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Literature Undergraduate Course Descriptions Winter 2017


LTAF 120 - LIT & FILM OF MODERN AFRICA
Persistent and Contemporary Themes of Struggle
Instructor: Robert Cancel

If we assume that for years the West has "written" Africa for not only westerners but for Africans as well, it is important to recognize the power of African artists who create their own personal and cultural representations. While political, historical and cultural themes developed by African writers and filmmakers are as varied as the continent itself, we will consider how history becomes mythologized and appropriated for various reasons by different artists. We will explore these many ideas and the forms they take, seeking to derive a means of description for understanding their content and context. We will employ literary texts as well as films and videos, fictional and documentary. Films will include the struggle against apartheid in South Africa and it’s complicated aftermath, women’s socio-political responses to traditional and contemporary patriarchal strictures, and the complex manifestations of Islamic assertions and forms of immigration. We will also consider the “location” of recent African writers who move comfortably between the West and Africa, often called “Afropolitans”.  The course will include lectures designed to provide background for the works assigned. 


LTCS 052 - TOPICS IN CULTURAL STUDIES
Sinophone Discourse: Chinese Cinema and Identity Performance
Instructor: Ping-hui Liao

This course is a lower division seminar in cultural studies.  It considers the recent emergence of Sinophone discourse around the shifting notions of China as a geopolitical entity and of Chinese culture as part of transnational lived experience.  We shall examine theories of Sinophone and Chinese Diaspora around issues of identity performance—gender, racial, national, transnational, translational, and so on. Our main focus will be on artists from a rich diversity of pan Chinese speaking communities, particularly on the ways in which they draw on multicultural heritage to develop new visions of being Chinese along the direction of linguistic innovation and literary imagination.  Students need to do 15-minute presentations on the lives and works of sinophone artists.  They will formulate as a group weekly questions and comments in response to reading materials.  A short paper outlining term project with annotated bibliography is due during the fourth week. The final paper should be cogently argued and meticulously documented; it is to turn in at the end of the quarter.

LTCS 130 - GENDER, RACE/ETHNICITY, CLASS, AND CULTURE
Race and New Media
Instructor: Hoang Nguyen

This course looks at the ways that race is central to how we understand and experience digital media. How is race differently constructed in old and new media? In what ways have new media enabled new identities and communities? How have people of color interacted with these new technologies? Our investigation of race and new media will be guided by the following key terms: racial formation, community, identity, sexuality, intimacy, interactivity, and activism. We will read a wide range of texts from different disciplines and fields of study. Our case studies will encompass social networking, YouTube, blogs, visual art, cyberpunk fiction, artists’ Web projects, narrative film, and reality TV. 

 
LTCS 130 is an LTEN equivalent course.


LTCS 133 - GLOBALIZATION AND CULTURE
International film and video.
Instructor: Winifred Woodhull

This discussion-intensive course will examine popular fictional films and videos (including original Netflix productions) as well as "art films" and documentaries dealing with the cultural and social dimensions of economic globalization both in the world's poorer countries (the global south) and in its wealthier ones (the global north).  Key issues will be the massive, ongoing movement of people, money, commodities, ideas, and cultural practices across regional and national boundaries, and the experiences of displacement and self-reinvention that this movement entails.  Depending on the availability and affordability of the materials when the quarter begins, examples of films to be studied may include Stephen Frears, Dirty, Pretty Things (UK), on the traffic in human organs and the exploitation of immigrants of color in Britain; Peter Berg, Deepwater Horizon (US) starring Mark Wahlberg, on the BP oil spill off the coast of New Orleans; Roel Reiné, Seal Team 8 (US), on a fight over weapons-grade uranium in the Democratic Republic of Congo; Laurent Cantet, The Class, on ethnic conflict in a diverse group of French youths; Mir-Jean Bou Chaya, Very Big Shot (Lebanon) on a small-time drug dealer; Mira Mair, Monsoon Wedding (India), on family relationships and sexuality among Indians and non-resident Indians who have emigrated abroad; and episodes from The X Files and other series.

Students will take an in-class midterm (two short essays) and a take-home final (a 5-page essay) in addition to a 5-page film analysis.


