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Literature Undergraduate Course Descriptions Winter 2018


LTCS 52 - TOPICS IN CULTURAL STUDIES
Instructor: Ping-hui Liao

This course is on a global popular topic in cultural studies and world literature.  It considers the recent emergence of Sinophone discourse around the shifting notions of China as a geopolitical entity and of Chinese culture as part of transnational lived experience.  We shall examine theories of Sinophone and Chinese Diaspora around issues of identity performance—gender, racial, national, transnational, translational, and so on. Our main focus will be on artists from a rich diversity of pan Chinese speaking communities, particularly on the ways in which they draw on multicultural heritage to develop new visions of being Chinese along the direction of linguistic innovation and literary imagination.  Students need to do 20 minute presentations on the lives and works of sinophone artists.  They will formulate as a group weekly questions and comments in response to reading materials.  A short paper outlining term project with annotated bibliography is due during the fifth week. The final paper should be cogently argued and meticulously documented; it is to turn in at the end of the quarter. 


LTCS 87 - FRESHMAN SEMINAR
Television and American Identity
Instructor: Meg Wesling

This course examines aspects of how TV shapes our perceptions of the world we live in. We will focus on questions of race, gender, and sexuality in popular media and politics. Students will participate in selecting shows to analyze and discuss.


LTCS 87 - FRESHMAN SEMINAR
Reading Television: American Popular Culture
Instructor: Meg Wesling

This course is an introduction to TV studies. We will discuss how television shapes our ideas about gender, race, and American identity. Students will participate in selecting shows to analyze and discuss.


LTCS 87 - FRESHMAN SEMINAR
Digital Intimacies
Instructor: Hoang Nguyen

This course explores how digital technologies shape intimate relationships, focusing on how social networking connects us to other people or isolates us from them. We will examine practices such as texting, friending, blocking, posting, and hashtagging in relation to sex and dating apps, mail-order brides, transnational adoption, online bullying, and hate groups.


LTCS 110 - POPULAR CULTURE
East Asian Popular Culture
Instructor: Ping-hui Liao

The course focuses on the emergence of Korean/Chinese waves and of trans-Pacific or Asian American/Hollywood film co-production, alternative e-chat and Line networks across East Asia, Asian fashion and new sense of beauty, among other Asian pop trends.   To comprehend the new connectivities and the expanding popular cultural flows and exchanges in East Asia, we examine the historical conjectures in which these trans-regional codes and forces are constructed and circulated across borders.  Our main objective is to familiarize students with the cultural dynamics of East Asian creative industries and everyday practice.  Reading materials will be available on Ted; they deal with topics like Asian values and Korean/Chinese waves; queer faces and the sense of beauty; colonial modernity and postcolonial identity; nationalist responses to trans-regional conflicts and disputes; glocal cultural economy of the fake; comics and x-reality, among others.  Students are obliged to write commentaries on reading materials and to discuss in groups.  In addition, they need to team up and do group (2-3 persons) presentations on chosen topics.  A term paper is to be submitted at the end of the quarter. 

 LTCS 110 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTCS 150 - TOPICS IN CULTURAL STUDIES
Screening Sex
Instructor: Hoang Nguyen

This course will provide a historical and theoretical overview of the ways moving image sex acts have been represented on screen, from early cinema’s film loops to today’s celebrity sex tapes. It considers how the cinema has scripted how we learn, know, and experience sex and sexuality and how we make sense of ourselves as modern sexual subjects. Units include: stag movies, the Hollywood Production Code, the avant-garde, hard core, Blaxploitation, 1970s television, queer feminist porn, celebrity hacking scandals, and the digital revolution. 

 LTCS 150 is an LTEN equivalent course. 


LTEA 110B - MODERN CHINESE FICTION IN TRANSLATION 
Chinese Pop Culture: One Hundred Years
Instructor: Ari Heinrich

This course introduces the roots of Chinese popular culture in the late nineteenth and early 

twentieth centuries preceding the rise of Internet culture in the early 21st century. Examining topics such as Chinese traditions of martial arts fiction, the early years of Chinese jazz, early science fiction in China, crime fiction, and the problem of popular vs. elite culture in the production of early Chinese pulp fiction, the course emphasizes a core understanding of historical and cultural context as well as theoretical approaches to the phenomenology of popular culture. A primary goal of the course is to give students a foundation for understanding the historical background of contemporary popular cultural phenomena.

 LTEA 110B will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTEA 132 - LATER JAPANESE LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION
Akira Kurosawa
Instructor: Daisuke Miyao

Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998) is probably the most famous Japanese filmmaker in the world.  In Japan, Kurosawa was called “sekai no [world-famous] Kurosawa,” on the one hand, and “Kurosawa ten-no [the Emperor],” on the other hand.  As such, Kurosawa was the symbol of globalization and nationalism at the same time.  In this regard, Kurosawa Films give us an opportunity to think about what constitutes the cultural specificity of Japanese cinema.  This course closely analyzes the texts of his films (narratives, styles, techniques) as well as the socio-cultural discourses surrounding his works.  Such discourses will include the genre system in Japanese cinema; the influence of the wartime film policy, the postwar U.S. Occupation; the “invention of tradition” in Japanese art forms; the transformation of urban landscape in Japan; the decline of the Japanese film studio system; and globalization of cinema.

 LTEA 132 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTEA 138 - JAPANESE FILMS
Introduction
Instructor: Daisuke Miyao

This course offers an introduction to the study of Japanese cinema.  This course pays close attention to the languages and styles of films as well as the historical and socio-cultural contexts.  The primary goal of this course is to learn how to read formal and historical aspects of films and develop ability to talk about films in critical terms.

 LTEA 138 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTEA 141 - MODERN KOREAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION FROM 1945 TO PRESENT
Instructor: Benoit Berhelier

This course offers a survey of North Korea’s literary and cultural production since 1945. Going beyond the traditional stereotypes of North Korea as a Hermit Kingdom or the international community’s pariah, we will trace the development of North Korean culture in its interactions with the global world.

The course will look at how encounters with foreign cultural trends have shaped North Korean culture and how, in turn, this culture has engaged with the world around it. What can literary and visual representations tell us about how North Koreans see themselves and the world? How has North Korea reacted to cultural globalization and the increased availability of foreign media within its borders? In what international networks and institutions has North Korean culture historically been embedded? What role does culture play in the country’s domestic and international legitimacy politics?

