish language exam.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2B is scheduled for SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8th, 201 8.

Contact instructor bpita@ucsd.edu with  any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 2D - INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED SPANISH: SPANISH FOR BILINGUAL SPEAKERS
Instructor: TAs supervised by  Beatrice Pita

Designed for bilingual students who have been exposed to Spanish at home but have little or no formal training in Spanish. The goal is for students who are comfortable understanding, reading and speaking in Spanish to further develop existing skills and to acquire greater oral fluency, and grammatical control  through grammar review, and reading and writing practice. Building on existing strengths, the course will allow students  to develop a variety of Spanish language strategies to express themselves in Spanish with greater ease and precision. Prepares native-speakers for  more advanced courses. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisite: Native speaking ability and/or recommendation of instructor.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2D is scheduled for SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8th, 201 8.

Enrollment for LTSP 2D requires department pre-authorization; contact instructor bpita@ucsd.edu with  any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 50A - READINGS IN PENINSULAR LITERATURE
Instructor: TAs Supervised by  Beatrice Pita

This course introduces students to Peninsular literature and literary analysis through the close textual reading of a selection of texts including novels, plays, short fiction and poetry. Coursework includes reading of several texts by Spanish authors, participation in class discussions, oral presentations and written assignments. LTSP 50A prepares Literature majors and minors for upper-division work. Two courses from the LTSP 50ABC series (any two) are required for Spanish Literature majors. May be applied towards a minor in Spanish Literature or towards fulfilling the second literature requirement for Literature majors. Prerequisites: Completion of LTSP 2C, 2D, 2E or 2 years of college level Spanish. 

Notes: The Final Exam for LTSP 50A is scheduled for SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8th, 201 8.

Contact instructor bpita@ucsd.edu with  any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 123 - TOPICS IN MODERN SPANISH
Representaciones culturales de la Guerra Civil Española

Instructor: Luis Martin-Cabrera

La guerra civil española es uno de los eventos históricos más importantes del siglo XX. Como tal, generó un buen número de debates e inspiró una multiplicidad de creaciones artísticas no sólo en España, sino también en Europa y las Américas. La impunidad de los crímenes perpetrados por la dictadura impuesta tras la Guerra Civil por el general Franco y perpetuada después en democracia, ha hecho que, en la actualidad, la Guerra Civil siga siendo objeto de múltiples representaciones culturales y debates intelectuales.

En esta clase estudiaremos tanto las representaciones culturales producidas durante la Guerra Civil como las que han surgido más recientemen. Algunas de las películas y textos que leeremos son:  Los girasoles ciegos, The Good fight,  El laberinto del Fauno o los testimonios de los supervivientes de la represión franquista.


LTSP 174 - TOPICS IN CULTURE AND POLITICS
Women, Sex, and Text
Instructor: Gloria Chacon

En esta clase nos enfocaremos en la producción, clasificación y teorización de la mujer y su posición en la sociedad. Las sociedades contemporáneas continúan o se debaten el legado colonial en sus relaciones sociales, y en particular, en relación a la construcción de género. Nos enfocaremos en textos representativos de autoras latinoamericanas y la narración de su propia subjetividad del siglo veinte.  Indagaremos en cuestiones de feminicidio, la violencia, sexualidad y el cuerpo.  Las preguntas que nos guiarán son las siguientes. ¿Cuál es la relación entre la mujer y el estado?  ¿Existe una sola categoría de la mujer en Latinoamérica?  ¿Qué de la relación entre ser minoría y ser mujer dentro del conjunto de países que llamamos Latinoamérica?


LTSP 176 - LITERATURE AND NATION
Instructor: Gloria Chacon

Este curso se enfocará en la relación entre nación y literatura en América Latina. Repasaremos debates claves sobre la civilización y la barbarie en el siglo XIX y su manifestación en la literatura. También abordaremos varios temas sobre la modernidad y la tradición en el siglo XX.  Los estudiantes aprenderán sobre los debates y teóricos más importantes en torno a lo qué es una nación y el rol de la literatura en establecer un sentido de pertenencia y comunidad. Los estudiantes leerán poesía y novelas, así como ensayos para pensar en las narrativas nacionales que competen sobre quién participa y quién está excluido en las literaturas nacionales. Prestaremos particular atención a las preguntas generales: ¿cómo se establecen las literaturas nacionales? ¿Quién participa en el proceso? ¿Qué ideología guía a nuestros autores?