LTCS 172 -  SPECIAL TOPICS IN SCREENING RACE/ETHNICITY, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY
Asian American Film and Video
Instructor: Hoang Nguyen

The course explores the role of pleasure in the production, reception, and performance of Asian American identities in the mass media of film, video, and the Internet. As such, it participates in an emerging queer and feminist Asian American sexual archive that has been overlooked in queer and Asian American visual cultural studies. We will review the debates about stereotype criticism in Asian American media studies and go on to examine the “perverse” potentials of spectatorship that contest heteronormative criteria. The texts explored in the course alternate between those produced by majoritarian culture and the interventions made by Asian American filmmakers. We will investigate how pleasure, and pain,​ function in relation to both sets of texts and consider perspectives that cannot be reduced to uncritical celebration or righteous condemnation. Exploration of these issues will draw on theoretical developments in cultural studies, film studies, feminist theory, queer theory, and sexuality studies, alongside Asian American studies.

 LTCS 172 is an LTEN equivalent course.


LTEA 110A - CLASSICAL CHINESE FICTION IN TRANSLATION 
Traditional Chinese Stories
Instructor: Ping-hui Liao

In this course we will read a number of representative short stories from the Han dynasty to the late Qing, to examine ways in which “small talks” and tall tales shape Chinese novelistic discourses and cultural imaginaries.  We shall consider how these stories help constitute the essential components for human capabilities development in the pursuit of happiness, drawing on a set of traditional values and concept metaphors like “loyalty,” “filial piety,” “compassion,” and “justice” as the norms.  But as we read on, we often find the protagonists to be struggling under most demanding situations, always already tormented by adultery, avarice, betrayal, cruelty, deception, ingratitude, and many sorts of monstrosity.  Sometimes, it would be a female ghost, cunning vixen, or a thousand-year old serpent coming to the rescue--or making matters worse.  Gods and deities seem to have disappeared long ago.  Our main objective therefore is to share in class some intricate life lessons, as they testify to Chinese folk wisdoms and practical reasoning in time of crisis.  Subgenres like “chuan chi,” “bian wen,” “hua ben,” among others, will be discussed in their historical, philosophical, and trans-regional contexts.  Themes include the knight errant, heartless lover, femme fatale, ghost wife, dream adventure, justice, trickster, and so forth.  Materials will be in English translation, with originals in complex written characters reserved in a book form at Geisel Library.  Students have the option of writing commentaries either in English or in Chinese.  This course can be taken to fulfill the requirements for advanced Chinese.  

LTEA 120C - HONG KONG FILMS 
Films of Wong Kar-Wai.
Instructor: Ari Heinrich

This class surveys a number of the director’s works.  We will watch and write about a number of Wong’s films; read a range of secondary materials; and produce original critical writing about Wong’s oeuvre.  Non-US, Non-European.

 LTEA 120C will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTEA 140 - MODERN KOREAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION FROM COLONIAL PERIOD
Colonial Korea in Literary and Cinematic Representations
Instructor: Jin-Kyung Lee

This course traces modern Korean history of the colonial period (1910-1945) through examination of short fictions, novels and films produced between the first decade of Japanese rule and the 2010s.  Major issues we will examine through our reading of literary and filmic texts include the following: Japanese colonization, impact of Marxism, Cultural Nationalism, colonial diasporas, modernism and traditionalism, gender and coloniality/nationalism, the rise of mass culture and consumerism, collaboration and imperialization policies, and changing South Korean conceptualizations of the colonial history. We will attempt to re-think the emergence of “Korea” as a modern nation-state transnationally, i.e., in relation to the regional and global historical changes that include imperial dominations, colonial capitalization, dissemination of ideologies such as liberalism, Marxism and nationalism, and multi-directional flows of culture, commodities and people. In addition to literary texts from the 1910, 20s and 30s, we will also study films made in the late colonial period under the imperialization policy as well as the cinematic representations of colonial Korea produced in South Korea in the late 1990s and 2010s.  Our examination of South Korean cultural productions from recent years will allow us to conceptualize the historicity and changing significance of Japanese colonialism in the contemporary world.