The topics we will discuss include the reception of Orwell’s 1984 among North Korean science fiction writers, literary fame in the socialist world, ecological awareness in North Korea and Kim Il Sung’s ties to the Black Panther Party and African revolutionaries.

Primary readings cover a variety of genres and media such as novels, comic books, magazines, films, and music. The course is organized thematically around topics such as race, post-colonialism, diaspora, gender, ecology and science.

All reading materials are in English and no previous knowledge of Korean is required.


LTEN 22 - INTRODUCTION TO THE LITERATURE OF THE BRITISH ISLES: 1660-1832
Instructor: Sarah Nicolazzo

Are poets the "unacknowledged legislators of the world," as Percy Shelley wrote in 1820? Can literature build or topple empires? Is literature a business like any other, or does it transcend the logic of the market? Can anyone write literature, or is literary fame only accessible to those possessing the right family, gender, race, education, innate genius, emotional experience, or marketing savvy? Should literature represent entire nations, or reveal one individual's inner world?

These were pressing questions for British authors and readers between 1660 and 1832, a time period that included massive expansion in both literacy and the print industry, the birth of new genres like the newspaper and the novel, the Industrial Revolution, and Britain's transformation into the world's major imperial power. This class will offer an introduction to British literature of this tumultuous period, with particular focus on how authors defined the value of literature in a changing world. At the same time, we will practice the fundamental skills of literary analysis, learn the vocabulary of literary form, and learn how (and why) to read and write like a literary scholar. Throughout, we will return to the very questions that preoccupy the authors of our texts: what is literature, what does it do, and why does it matter? 


LTEN 25 - INTRODUCTION TO THE LITERATURE OF THE UNITED STATES, BEGINNINGS TO 1865
Instructor: Sara Johnson

This course presents a survey of American literature from the pre-colonial period to the years leading up to the Civil War.  We focus on the conflict and collaborations of several “national” cultures, as warring British, French and Spanish settlers fought Native populations for control over the continent in what would become the United States. From Puritan and Native American oratory, to captivity and travel narratives, to early poetry, novels and periodicals, we engage questions about the very nature of how “literature” and “American” were defined during the period. Texts are supplemented with early maps, visual images, and popular musical forms such as songs from the Broadway hit Hamilton: A Musical.  Special attention is paid to the historical contexts of the revolutionary period, the rise of slavery, gender roles, and forced Native American removals in a hemispheric context.


LTEN 29 - INTRODUCTION TO CHICANO LITERATURE
Instructor: Rosaura Sanchez

This course will serve as an introduction to Chicano/a - Latino/a literature and will address issues of history, labor and gentrification as represented in the literature.  In addition to the reading of several short narratives, students will be asked to read the following:  Rudolfo Anaya's Shaman Winter, Culture Clash's Chávez Ravine, Cherríe Moraga's Heroes and Saints, and Ernesto Quiñónez's Chango's Fire.  Students will also be asked to view two pertinent films.  In addition to attending lecture, students will participate in section, write two short papers and take a Mid Term and a Final Exam based on the readings and lectures.


LTEN 107 - CHAUCER (a)   (Course Flyer!)
Instructor: Lisa Lampert-Weissig

What was it like to live in the Middle Ages? We will explore this question through Chaucer’s masterpiece The Canterbury Tales.  Our examination of The Canterbury Tales will explore its historical, cultural and literary contexts.  Special attention will also be paid to issues of gender and sexuality and how they inflect Chaucer’s poetics and politics, as well as to the role of Christianity in Chaucer’s works.  There is only one required text, Jill Mann’s Penguin paperback edition of The Canterbury Tales (ISBN: 978-0140422344).  Please bring it to class on the first day so we can jump into the text immediately. For more information visit www.medievallit.org.


LTEN 110 - TOPICS: THE RENAISSANCE (a)
English Renaissance Drama

Instructor: Daniel Vitkus

Had Shakespeare never written for the stage, the dramatic literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries would still remain the richest body of theatrical writing in all of English literature.  This course will survey the extraordinary output of playwrights who wrote for the same London theater that staged Shakespeare's plays. We will read and discuss some of the best plays from this time and place, including works by Christopher Marlowe ("mad, bad, and dangerous to know"), Ben Jonson ("a man of vast reading and a seemingly insatiable appetite for controversy"), and John Webster (the mysterious author of "dark and brooding" tragedies). Students will explore the poetic language and social significance of these plays, always keeping in mind that these texts are scripts for live performance. Detailed literary analysis will be complemented by discussion of issues such as gender and sexuality, medicine, religion, witchcraft, royal power, seasonal festivity, and popular culture.


LTEN 138 - THE BRITISH NOVEL: 1680-1790 (b)
What is a Novel?

Instructor: Sarah Nicolazzo

This course charts the emergence of the novel as a new, experimental genre that began as a popular, but disrespected--even scandalous--form of entertainment before it went on to become one of our most well-respected and admired literary genres. When novels were new, they offered authors endless potential for experimenting with new kinds of literary characters, new ways of telling stories, and new ways of selling books to new groups of readers. They also posed questions that had no easy answers: what makes a novel a novel, anyway? Can a novel make its readers better people, and should it be expected to? Is a novel just a collection of lies, or can it tell another kind of truth?

We’ll think through these questions by learning about the world in which the English novel emerged, and by reading some of the most important early novels, both familiar and less so. Readings include Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe, Mary Wollstonecraft’s feminist fiction, and an array of early novels that are less familiar to contemporary readers: Elizabeth Singer Rowe’s collection of letters from the dead to the living, Samuel Richardson’s controversial bestseller Pamela alongside Henry Fielding’s scathing satire Shamela, and Maria Edgeworth’s Belinda—one of the most important predecessors of the comedy of manners later practiced by Jane Austen. This course fulfills the B requirement of the Literatures in English major.


LTEN 144 - THE BRITISH NOVEL: 1890 TO PRESENT (b)   (Course Flyer!)
City, Countryside, Colony

Instructor: Ameeth Vijay

This course considers twentieth and twenty-first century British literature as refracted through spaces fictive and real, among them the sprawling city, the disappearing countryside, and the global expanse of empire.   We will examine how the historical relationship between the city and the countryside has and is still represented in British literature while also adding a third term, the colony, as a means of reframing center-periphery and urban-provincial relationships.  In addition, this course finds that the metropole itself contains and creates centers and peripheries. Thus several of the texts disarticulate the space of the city to reveal its complexity and unevenness. Visual material or short secondary readings may be introduced in class so that we may study relevant historical contexts. Throughout we will consider matrices of race, sexuality, and class especially as they relate to shifting understandings of space in a Britain that is at once postcolonial and neoliberal.  Readings include Woolf, Orwell, Waugh, Selvon, Kureishi, and Z. Smith.