LTTH 110 - HISTORY OF CRTICISM
Instructor: Seth Lerer

What is the place of literary criticism in society? Why argue about books? Why not just read them? This course explores the history of critical, philosophical, and pedagogical responses to literature. It begins with Classical notions of mimesis in Plato, works through ideas of poetics in Aristotle, looks briefly at medieval and early modern theories of allegory, and then addresses some of the major shapers of literary criticism: Philip Sidney ( Apology for Poetry), Samuel Johnson ( Lives of the Poets and Preface to the Dictionary), Wordsworth and Coleridge ( Preface to Lyrical Ballads), Keats and Shelley (letters and essays), Matthew Arnold ( Study of Poetry), T. S. Eliot ( Tradition and the Individual Talent), the rise of close reading and New Criticism (Richards, Brooks, Warren, Mack), and ending with selections from Eric Auerbach’s Mimesis.  Requirements: attendance and participation in class; five short (3-5pp) response papers in the course of the term.

 LTTH 110 is an LTEN equivalent course. 


LTWL 19A - INTRODUCTION TO THE ANCIENT GREEKS AND ROMANS
Instructor: Eliot Wirshbo

After more than a third of a century of ill-considered, behind-the-scenes machinations, the rightful instructor has been restored to this course. In it, students will be introduced to the wellsprings of Greek civilization through some of the most notable literary works of the pre-classical period. Poetry of various types (epic, didactic, lyric, political, philosophical, dramatic) and history will be marshaled so as to present a picture of what was once naively called 'the discovery of the mind.' This designation, despite its portentousness, may not be as far off as modern sophisticates reckon. Templates for heroism, morality, and social life in the western world were bracingly tested by the Greeks between about 700 and 500 BC[E]; these templates come to be questioned in the classical period, but never fully jettisoned.

2,500 word writing requirement spread over two papers, mid-term, final, daily lectures, modest gestures at profundity.


LTWL 87 - FRESHMAN SEMINAR
Dystopia in Film and Literature

Instructor: Lisa Lampert-Weissig

George Orwell’s dystopian classic, 1984, recently shot to the top of Amazon’s bestseller list. What does this novel, written in 1949, have to say to us today? We will explore political, environmental, and technological dystopias in works such as Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, Butler’s The Parable of the Talents, Collins’ The Hunger Games, and the UK television series Black Mirror.


LTWL 87 - FRESHMAN SEMINAR
Zombies: An Unnatural History

Instructor: Lisa Lampert-Weissig

Why is imagining a zombie apocalypse so compelling? Is the recent craze just mindless fun or are there political and social subtexts? We'll examine the origins of the zombie, early films from the 1940s, George Romero's Night of the Living Dead (1968), The Walking Dead and World War Z. More information at www.talesofthenight.org 


LTWL 158A - TOPICS IN THE NEW TESTAMENT
Instructor: Dayna Kalleres

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWL 177 - LITERATURE AND AGING
Instructor: Stephanie Jed

In this course, we will have the opportunity to explore the particular contribution of a humanistic approach to the research field of healthy aging. Studying literary texts, we will bring humanistic skills and practices to our discussion of such topics as the neurobiology of wisdom, bioengineering and writing, neuroscience and architecture, creativity and dementia, culture and heart disease, and literature and medical education.

 LTWL 177 is an LTEN equivalent course. 


LTWL 181 - FILM STUDIES AND LITERATURE: FILM MOVEMENT
Before Moonlight: New Queer Cinema and Its Afterlives
Instructor: Hoang Nguyen

As the first film movement centered on gay, lesbian, and queer sexualities, New Queer Cinema emerged in the early 1990s in the context of independent filmmaking, the AIDS pandemic, and gay/lesbian activism.  Up to that point, LGBT activists and critics had lobbied for positive images of gay people as normal upstanding citizens. By contrast, New Queer Cinema proponents adopted an anti-assimilationist, confrontational political stance. They embraced the view of queers as rebels, criminals, and outlaws as a way to challenge gay respectability politics based on heteronormative values. This course examines the social, political, and aesthetic context of New Queer Cinema in the 1990s and traces its enduring influence on contemporary LGBTQ cinema. The course asks, What's "queer" about LGBTQ cinema, now that LGBTQ has become a market genre on Netflix, Amazon, and YouTube? Units will include: indie  films, AIDS activist media, film festivals, global cinema, cable and web TV. Directors may include: Todd Haynes, Gregg Araki, Sadie Benning, Cheryl Dunye, Xavier Dolan, And Lucrecia Martel.