 LTEA 140 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTEN 022 - INTRO/LIT OF THE BRITISH ISLES: 1832-PRES 
Instructor: Seth Lerer

This course surveys the major developments in British literature and culture from the period of the Restoration to the eve of Queen Victoria’s reign. It introduces students to the important periods and movements of Augustan aesthetics, eighteenth-century poetry and criticism, and Romanticism. In the course of the term we will explore the following themes and problems: what is the place of literature in the exercise of political rule; how do satire and parody develop as literary and social practices; how does drama change once women become actresses on stage; what is the relationship of taste to knowledge; what is a dictionary, an encyclopedia, a biography, and how do these forms emerge to codify cultural life and language; how do women give voice to a new literary subjectivity; and, ultimately, is poetry a social good? 


LTEN 029 - INTRO/CHICANO LITERATURE 
Instructor: Rosaura Sanchez

This course will serve as an introduction to Chicano/a - Latino/a literature and will address issues of history, labor and gentrification as represented in the literature.  In addition to the reading of several short narratives, students will be asked to read the following:  Rudolfo Anaya's Shaman Winter, Culture Clash's Chávez Ravine, Cherríe Moraga's Heroes and Saints, and Ernesto Quiñónez's Chango's Fire.  Students will also be asked to view two pertinent films.  In addition to attending lecture, students will participate in section, write two short papers and take a Mid Term and a Final Exam based on the readings and lectures.

LTEN 087 - FRESHMAN SEMINAR
Performing Stand-up Comedy
 
Instructor: Camille Forbes

Please contact instructor for course description.

LTEN 112 - SHAKESPEARE I:  THE ELIZABETHAN PERIOD (a
Instructor: Seth Lerer

This course introduces students to the work of Shakespeare in his first, great creative decade. It examines plays and poems written in the 1590s: the years when Queen Elizabeth I consolidated her power, when England established itself as a European naval force, when science and exploration began to challenge old beliefs and traditions, and when the study of the past became less a matter of legend and more a matter of history. We will focus close on five works written and circulated (though not necessarily first printed) in the 1590s: Romeo and Juliet, Henry IV Part I, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Julius Caesar, and the Sonnets. Each of these works says something powerful about Shakespeare’s imagination, about the social and political life of the time, and about the relationships between that time and the historical and the legendary past.


LTEN 142 - THE BRITISH NOVEL: 1830-1890 (b) 
Instructor: Margaret Loose

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTEN 149 - TOPICS: ENGLISH-LANGUAGE LITERATURE

The Global City in Film and Literature
Instructor: Ameeth Vijay

In this class we will read anglophone literature of the contemporary city, with a particular focus on how practices of colonialism and late capitalism continue to affect the ways in which urban life is produced, practiced and represented across the globe.  The contemporary, global city is not just physically constructed, but also constructed socially and in the imaginations of its inhabitants.  Thus, through a focus on literature, film, and art, we will examine both how the world's 'megacities' have been formed historically and also their aesthetic figuration and representation.    How does the modernist trope of the city continue to affect or not affect these global, postcolonial narratives?  In what ways are cities invested with symbolic value?  What makes a city "global," anyway?   We will also read key texts from cultural studies and geography to examine the role that urban spaces play in contemporary global politics.

 LTEN 149 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.

LTEN 159 - CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE
“It’s Only Rock ‘n’ Roll:” 1960s Popular Music in Cultural Context
Instructor: Robert Cancel

Contrary to current mythology, most popular music during the decade of the 1960s was neither revolutionary nor radically innovative.  Mainstream radio was mostly AM and the music industry controlled what was played and created for the teen audiences.  It was only in the later 1960s that innovations born of the rise of FM radio, national cultural politics, the confluence of several genres of music, and formerly underground publications began to change the shape of popular musical tastes.  We will consider music from the entire decade, reading not only histories of the industry and its performers, but also cultural criticism developed first by the emerging “rock press” of the late sixties and contemporary cultural studies looking back at that period. 