LTEN 148 - GENRES IN ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE
Scary Stories: Horror in Literature and Film

Instructor: Kathryn Walkiewicz

This course focuses on U.S. horror movies and horror fiction of the 21st century. How does an analysis of what scares us enable us to make sense of our cultural moment? What do current trends in horror movies and fiction tell us about pervasive fears and anxieties in the United States in 2017? How does horror as a genre open up questions about power, identity, violence, and injustice? In this course we will turn to film, literature, and critical theory to address these questions. 


LTEN 153 - THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR AND THE EARLY NATIONAL PERIOD IN US LITERATURE (c)
Revolutions and the Early Republic

Instructor: Kathryn Walkiewicz

This course delves into the historical events, cultural questions, and political debates key to the the U.S. nation-state’s formation. The early republic was the era in which terms like “democracy,” “liberty,” and “freedom” became key (but vexed) tenets of U.S. national identity. To better understand this era literarily, culturally, and politically, we will read across various genres, including political tracts, biographies, poetry, and prose, as well as look to visual culture from the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries. In our own moment there is particular interest in the early republic and what it symbolically represents in the twenty-first century. We will end the course with a discussion of why this might be, and what narrations of the past might reveal about the present. 


LTEN 159 - CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE (d)
Techno-Orientalism
Instructor: Erin Suzuki

Why are Asians, and Asia, so closely associated with ideas about technology, globalization, and the future? This course will focus on the evolution of these “techno-Orientalist” assumptions through critical analyses of popular texts, speculative fictions, and films from the early twentieth century through the present. From the machine-like Chinese “coolie” that haunted the racial imaginations of the early twentieth century to the superhuman cyborgs that populate the contemporary science fictional landscape, this course will explore the ways that Asian bodies have become exoticized through their relationship with technology, and vice versa. 


LTEN 176 - MAJOR AMERICAN WRITERS (d)
Bob Dylan
Instructor: William O'Brien

Bob Dylan: Nobel Prize laureate for Literature, rock star, recording artist, folk hero, live performer, bobdylan.com, songwriter, activist, recluse, sell-out, music legend.  The production and practice of American pop (or ‘folk’ or ‘rock’) music changed forever with the invention of Bob Dylan over 50 years ago.  Still performing today, after more than 50 studio albums and countless bootlegs, Dylan has extended musical forms—musically and lyrically—confounded audiences, and transformed himself countless times.

Centering on recorded performances, this course will investigate the phenomenon called Bob Dylan.  We will listen to music from the earliest Capitol recordings through the most recent original work; and we will always attend to the historical, political, aesthetic, and cultural complexities of Dylan’s writing and performance.

All media available online.  You will need to download ten complete CDs for study.  Some books will be recommended and available online or at the UCSD Bookstore.

Requirements: Weekly written responses to your home listening and viewing, and a final exam.


LTEN 178 - COMPARATIVE ETHNIC LITERATURE (d)
Literary Responses to Trauma
Instructor: Lisa Lampert-Weissig

In her acceptance speech for the Nobel Prize in Literature, Toni Morrison said “Language can never 'pin down' slavery, genocide, war. Nor should it yearn for the arrogance to be able to do so. Its force, its felicity, is in its reach toward the ineffable.” Despite the impossibility of “pinning down” slavery, genocide and war through language, writers have, nevertheless tried to convey the impact of atrocity, of collective trauma on groups and on individuals.

In this course students will read literary responses to war, genocide and slavery by individuals from several ethnic groups in the U.S.: African-Americans, Jewish-Americans, Vietnamese-Americans and Native Americans.  I have chosen the U.S. works below because they are each explorations of responses to collective trauma as it impacts the individual and family across generations.  These works represent experiences of those who are native to the U.S., those who immigrated here either willingly or as refugees and those who were brought here forcibly.  Each work engages with the experience of the ethnic group within the larger frame of the “American experience.” 

Another striking thing that the works covered in the course all share is their engagement with some form of the otherworldly, either through representation of the supernatural, the use of “magic realism” or, in the case of Octavia Butler’s science fiction novel about slavery, Kindred, exploration of time travel.  A focus on the fantastic, magic realism and experimental form will unite our readings and explorations. We will specifically consider the ways in which the authors we examine use literary form and the fantastic to attempt to convey extreme experiences both in the past and in the present day and how these literary choices affect the reader. 

Some of the readings planned are:  Isaac Bashevis Singer, Enemies, a Love Story (1972), Octavia Butler, Kindred (1979); Louise Erdrich, Love Medicine (1988); Toni Morrison, Beloved (1987); Art Spiegelman, Maus I and II (1991); Jonathan Safran Foer, Everything is Illuminated (2002); lê thi diem thúy, The Gangster We are All Looking For (2003); secondary readings on magical realism, collective memory and the fantastic


LTEN 189 - TWENTIETH-CENTURY POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURES   (Course Flyer!)
Displacement and Belonging

Instructor: Ameeth Vijay

This courses traces a literary history of global displacement and migration.  We will read literature that narrates the plight of refugees, the struggles of migrant labor, and the stories of those who otherwise have been forced to leave their homes for distant shores.   Examining these narratives through a historical lens, we will ask how colonialism creates the conditions for contemporary displacement and migration.  Displacement renders the home as a site of loss, but we will also consider how the home can be fantasies of places that never were, or imaginations of a future belonging.  Along the way, we will study the legal and technological regimes that have governed global mobility since the first World War, including the impact of international law, the global economy, transnational governance, and identity documents.

 LTEN 189 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTEU 105 - MEDIEVAL STUDIES
Instructor: Adriana De Marchi Gherini

The ultimate dystopian society:  a deadly plague has turned a prosperous, advanced civilization into lawless chaos.  No more law, order, family ties, hope.  In the middle of this horror, ten young boys and girls decide to physically leave behind what is left of their world, and bring it back to life through their storytelling.  Everything that mattered to them and at that time was lost, resurfaces through their words:  love, wit, friendship, travel, food, religion, sex, and more.

In this course we'll read Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio, in English.  Each student will give an oral presentation and write a paper.