 LTWL 181 is an LTEN equivalent course. 


LTWL 194 - CAPSTONE COURSE FOR LITERATURE MAJORS
Instructor: Seth Lerer

What should every literature major know? What is the place of theory in the undergraduate experience? How do critics establish their voice? These are the questions we will ask throughout this course, designed for Literature Major seniors and, especially, those students considering to write an Honors Thesis. Classes will be devoted to close reading of selected works by contemporary critics and theorists, balanced by short student writing exercises engaging with those authors. Among the writers and ideas we will explore will be: Franco Moretti (distant reading), Deirdre Lynch (loving literature), Joseph North (the political history of literary criticism), Leah Price (book history), Sianne Ngai (cultural aesthetics), and Denise Gigante (the history of taste). I will also hope to share some of my own work in literary history with the class. Requirements: attendance and participation in class; four short (3-5pp) response papers in the course of the term; an oral presentation for those students planning an honors thesis.

 LTWL 194 is an LTEN equivalent course. 


LTWR 8A - WRITING FICTION
Instructor: Anna Joy Springer

This course introduces many of the  basic elements of contemporary fiction, including characterization, style, point-of-view, dialogue, theme, and narrative structure. Emphasis will be placed upon writing first from your most unfettered imagination, AND upon sculpting these wild writings into shapely short stories through a variety of creative revision techniques. Each week we will read both conventional and innovative short stories published (mostly) in the last thirty years, in order to discuss in context the fiction-writing techniques you’ll be practicing in your own writing. We will read 2-3 short stories a week. To explore craft and experimentation, there will be a number of writing exercises, both in and outside of class, which will help to generate a final short story as the quarter progresses. You will turn in a  2-page story  every week for group discussion and both draft and revised versions of a 10-page story at the end of the quarter. There will be reading quizzes in section, an extensive midterm, and a final exam on all readings and terms of fictional craft. Writing exercises and drafts will be reviewed in small groups led by undergraduate workshop leaders in order to facilitate your creative revision, revision, and revision process.  REQUIRED COURSE TEXTS: 1. To Buy:  What It Is  by Lynda Barry; 2. Provided: Two to three short stories each week, plus weekly readings on elements fictional craft. 


LTWR 8B - WRITING POETRY
Instructor: Brandon Som

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWR 100 - SHORT FICTION WORKSHOP
Instructor: Camille Forbes

Please contact instructor for course description. 


LTWR 102 - POETRY WORKSHOP
Instructor: Staff

A workshop for students with some experience and special interest in writing poetry. This workshop is designed to encourage regular writing of poetry. There will be discussion of student work, together with analysis and discussion of representative examples of poetry from the present and previous ages. May be taken for credit three times.


LTWR 106 - SCIENCE FICTION, FANTASY, AND IRREALISM WORKSHOP
Instructor: Anna Joy Springer

Please contact instructor for course description. 


LTWR 119 - WRITING FOR PERFORMANCE
Instructor: Staff

A workshop and survey of experimental approaches to the writing and production of performance works in a range of literary genres. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of written texts with nonverbal elements from the visual arts, theatre, and music.


LTWR 129 - DISTRIBUTING LITERATURE WORKSHOP
Instructor: Staff

Workshop designed to critique and engage the means of distributing literature within culture. Publishing from “zine” through mainstream publication; web publishings; readings and “slams”; publicity and funding; colloquia with writers; politics and literature; and the uses of performance and media. May be taken for credit three times. 


LTWR 148 - THEORY FOR WRITERS/WRITING FOR THEORY
Instructor: Staff

Hybrid workshop offering writing students a working knowledge of literary theory while exposing literature students to practical techniques from poetry, fiction, and nonfiction to refresh their writing of theoretical nonfiction texts. Discussion of student work and published work. 


LTWR 194 - CAPSTONE COURSE FOR WRITING MAJORS
Instructor: Lily Hoang

Please contact instructor for course description.