We will examine the roots of Rock ‘n’ Roll (including Blues, R&B, and Rockabilly), the musical streams of the decade (teen idols through surf music, the folk revival, the British Invasion, the San Francisco scene, guitar heroes, etc.), and also learn the economics of the industry and the major role played by record producers and song-writers.  Moreover, the political and economic history that shaped the decade will be seen as profoundly influencing the evolution of popular music and its reception.  Readings and listening will be combined with lectures and video material, and discussion will be highly encouraged in class.


LTEN 174 - AMERICAN FICTION II - SINCE MIDDLE JAMES (d)
Instructor: Michael Davidson

This course will be a survey of American prose fiction during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Our subtitle, “The Making of Americans,” refers to a long (very long!) novel by Gertrude Stein that describes the experience of first and second generation immigrants as they attempt to conform to what they imagine is American life. They discover, to adapt Simone de Beauvoir, that one is not born an American; one becomes one.  As the novels we will read attest, national identity is not a matter of having a passport or birth certificate; it is something learned, reinforced, and perhaps resisted. The issue of becoming a national citizen is a theme in all of the novels we will read, from Henry James’ Portrait of a Lady and Kate Chopin’s The Awakening to F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby and Nella Larsen’s Passing. At the same time issues of belonging and agency intersect with questions of race, gender and sexuality that will form a second theme in our course. We will study innovations in narrative form developed during this period—from the stream-of-consciousness narration of William Faulkner’s Sound and the Fury to the prose poetry of Jean Toomer’s Cane and the “Camera Eye” vignettes of John Dos Passos’ 42nd Parallel. This will be an intensive reading course, so students will need to factor their ability to keep up into their schedules. Evaluation will be based on in-class participation, a midterm paper, a final paper and weekly short responses. 

LTEN 175B - NEW AMERICAN POETRY - POST-WORLD WAR II TO THE PRESENT (d)
THE POEM in TIME
 
Instructor: Rae Armantrout

In this course we will study the dynamic relation between poetry and the changing social conditions in which it is written. In the almost 70 years since 1950, poets have responded not only to their literary predecessors but to turbulent circumstances and events such as the cold war, the civil rights movement(s), the sexual revolution, the war in Vietnam, the development of the digital age, globalization, and the ongoing "war on terror." We will consider the ways poets have reflected and even changed their world. Attention will be given to literary movements such as the Confessional Poets, the Beat Generation, the Black Arts Movement, the New American Poetry, Language Poetry, Neo-Confessionalism, and  Conceptual Writing as well as to a number of younger poets not (yet) affiliated with such groups. The course will end with a brief look at lyrics from recent pop songs. Students will write two papers, do an oral presentation, and be prepared for regular quizzes on the reading material. 


LTEN 178 - COMPARATIVE ETHNIC LITERATURE
Literary Responses to Trauma 

Instructor: Lisa Lampert-Weissig

In her acceptance speech for the Nobel Prize in Literature, Toni Morrison said “Language can never 'pin down' slavery, genocide, war. Nor should it yearn for the arrogance to be able to do so. Its force, its felicity, is in its reach toward the ineffable.” Despite the impossibility of “pinning down” slavery, genocide and war through language, writers have, nevertheless tried to convey the impact of atrocity, of collective trauma on groups and on individuals.

In this course students will read literary responses to war, genocide and slavery by individuals from several ethnic groups in the U.S.: African-Americans, Jewish-Americans, Vietnamese-Americans and Native Americans.  I have chosen the U.S. works below because they are each explorations of responses to collective trauma as it impacts the individual and family across generations.  These works represent experiences of those who are native to the U.S., those who immigrated here either willingly or as refugees and those who were brought here forcibly.  Each work engages with the experience of the ethnic group within the larger frame of the “American experience.” 

Another striking thing that the works covered in the course all share is their engagement with some form of the otherworldly, either through representation of the supernatural, the use of “magic realism” or, in the case of Octavia Butler’s science fiction novel about slavery, Kindred, exploration of time travel.  A focus on the fantastic, magic realism and experimental form will unite our readings and explorations. We will specifically consider the ways in which the authors we examine use literary form and the fantastic to attempt to convey extreme experiences both in the past and in the present day and how these literary choices affect the reader. 