LTEU 154 - RUSSIAN CULTURE
Post-Soviet Literature and Film: Russia and Beyond

Instructor: Ainsley Morse

The Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, but the aftershocks of that cataclysm are still being felt today. What is the difference between Russian and Soviet art? How might interrogating that difference help us to better understand Russia today? This course will serve as an introduction to both late Soviet and contemporary Russian literature and culture. We will wrestle with the paradox of writers witnessing profound societal changes and yet returning again and again to many of the same (political, ideological and aesthetic) principles and problems. Our readings (and viewings) will be guided by questions including: how is this work part of its time? What are the recurring preoccupations of these authors? Can we observe broad changes over time, or does everything keep going back to where it started? How often am I experiencing déjà vu? We’ll end the class with student readings of chosen texts as a way of getting inside the (post-)Soviet experience.

All readings in English / films subtitled. Advanced students of Russian are encouraged to read as much as possible in the original; depending on the size and makeup of the class, an additional weekly meeting to discuss particulars of the Russian texts can be arranged. 


LTFR 2B - INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II
Instructor: TAs supervised by Catherine Ploye

Plays from the 19th and 20th centuries as well as movies are studied to strengthen the skills developed in LTFR 2A. Includes a grammar review. Taught entirely in French. May be applied towards a minor in French literature or towards fulfilling the secondary literature requirement.

Prerequisite:  LTFR 2A or equivalent or a score of 4 on the AP French language exam.


LTFR 2C - INTERMEDIATE FRENCH III: COMPOSITION AND CULTURAL CONTEXTS
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

Emphasizes the development of effective communication in writing and speaking. Includes a grammar review. A contemporary novel and a film are studied to explore cultural and social issues in France today. Taught entirely in French. May be applied towards a minor in French literature or towards fulfilling the secondary literature requirement.

Prerequisite: LTFR 2B or equivalent or a score of 5 on the AP French language exam.


LTFR 123 - EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
1789: French Revolution Literature

Instructor: Oumelbanine Zhiri

In this class, we will discuss the momentous events of the 1789 French Revolution, and will read and study contemporary literary texts, as well as texts written in the years that preceded and followed it.


LTFR 142 - TOPICS IN LITERARY GENRES IN FRENCH
Texte et image
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

Nous étudierons des romans des 20e et 21e siècles qui ont fait sensation, parfois scandale, au moment de leur parution et analyserons en parallèle des adaptations filmographiques de ces textes (ou des films contemporains traitant de sujets similaires).

Auteurs possibles: Sagan, Duras, Modiano, Daenincks

Prerequisite: LTFR 115 or 116 or equivalent or authorization–


LTGK 2 - INTERMEDIATE GREEK
Instructor: Julia Mebane

In this three-quarter sequence, (LTGK 1-2-3), students will learn the fundamentals of ancient Greek, the language of Homer, Plato, Herodotus, and the New Testament. Over the course of the year, they will acquire basic grammar and vocabulary and engage with adapted readings of Greek texts. In the second quarter, they will continue to practice verb morphology and the uses of the five cases, as well as master new vocabulary and more complex grammatical constructions. In addition to linguistic knowledge, students will develop an understanding of and appreciation for Greek culture, which gave rise to the disciplines of medicine, mathematics, philosophy, and history, as well as the institution of democracy. Assessments will include short homework assignments, weekly quizzes, a midterm, and a final.


LTGK 105 - TOPICS IN GREEK LITERATURE
Plato's Republic Book 1
Instructor: Jacobo Myerston

Plato’s Republic is one of those rare texts that has provoked many readers through more than two millennia. In it Plato undertakes a systemic study of the idea of the good and justice, using an accessible dialog between friends as the stage for his examination.   The first book of the Republic is remarkable for its simplicity of language, clarity, and amusing representation of the intellectual life of classical Athens. In this class, students will keep learning ancient Greek and, at the same, will be introduced to the work of the most influential philosopher of antiquity. Knowledge of ancient Greek is required. This course may be repeated for credit as the topics vary.


LTGM 2B - INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II
Instructor: Eva Fischer-Grunski

LTGM 2B is an intermediate-level course conducted entirely in German. The course provides a review and an expansion of the four German language skills. 2B emphasises reading authentic literature, culture texts and discussions of current events and films. Another focus is the review of grammar and gaining more communication skills in the target language. 


LTIT 2B - INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II
Instructor: Adriana De Marchi Gherini

the middle section of the second year Italian sequence, LTIT 2B will introduce students to more aspects of Italian life and society. Readings, conversation topics, videos, games, and "theatrical" presentations will help practice the language and learn more about Italy, Europe, and the world in general.


LTIT 115 - MEDIEVAL STUDIES
Instructor: Adriana De Marchi Gherini

The ultimate dystopian society:  a deadly plague has turned a prosperous, advanced civilization into lawless chaos.  No more law, order, family ties, hope.  In the middle of this horror, ten young boys and girls decide to physically leave behind what is left of their world, and bring it back to life through their storytelling.  Everything that mattered to them and at that time was lost, resurfaces through their words:  love, wit, friendship, travel, food, religion, sex, and more.

In this course we'll read Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio, in English.  Each student will give an oral presentation and write a paper.


For more information about the UCSD Korean Language Program please visit: http://ucsdkoreanlanguage.blogspot.com/


LTKO 1B - BEGINNING KOREAN: FIRST YEAR II 
Instructor: TAs Supervised by Jeyseon Lee

First Year Korean 1B (5 units) is the second part of the Beginning Korean series. This course is designed to assist students to develop mid-beginning level skills in the Korean language. These skills are speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as cultural understanding. LTKO 1B is designed for students who have already mastered the materials covered in LTKO 1A or who are already in the equivalent proficiency level. This course will focus on grammatical patterns, such as sentence structures, some simple grammatical points, and some survival level use of the Korean language. Additionally, speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension will all be emphasized, with special attention to oral speech. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following in Korean: 

Speaking: Students are able to handle successfully a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks in straightforward social situations. Conversation is generally limited to those predictable and concrete exchange necessary for survival in the target culture. They are capable of asking a variety of questions when necessary to obtain simple information to satisfy basic needs.

Listening: Students are able to understand simple, sentence-length speech, one utterance at a time, in variety of basic personal and social contexts. Comprehension is most often accurate with highly familiar and predictable topics although a few misunderstandings may occur.

Reading: Students are able to understand short, non-complex texts that convey basic information and deal with basic personal and social topics to which they bring personal interest or knowledge, although some misunderstandings may occur. They may get some meaning from short connected texts featuring description and narration, dealing with familiar topics.