Some of the readings planned are:  Isaac Bashevis Singer, Enemies, a Love Story (1972), Octavia Butler, Kindred (1979); Louise Erdrich, Love Medicine (1988); Toni Morrison, Beloved (1987); Art Spiegelman, Maus I and II (1991); Jonathan Safran Foer, Everything is Illuminated (2002); lê thi diem thúy, The Gangster We are All Looking For (2003); secondary readings on magical realism, collective memory and the fantastic


LTEN 181 - ASIAN AMERICAN LITERATURE (d)
Filipino Literature and Culture: Colonial, Postcolonial, and Diasporic Identities
Instructor: John Blanco

This course surveys the authors, intellectual currents, and cultural politics of Filipino culture from the colonial period to the twentieth century. Topics include the legacy of Spanish colonialism, European enlightenment, the role of the Philippines in the imagination and projection of American empire, decolonization, and Filipino literature in English.


LTEN 183 - AFRICAN AMERICAN PROSE (c)
Instructor: Dennis Childs 

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTEU 105 - MEDIEVAL STUDIES
Dante’s Journey and Our Own
Instructor: Stephanie Jed

Dante (and we, his readers) awaken in the dark wood of Inferno.  We know that we are lost, that we cannot ignore the "beasts" we encounter, but must experience suffering, hopelessness, alienation, deceit, and betrayal within ourselves.  We are overcome by suffering and a fear "so bitter it is close to death" (Tant’è amara che poco è più morte). We will journey with Dante through Inferno and sections of Purgatorio and Paradiso, exploring the meaning his journey holds for us, enduring the pain of gruesome suffering and hopelessness, savoring the grace involved in hard work, finally experiencing the “curved space” of a universe in which concepts and words no longer serve. 

We will use bilingual texts.  No previous knowledge of Italian is necessary.


LTFR 002B - INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II 
Instructor: TAs Supervised by Catherine Ploye

Plays from the 19th and 20th centuries as well as movies are studied to strengthen the skills developed in LTFR 2A. Includes a grammar review. Taught entirely in French. May be applied towards a minor in French literature or towards fulfilling the secondary literature requirement. Prerequisite:  LTFR 2A or equivalent or a score of 4 on the AP French language exam.


LTFR 002C - INTERMEDIATE FRENCH III 
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

Emphasizes the development of effective communication in writing and speaking. Includes a grammar review. A contemporary novel and a film are studied to explore cultural and social issues in France today. Taught entirely in French. May be applied towards a minor in French literature or towards fulfilling the secondary literature requirement. Students who have completed 2C or 50 can register in upper-level courses. Prerequisite: LTFR 2B or equivalent or a score of 5 on the AP French language exam.


LTFR 121 - THE MIDDLE AGES AND THE RENAISSANCE 
Instructor: Oumelbanine Zhiri

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTFR 142 - TOPICS IN LITERARY GENRES IN FRENCH
Vampires et loups-garous: le fantastique du XIXe siècle à nos jours.
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

A partir de textes des 19e et 20e siècles, nous mettrons en évidence les caractéristiques du fantastique tel qu’il se développe au 19e siècle puis suivrons quelques-unes de ses réincarnations dans des romans et films plus récents.  

Le cours sera enseigné en français. Auteurs possibles: Gautier, Maupassant, Cocteau, Darrieussecq…

Prerequisites: 115 or 116 or equivalent or consent of instructor.


LTGK 002 - INTERMEDIATE GREEK I 
Instructor: Leslie Edwards

In the second quarter of first-year Attic Greek, we'll continue to work through Shelmerdine's Introduction to Greek.  Passages of Greek will be longer, more complicated, but also more rewarding.  There will be quizzes, a midterm, and a final.  Prerequisite:  Greek 1 or the equivalent.


LTGK 102 - GREEK POETRY 
Instructor: Kourtney Murray

In the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, the titular goddess is portrayed as a figure who possesses a very particular set of skills, skills she has acquired over a very long career overseeing the growth of grain and the fertility of earth, skills that make her a nightmare not only for the god that kidnapped her daughter, but for the family of mortals that took her in during her time of grief and allowed her to watch over their young son.  In this course, we will read the hymn in Greek to better understand these skills while also striving for a glimpse into the mysterious realm of ancient Greek religion.  On a less sublime level, this course will provide an opportunity for students trained in later Greek dialects to gain experience of the particular joys of Homeric Greek; those already familiar with Homeric Greek will simply become much more adept at recognizing uncontracted verbs and devising their own personal Homeric epithets.  Grading will be based on a mid-term, paper, and final.  

LTGM 002B - INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II 
Instructor: Jeannette Mohr

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTGM 132 - GERMAN POETRY
Poetry and Pleasure
Instructor: William O'Brien

This is a course about poetry and pleasure.  Together, we’ll read a small number of short poems to enjoy a simple fact: Reading poetry is not just fun, but a pleasure—which is a whole lot better….

Until recently, reading poetry was understood to be one of life’s great pleasures.  Why else read it?  Yet for most of us, high school killed that pleasure dead in its tracks!  Now it seems, when we absolutely must read a poem, that somebody (the author?) is playing a dirty trick on us, keeping us in the dark about some ‘hidden meaning’—until some helpful authority (such as the high-school teacher) explains the poem’s ‘symbols,’ or some other stupid ‘keys,’ to us.  Then we can relax again, at least a little.  How awful!

Poetry is a lot better than that!  It’s about pleasure: the pleasures of reading poetry, a kind of writing that begins with pleasure—even forbidden pleasures!—and seeks to make more pleasure for the reader.   Of course, that’s why poetry and pleasure are both considered ‘dangerous,’ and that’s why their pleasures are stolen from us early on by ‘authorities’: Pleasure is contagious, and it’s hard to contain pleasure. Pleasure is dangerous.

This course is about regaining pleasure, and we will enjoy our pleasures in two ways.  First, we will recapture the pleasures of reading poetry, reading it on the page and reading it aloud. (A simple example: didn’t you love rhymes as a child?)  Secondly, we will read poetry that is about pleasure, about the pleasures of life, the pleasures of being alive: the pleasures of nature, social pleasures, sexual pleasure, intellectual pleasure, and even some less ‘pretty’ pleasures, maybe some ‘evil’ pleasures.

In terms of language level, poetry is the place to go if you still have a relatively small German vocabulary, but a fairly good sense of grammar.  (After all, there are fewer words to look up in a poem.)  At the other extreme, poetry is an endless source of pleasure if your German is perfect.  In either case, poetry also gives you a quick overview of German culture and history.  It’s a place for conservatives, moderates, rebels, and decadents alike—those who enjoy their history and culture, and those who rebel against it.  Poetry is a place to practice critical thinking, perhaps even the best place—and thus extremely practical.

We will read short poems by authors from the 18th century to the present, including Goethe, Rilke, Benn, Brecht, Novalis, and others.  We’ll make sure we enjoy reading them, we’ll learn about life’s pleasures, and—believe it or not!—we will come to enjoy talking about and even writing about poetry.

Poems in German.  Discussion and writing in English or German, as is your pleasure. Three short papers.


LTIT 002B - INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II 
Instructor: Adriana De Marchi Gherini

Italian language and culture. Grammar, movies, food and music. 4 days, 5 units. 


LTIT 115 - MEDIEVAL STUDIES
Dante’s Journey and Our Own
Instructor: Stephanie Jed

Dante (and we, his readers) awaken in the dark wood of Inferno.  We know that we are lost, that we cannot ignore the "beasts" we encounter, but must experience suffering, hopelessness, alienation, deceit, and betrayal within ourselves.  We are overcome by suffering and a fear "so bitter it is close to death" (Tant’è amara che poco è più morte). We will journey with Dante through Inferno and sections of Purgatorio and Paradiso, exploring the meaning his journey holds for us, enduring the pain of gruesome suffering and hopelessness, savoring the grace involved in hard work, finally experiencing the “curved space” of a universe in which concepts and words no longer serve.  

We will use bilingual texts.  No previous knowledge of Italian is necessary.