Writing: Students are able to meet a number of practical writing needs. They can write short, simple communications, compositions, and requests for information in loosely connected texts about personal preferences, daily routines, common events, and other personal topics.


LTKO 2B - INTERMEDIATE KOREAN: SECOND YEAR II
Instructor: TAs Supervised by Jeyseon Lee

Second Year Korean 2B (5 units) is the second part of the Intermediate Korean. Students in this course are assumed to have previous knowledge of Korean, which was taught during the Korean 1A, 1B, 1C, and 2A courses. Students in this course will learn mid-intermediate level of standard modern Korean in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as expand their cultural understanding. After the completion of this course, students are expected to acquire and use more vocabularies, expressions, and sentence structures and to have a good command of Korean in various conversational situations. Students are also expected to write short essays using the vocabularies, expressions, and sentence structures introduced. Upon completion of this course, students will become able to do the following in Korean: 

Speaking: Students are able to handle with ease and confidence a large number of communicative tasks. They participate actively in most informal and some formal exchanges on a variety of concrete topics relating to work, school, home, and leisure activities, as well as topics relating to events of current, public, and personal interest or individual relevance.

Listening: Students are able to understand conventional narrative and descriptive texts, such as extended descriptions of persons, places, and things, and narrations about past, present, and future events. The speech is predominantly in familiar target-language patterns. They understand the main facts and many supporting details.

Reading: Students are able to understand conventional narrative and descriptive texts, such as extended descriptions of persons, places, and things an narrations about past, present, and future events. They understand the main ideas, facts and many supporting details. Students my derive some meaning from texts that are structurally and/or conceptually more complex.

Writing: Students are able to meet a range of work and/or academic writing needs. They are able to write straightforward summaries on topics of general interest. There is good control of the most frequently used target-language syntactic structure and a range of general vocabulary.


LTKO 3 - ADVANCED KOREAN: THIRD YEAR
Instructor: TAs Supervised by Jeyseon Lee

Third Year Korean 3 in winter (5 units) is the second part of the advanced Korean. Students in this course are assumed to have previous knowledge of Korean, which was taught in the Korean 2A, 2B, 2C and 3 in the fall courses. Students in this course will learn mid-advanced level skills in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Korean, as well as expand their cultural understanding. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to acquire and use more vocabularies, expressions and sentence structures and to have a good command of Korean in formal situations. Students are expected to read and understand daily newspapers and daily news broadcasts. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following in Korean:

Speaking: Students are able to communicate with accuracy and fluency in order to participate fully and effectively in conversations on a variety of topics in formal and informal settings from both concrete and abstract perspectives. They discuss their interests and special fields of competence, explain complex matters in detail, and provide lengthy and coherent narrations, all with ease, fluency, and accuracy. They present their opinions on a number of issues of interest to them, and provide structured arguments to support these opinions.

Listening: Students are able to understand speech in a standard dialect on a wide range of familiar and less familiar topics. They can follow linguistically complex extended discourse. Comprehension is no longer limited to the listener's familiarity with subject matter, but also comes from a command of the language that is supported by a broad vocabulary, an understanding of more complex structures and linguistic experience within the target culture. Students can understand not only what is said, but sometimes what is left unsaid.

Reading: Students are able to understand texts from many genres dealing with a wide range of subjects, both familiar and unfamiliar. Comprehension is no longer limited to the reader's familiarity with subject matter, but also comes from a command of the language that is supported by a broad vocabulary, an understanding of complex structures and knowledge of the target culture. Students at this level can draw inferences from textual and extralinguistic clues.

Writing: Students are able to produce most kinds of formal and informal correspondence, in-depth summaries, reports, and research papers. They demonstrate the ability to explain complex matters, and to present and support opinions by developing cogent arguments and hypotheses. They demonstrate a high degree of control of grammar and syntax, of general vocabulary, of spelling or symbol production, of cohesive devices, and of punctuation.


LTKO 149 - READINGS IN KOREAN LANGUAGE HISTORY & STRUCTURE 
Instructor: Jeyseon Lee

This course is designed to develop cultural understanding and professional/academic level reading skill for students with coverage of materials on Korean language history from the 5th century to the present, previous and current writing systems, and Korean language structure. This is a Korean cultural/literature topics course designed for students to understand Korean language history and structure.

Readings in Korean Language History and Structure I focuses on Korean language history and writing systems; Readings in Korean Language History and Structure II focuses on Korean language sound system and word formation system; Readings in Korean Language History and Structure III focuses on Korean language grammar system and meaning change.

LTKO 149 in this winter will focuses on Korean language sound system and word formation system.


LTLA 2 - INTERMEDIATE LATIN I
Instructor: Eliot Wirshbo

We move on from Euclio's shenanigans to a 'sex'-filled, confusion-of-identities play as the mortar for our grammatical brick-laying. All the while, as we chortle through slapstick and verbal humor, students will be acquiring a knowledge of Latin painlessly, with hardly any effort! (There's also a nice bridge over the Tiber for sale, cheap, o trusting students.) Just as the first term featured such evocative terms as the vocative case and appositional phrases and irregular imperatives, so will this sequel boast of irresistible topics like the Ablative of Time (essential learning for the aspiring yoga practitioner) and Future Deponent Participles.With such items on the agenda, who wouldn't want to sign up fast and secure a comfy seat on the Latin train?

The unpleasant but necessary side will feature the same six quizzes and mid-term as in the first term, not to mention the daily in-class recitals and the dread final exam. But studies have shown that students of Latin lead much happier lives than, say, science majors, or at least are better able to detect a snow job, so the unpleasant side is outweighed by the tremendous gain in wisdom.


LTLA 2 - INTERMEDIATE LATIN I
Instructor: Julia Mebane

In this three-quarter sequence (LTLA 1-2-3), students will learn the fundamentals of Latin grammar and begin reading the comedies of Plautus, speeches of Cicero, and history of Livy. In LTLA 2, students will continue to master verb morphology and the usage of the six cases, as well as acquire new vocabulary and begin reading original primary texts.  We’ll spend time considering how Latin evolved from one of many regional languages on the Italian peninsula to the dominant language of the Roman empire. We will also study graffiti, inscriptions, and papyrus fragments in order to appreciate Latin as a living language used by millions of people in the ancient world. Assessments will include short homework assignments, weekly quizzes, a midterm, and a final.


LTLA 103 - LATIN DRAMA
Instructor: Eliot Wirshbo

Recent experience has shown that, contrary to all logic, the comedies of Plautus can be read and enjoyed, even giggled at, by students in their second or third year of Latin. The key to the success of this effort is a properly annotated text that will anticipate the difficulties that even more experienced students have with the odd spellings and colloquialisms of pre-Classical Latin. But your tireless instructor, anticipating your every need, has secured just such a text and will distribute copies on the first day of class, as well as play, seemingly without effort, the role of the miserly old man. (This will include rude slapstick bits, so be prepared for unconventional hilarity on day one.)

Sadly, as a counter-balance to the hilarity, there will be some conventional academic requirements, just to preclude any investigation by the authorities when they discover that such ribald laughter is emanating from a classroom on campus: a mid-term, a paper, and a final are part of the deal. You laugh, you suffer: both parts of drama.


LTRU 1B - FIRST-YEAR RUSSIAN 
Instructor: Rebecca Wells

Here you will build on the fundamentals of Russian which you developed in our first quarter of study. We will dive into the true heart of Russian grammar, developing your ability to communicate with increasing accuracy and detail. Class is divided into lecture and discussion sections. There are separate weekly discussion times for heritage and non-heritage speakers. We will follow our beginning textbook and supplements, but also work with outside sources from film and the internet.


LTRU 2B - SECOND-YEAR RUSSIAN 
Instructor: Rebecca Wells

Here you will build on the fundamentals of Russian which you gained through your previous work with Russian. We will review and expand on basics, developing your ability to communicate with increasing detail, creativity, and precision. Class is divided into lecture and discussion sections. There will be separate weekly discussion times for heritage speakers and non-heritage speakers, and you will participate in weekly online film discussions as well. We will follow an intermediate textbook, but also work with outside sources from books, magazines, films, and the internet.


LTRU 104C - ADVANCED PRACTICUM IN RUSSIAN 
Instructor: Rebecca Wells

Enter into a cooperative learning experiment designed to challenge students at many levels of advanced Russian. Native and non-native speakers alike will undertake an exploration into Russian literature, history, and culture in an effort to improve both social and academic functioning in Russian, to refine and develop further linguistic and cultural expertise. This winter quarter our main text will be the historical novel Капитанская дочка (The Captain’s daughter) written by Александр Сергеевич Пушкин. We will read and discuss the work in depth, along with relevant biographical, literary, historical, social, philosophical, and political issues. We will view and analyze several current and classic films as points of comparison on various issues. All non-native speakers will meet for a separate discussion section once a week to give them extra support with their reading. Course culminates in creative final group project.


LTRU 150 - RUSSIAN CULTURE
Post-Soviet Literature and FIlm: Russia and Beyond
Instructor: Ainsley Morse

The Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, but the aftershocks of that cataclysm are still being felt today. What is the difference between Russian and Soviet art? How might interrogating that difference help us to better understand Russia today? This course will serve as an introduction to both late Soviet and contemporary Russian literature and culture. We will wrestle with the paradox of writers witnessing profound societal changes and yet returning again and again to many of the same (political, ideological and aesthetic) principles and problems. Our readings (and viewings) will be guided by questions including: how is this work part of its time? What are the recurring preoccupations of these authors? Can we observe broad changes over time, or does everything keep going back to where it started? How often am I experiencing déjà vu? We’ll end the class with student readings of chosen texts as a way of getting inside the (post-)Soviet experience.

All readings in English / films subtitled. Advanced students of Russian are encouraged to read as much as possible in the original; depending on the size and makeup of the class, an additional weekly meeting to discuss particulars of the Russian texts can be arranged. 


LTSP 2B - INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II: READINGS AND COMPOSITION
Instructor: TAs supervised by Beatrice Pita

This intermediate course is designed for students who wish to improve their grammatical competence, ability to speak, read and write Spanish. It is a continuation of LTSP 2A with special emphasis on problems in writing and interpretation. Students meet with the instructor 4 days per week. Work for this 5 unit course includes oral presentations, grammar review, writing assignments, class discussions on the readings and work with Spanish-language video and Internet materials. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisites: Completion of LTSP 2A, its equivalent, or a score of 4 on the AP Spanish language exam.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2B is scheduled for SATURDAY, MARCH 17th, 2018. Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 2C - INTERMEDIATE SPANISH III: CULTURAL TOPICS AND COMPOSITION
Instructor: TAs supervised by Beatrice Pita

The goal of this intermediate language course is twofold: to further develop all skill areas in Spanish and to increase Spanish language-based cultural literacy. LTSP 2C is a continuation of the LTSP second-year sequence with special emphasis on problems in grammar, writing and translation. It includes class discussions of cultural topics as well as grammar review and composition assignments. The course will further develop the ability to read articles, essays and longer pieces of fictional and non-fictional texts as well as the understanding of Spanish-language materials on the Internet. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisite: Completion of LTSP 2B, its equivalent, or a score of 5 on the AP Spanish language exam. This course satisfies the third course requirement of the college- required language sequence as well as the language requirement for participation in UC- EAP .

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2C is scheduled for SATURDAY, MARCH 17th, 2018. Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 2D - INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED SPANISH: SPANISH FOR BILINGUAL SPEAKERS
Instructor: TAs supervised by Beatrice Pita

Designed for bilingual students who have been exposed to Spanish at home but have little or no formal training in Spanish. The goal is for students who are comfortable understanding, reading and speaking in Spanish to further develop existing skills and to acquire greater oral fluency, and grammatical control through grammar review, and reading and writing practice. Building on existing strengths, the course will allow students to develop a variety of Spanish language strategies to express themselves in Spanish with greater ease and precision. Prepares native-speakers for more advanced courses. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisite: Native speaking ability and/or recommendation of instructor.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2D is scheduled for SATURDAY, MARCH 17th, 2018. Enrollment for LTSP 2D requires department pre-authorization; contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 50B - READINGS IN LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE 
Instructor: TAs supervised by Beatrice Pita

This course introduces students to cultural analysis through the close textual reading of a selection of Latin American texts including novels, plays, short fiction and poetry. Coursework includes reading of texts, participation in class discussions and written assignments. LTSP 50B prepares Literature majors and minors for upper-division work. Two classes from the LTSP 50ABC series (any two) are required for Spanish Literature majors. May be applied towards a minor in Spanish Literature or towards fulfilling the second literature requirement for Literature majors. Prerequisites: Completion of LTSP 2C, 2D, 2E or 2 years of college level Spanish.