For more information about the UCSD Korean Language Program please visit: http://ucsdkoreanlanguage.blogspot.com/


LTKO 001B - BEGINNING KOREAN:FIRST YR. II 
Instructor: TAs Supervised by Jeyseon Lee

First Year Korean 1B (5 units) is the second part of the Beginning Korean series. This course is designed to assist students to develop mid-beginning level skills in the Korean language. These skills are speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as cultural understanding. LTKO 1B is designed for students who have already mastered the materials covered in LTKO 1A or who are already in the equivalent proficiency level. This course will focus on grammatical patterns, such as sentence structures, some simple grammatical points, and some survival level use of the Korean language. Additionally, speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension will all be emphasized, with special attention to oral speech. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following in Korean: 

First Year Korean 1B (5 units) is the second part of the Beginning Korean series. This course is designed to assist students to develop mid-beginning level skills in the Korean language. These skills are speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as cultural understanding. LTKO 1B is designed for students who have already mastered the materials covered in LTKO 1A or who are already in the equivalent proficiency level. This course will focus on grammatical patterns, such as sentence structures, some simple grammatical points, and some survival level use of the Korean language. Additionally, speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension will all be emphasized, with special attention to oral speech. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following in Korean:                                                                                   

Speaking: Students are able to handle successfully a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks in straightforward social situations. Conversation is generally limited to those predictable and concrete exchange necessary for survival in the target culture. They are capable of asking a variety of questions when necessary to obtain simple information to satisfy basic needs.

Listening: Students are able to understand simple, sentence-length speech, one utterance at a time, in variety of basic personal and social contexts. Comprehension is most often accurate with highly familiar and predictable topics although a few misunderstandings may occur.

Reading: Students are able to understand short, non-complex texts that convey basic information and deal with basic personal and social topics to which they bring personal interest or knowledge, although some misunderstandings may occur. They may get some meaning from short connected texts featuring description and narration, dealing with familiar topics.

Writing: Students are able to meet a number of practical writing needs. They can write short, simple communications, compositions, and requests for information in loosely connected texts about personal preferences, daily routines, common events, and other personal topics.

Pre-Requisite: LTKO 1A or equivalent level of Korean language proficiency


LTKO 002A - INTERMEDIATE KOREAN:2ND YR I 
Instructor: TAs Supervised by Jeyseon Lee

Second Year Korean 2A is the first part of the Intermediate Korean. Students in this course are assumed to have previous knowledge of Korean, which was taught in the Korean 1A, 1B, and 1C courses. Students in this course will learn low-intermediate level skills in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Korean, as well as expand their cultural understanding. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to acquire and use more vocabularies, expressions and sentence structures and to have a good command of Korean in various conversational situations. Students are expected to write short essays using the vocabularies, expressions, and sentence structures introduced. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following in Korean:                                                                               

Speaking: Students are able to handle a variety of communicative tasks. They are able to participate in most informal and some formal conversations on topics related to school, home, and leisure activities. Students demonstrate the ability to narrate and describe in the major time frames in paragraph-length discourse. They show the ability  to combine and link sentences into connected discourse of paragraph length.

Listening: Students are able to understand short conventional narrative and descriptive texts with a clear underlying structure though their comprehension may uneven. They understand the main facts and some supporting details. Comprehension may often derive primarily from situation and subject-matter knowledge.

Reading: Students are able to understand conventional narrative and descriptive texts with a clear underlying structure though their comprehension may be uneven. These texts predominantly contain high-frequency vocabulary and structure. Students understand the main ideas and some supporting details. Comprehension may often derive primarily from situational and subject-matter knowledge.

Writing: Students are able to meet basic work and/or academic writing needs. They are able to compose simple summaries on familiar topics. They are able to combine and link sentences into texts of paragraph length and structure. They demonstrate the ability to incorporate a limited number of cohesive devices.