Notes: The Final Exam for LTSP 50B is scheduled for SATURDAY, MARCH 17th, 2018. Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 140 - LATIN AMERICAN NOVEL
Instructor: Milos Kokotovic

¿Qué es el crimen cuando el sistema mismo es criminal?  ¿Quién defiende el orden público cuando el estado ni está en orden ni representa al público?  En este curso vamos a leer novelas negras o policiacas de varios países latinoamericanos publicadas entre 1985 y 2000.  Analizaremos la forma en que estas obras representan la desigualdad, corrupción, crimen y violencia de los últimos 30 años en América Latina, y la manera en que critican estos fenómenos y sus causas.  Como la novela negra es un género predominantemente urbano, también estudiaremos la representación de las ciudades latinoamericanas en estos textos (e.g. México D.F., Santiago, San Salvador, Bogotá). Vamos a leer obras de Paco Ignacio Taibo II (México), Ramón Díaz Eterovic (Chile), Mario Mendoza (Colombia), Horacio Castellanos Moya (El Salvador), y Elmer Mendoza (México).

 LTSP 140 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTSP 142 - LATIN AMERICAN SHORT STORY
Instructor: Milos Kokotovic

En este curso vamos a leer una selección de cuentos latinoamericanos de los siglos XX y XXI de varios países (Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, México, Nicaragua, Perú, Puerto Rico).  Analizaremos cómo se ha usado el género del cuento para representar temas sociales como la modernización, el autoritarismo, el imperialismo, la revolución y el papel de grupos tradicionalmente subordinados (e.g. las mujeres, los pueblos indígenas) en estos procesos. Vamos a leer cuentos de Augusto Monterroso (Guatemala), Juan Rulfo (México), Gabriel García Márquez (Colombia), Sergio Ramírez (Nicaragua), Julio Cortázar (Argentina), Elena Garro (México), Rosario Ferré (Puerto Rico), Pía Barros (Chile), Jacinta Escudos (El Salvador), y Claudia Hernández (El Salvador).

 LTSP 142 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTSP 176 - LITERATURE AND NATION
Instructor: Gloria Chacon

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTTH 115 - INTRODUCTION TO CRITICAL THEORY
Instructor: Daniel Vitkus

This course offers an introduction to the most important concepts and critical issues in literary and cultural studies today.  Our primary focus will be literary theory and critical methodology.  The study of literary theory will lead us to explore exciting, foundational questions having to do with textual interpretation, cultural production, and the making of meaning. Students will learn about the most important schools of recent and contemporary literary theory and then apply these theories to the interpretation of literature and other cultural productions. We will ask not only "What do these texts mean?" but also "How do they mean?" Some of the other questions we will raise and discuss include the following: what is "literature"? What is the purpose and function of literary studies? How do we determine what a text means? Where does meaning reside-in the author, the reader, or the text? What is the relationship between literature and society? Between text and historical context? Our study of critical theory will help us to understand the ways in which literature and culture both respond to and shape the world around us.


LTWL 19B - INTRODUCTION TO THE ANCIENT GREEKS AND ROMANS
Instructor: Eliot Wirshbo

This is the granddaddy of all the culture-survey courses, having originated in the post-WWII era when a sudden infusion of soldier-students raised the question of what to teach those veterans that had some academic weight. (Not at UCSD, but in general.) Classical antiquity still somehow has some cachet, even as it has taken its place among a slew of other, similar courses that attempt to expose students to the ways of other cultures. But why still look to the ancient Greeks (and Romans) as having something unique to offer?

The answer lies in the variety, quality, and foundational nature of what the Greeks said and did. There's something inherently interesting but also helpful (and, odd to say, practicalabout contemplating the earliest ruminations on the nature of the male-female relation, or reasons for going to war, or our internal conflict over whether to be conforming members of society or wild rebels, or whether to live our lives according to lofty ideals or brutal realities. 

It is always interesting to see how other peoples far removed from us deal with inescapable human 'issues'; it is remarkable to see how sometimes the very articulation of those issues -- the manner in which they are framed -- can help in tackling them. Often, the ancient Greeks were able to present their (and our) concerns with an immediacy that startles for its penetration to the core of the matter.

This course proceeds through a variety of readings from ancient authors, plus occasional analyses by modern scholars, in a way that it is hoped will please and enlighten students curious about the nature of the Greeks' accomplishment. A mid-term, final, and two papers totaling 2,500 words are the only stumbling-blocks along the way.


LTWL 87 - FRESHMAN SEMINAR
Vampires in Literature and Film

Instructor: Lisa Lampert-Weissig

We will examine the portrayal of vampires in a series of films ranging from Murnau's 1922 classic Nosferatu to the shows like True Blood and the Vampire Diaries. How has the representation of vampires changed over the years? Students will watch the films outside of class to prepare for our discussions. Visit http://talesofthenight.com for more information.


LTWL 100 - MYTHOLOGY
Myths of the Ancient Greeks and Romans
Instructor: Page duBois

Gods, goddesses, heroes and queens, Amazons and monsters---the fabulous creatures of the classical world, many once divine, persist as myth into our present. The course will explore the pleasures of stories told of these characters from ancient Greece and Rome, in poetry and tragedy, and their survival into the Renaissance and the present. Readings include Homer's Odyssey, the Theogony, The Homeric Hymns, two Athenian tragedies, Alcestis and the Bacchae, Ovid's Metamorphoses, Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream, and a contemporary novel, Gods Behaving Badly.


LTWL 116 - ADOLESCENT LITERATURE
Learning to tell our stories

Instructor: Stephanie Jed

One purpose of “adolescent” or “young adult” literature is to give us an opportunity to uncover the stories of our own lives, moments of danger and possibility, hunger and love, suffering and hope. In this course, we will start with the fairytales that feature “adolescents” and then study both popular and classic texts from The Hunger Games and Enders Game to Baldwin’s Go Tell it on the Mountain and L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time.

 LTWL 116 is an LTEN equivalent course. 


LTWL 157 - IRANIAN FILM
Instructor: Babak Rahimi

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWL 158C - TOPICS IN OTHER CHRISTIANITIES
Instructor: Dayna Kalleres

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWL 183 - FILM STUDIES AND LITERATURE: DIRECTOR'S WORK
Relationships in Cinema
Instructor: Alain Cohen

Films about “relationships” may represent a quasi “genre” in the history of cinema. This course will vet the psychology and æsthetics of modern/postmodern “relationships.”

Filmmakers have found myriad ways of presenting more or less convoluted relationships —couples meet, love, fight, part, meet again, in the everyday as well as during war and other traumatic circumstances— and have challenged us with their creative portrayals of atttachments. Excerpts from classics or cult films will highlight conflicted relationship entanglements. Clips will include excerpts from Mike Nichols's Closer (2004), his masterpiece about  crisscrossing couples – played by C. Owens, J. Roberts, N. Portman and J. Law–, contrasted with his cult film Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), F. Truffaut’s French New Wave classic and cult film Jules & Jim, Woody Allen’s self-destructive characters in his classic Manhattan (1979) contrasted with his later and stylistic Celebrity (1998), or his morally tragi-comic Match Point (2005), David Lynch’s identity and gender identity crisis in Lost Highway (1997) and Mulholland Drive (2001), Stanley Kubrick’s study of the aggressive use of dreams and fantasies in Eyes Wide Shut (1999), Lisa Cholodenko's tortured women lovers in High Art (1998), Paul Schrader’s postmodern lovers lost in an uncanny Venice in The Comfort of Strangers (1990).

Excerpts and a few other clips from more current films will also be included.

As usual, precise methods of film analysis – frame and shot composition, shot-by-shot analysis, narrative programs, filmic figures, film genre,  deep structure, integration of specific films into the history of cinema, and filmic poetics – will be emphasized during the first weeks of the term. Students will explore the case of the compelling effect of /Relationships/ films in their cinematic and psychological interweave. “Veteran” students will be asked for work building upon their previous research.

 LTWL 183 is an LTEN equivalent course. 


LTWL 184 - FILM STUDIES AND LITERATURE: CLOSE ANALYSIS OF FILMIC TEXT
New Latin American Cinema

Instructor: Jacobo Myerston

In this course you will learn how to understand Latin American culture through film. This region of successful and failed emancipatory movements is one of the most culturally diverse parts of the world, but nevertheless it is plagued by problems of social inequality and cultural dependency from global centers of powers.  But despite the global forces that push the South of the Americas to the margins of the representation of the new global society, Latin American film has always been a tool for denouncing hegemonic modes of thought and for exploring social utopias in which cultural emancipation replaces dependency and oppression.   Throughout the course, then, we will get to know different critical Latin American discourses of Modernity as they are represented in the new the Latin American independent cinema.  

Course requirement: a presentation and one final research paper. There is no final exam for this course.

 LTWL 184 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


Read before signing up for LTWR courses: Enrollment in Literature Writing Courses


LTWR 8B - WRITING: POETRY 
Instructor: Ben Doller

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWR 8C - WRITING NONFICTION
Instructor: Camille Forbes

This course focuses on “creative” or “literary” nonfiction, studying two specific forms: the interview and the memoir essay. Our focus will be mainly on reading and discussing works of nonfiction, although we will cover relevant terms and practices generally related to writing and craft. Throughout the quarter, our discussions in lecture and section will serve as a springboard for individual work on the two key assignments in each of the previously-mentioned nonfiction forms.


LTWR 106 - SCIENCE FICTION, FANTASY, AND IRREALISM WORKSHOP
Instructor: Danielle Pafunda

Speculation and worldbuilding help us to imagine extraordinary futures, alternative presents, and more tangible pasts. In this hybrid genre course, we welcome monsters, ghouls, witches, vivid experiment, the 24th C, multiverses, telekinesis, empathetic magic, the midnight zone, all moons, curses, fates, fabular creatures, fable-worthy triumphs, collapse, expansivity, and more. Course texts include Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2017, Mothership: Tales From Afrofuturism and Beyond, Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, and other secondary texts.


LTWR 113 - INTERCULTURAL WRITING WORKSHOP
Outlaws and Outcasts: Writing in the Vein of a Rebel

Instructor: Melissa Bañales

Bukowski once said, "If you haven't written anything that your parents or the establishment don't like, you're not really trying." It's this very attitude that has been responsible for some of the most dangerous, experimental, progressive, passionate, and necessary writing that has had the power to shape culture, create communities of survival, and change perspectives. Being a rebel encourages us to be honest at all costs and when writing is that honest it has the power to do more than just change minds but leave a lasting cultural impact. This course will engage with a variety of outlaw, outcast, and underground writing counter-cultures in contemporary US and the writers (or rather, rebels) that established and thrived within them. We will use this knowledge to experiment with different forms that these writers engage(d) in, as well as the themes they hold, within our own writing. We will explore what makes a counter-culture movement, what it means to be an outlaw or outcast (even amongst the rebels), and some of the fundamental elements that give this writing the edge it is so famous for. This course is designed as an upper level undergraduate creative writing workshop and critical thinking Literature course, where fifty percent will be workshop of our own creative writing developed during the course, twenty-five percent will be readings, discussions, and guest speakers, and twenty-five percent will be a final consisting of a complete body of work or excerpt from a longer work (novel/stories/essays, poems, one-act or play, zine, or short or long screenplay). By studying and playing with the various forms of these writers we will better understand the urgency and honesty of their work as well as how those attitudes can influence our own writing. By the end of the quarter, successful students in this course will have a small, strong sample of creative work not just for the course final but for future use as well. The five ‘outlaw’ cultures we will explore this quarter are: WOC Writers; Zines & Small Presses; Slam, Spoken-Word, & Renegade Performance; Experimental Writing & Cross-Genre; and Erotica. Readings will be made available online and in-class and you must have reliable access to the internet to participate fully.


LTWR 114 - GRAPHIC TEXTS WORKSHOP
Instructor: Anna Joy Springer

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWR 115 - EXPERIMENTAL WRITING WORKSHOP
Instructor: Danielle Pafunda

This cross-genre course investigates contemporary experimental literatures through textual analysis and corresponding writing assignments, with minimal discussion of student drafts-in-progress. Readings and exercises emphasize the leap between knowing and doing as we consider the strategies of genre, potentials of form, flexibility of voices, and limit(lessness) of affect. Course texts include BAX 2016 Best American Experimental Writing, Mothership: Tales From Afrofuturism and Beyond, Lily Hoang’s Bestiary, and other secondary texts.


LTWR 126 - CREATIVE NONFICTION WORKSHOP
Instructor:Lily Hoang

Please contact instructor for course description.

LTWR 140 - HISTORY OF WRITING
Instructor: Stephanie Jed

We will learn in this course to understand writing (and thinking) as a series of relational and material practices and methods of making words with our hands. Beginning with a brief examination of the fields of manuscript studies and the history of the book, we will focus our attention on the manuscript materials in UCSD’s Archive for New Poetry. One important goal of this course is to become aware, through these studies, of our own writing practices.