Pre-Requisite: LTKO 1C or equivalent level of Korean language proficiency


LTKO 002B - INTERMEDIATE KOREAN:SECOND YR 
Instructor: TAs Supervised by Jeyseon Lee

Second Year Korean 2B (5 units) is the second part of the Intermediate Korean. Students in this course are assumed to have previous knowledge of Korean, which was taught during the Korean 1A, 1B, 1C, and 2A courses. Students in this course will learn mid-intermediate level of standard modern Korean in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as expand their cultural understanding. After the completion of this course, students are expected to acquire and use more vocabularies, expressions, and sentence structures and to have a good command of Korean in various conversational situations. Students are also expected to write short essays using the vocabularies, expressions, and sentence structures introduced. Upon completion of this course, students will become able to do the following in Korean: 

Speaking: Students are able to handle with ease and confidence a large number of communicative tasks. They participate actively in most informal and some formal exchanges on a variety of concrete topics relating to work, school, home, and leisure activities, as well as topics relating to events of current, public, and personal interest or individual relevance.

Listening: Students are able to understand conventional narrative and descriptive texts, such as extended descriptions of persons, places, and things, and narrations about past, present, and future events. The speech is predominantly in familiar target-language patterns. They understand the main facts and many supporting details.

Reading: Students are able to understand conventional narrative and descriptive texts, such as extended descriptions of persons, places, and things an narrations about past, present, and future events. They understand the main ideas, facts and many supporting details. Students my derive some meaning from texts that are structurally and/or conceptually more complex.

Writing: Students are able to meet a range of work and/or academic writing needs. They are able to write straightforward summaries on topics of general interest. There is good control of the most frequently used target-language syntactic structure and a range of general vocabulary.

Pre-Requisite: LTKO 2A or equivalent level of Korean language proficiency                                  


LTKO 149 - READINGS IN KOREAN LANGUAGE HISTORY & STRUCTURE 
Instructor: Jeyseon Lee

This course is designed to develop cultural understanding and professional/academic level reading skill for students with coverage of materials on Korean language history from the 5th century to the present, previous and current writing systems, and Korean language structure. This is a Korean cultural/literature topics course designed for students to understand Korean language history and structure. Readings in Korean Language History and Structure Part I focuses on Korean language history and writing systems; Readings in Korean Language History and Structure Part II focuses on Korean language sound system and word formation system; Readings in Korean Language History and Structure Part III focuses on Korean language grammar system and meaning change.

LTKO 149 Readings in Korean Language History and Structure in 2017 winter quarter focuses on Korean language grammar system and meaning change.

Course pre-requisites: LTKO 3 or equivalent.


LTLA 002 - INTERMEDIATE LATIN I 
Instructor: Eliot Wirshbo

Trudging through the middle part of the Oxford Latin Primer will be a lark: we'll make dioramas, act out some of the sentences involving gladiatorial combats, play Latin charades, blog Latinly, and present some of Seneca's closet dramas. But seriously, folks: more of the same, just piled higher and deeper. The familiar routine will feature quizzes, grammatical inquests, etymological gems, trips to the board, a mid-term, nightly burdens/homework that tax the brain -- the whole panoply of sufferings that make Latin a unique educational experience. There should be, however, some sense of accomplishment from the simple process of cracking a dense and initially unyielding sentence. Multiply this by hundreds and you have a course description for elementary Latin.


LTLA 002 - INTERMEDIATE LATIN I 
Instructor: Leslie Edwards

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTLA 105 - TOPICS IN LATIN LITERATURE 
Instructor: Eliot Wirshbo

The text for this course will be the fourth book of Vergil's Aeneid. The cognoscenti will recognize this as one of Vergil's more famous and disturbing books, the one that features the 'problematic' love affair and break-up of Dido and Aeneas. This maddening (for Dido and us) and saddening (for Aeneas and us) episode contains elements that have inspired still-stimulating discussion: about boy-girl relations in antiquity and now, about Vergil's debt to his Greek predecessors, on the rhetorical give-and-take involved in hammering out irrevocable differences, on the ever-fraught balance between one's inner and one's outer lives. Really, this course should be taught by Dr. Phil or Dr. Oz, so vital to our daily lives is its import. The usual exams and paper will flavor the course, whose odoriferous essence will only be picked up by daily attendance.


LTRU 001B - FIRST-YEAR RUSSIAN 
Instructor: Rebecca Wells

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTRU 002B - SECOND-YEAR RUSSIAN 
Instructor: Rebecca Wells

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTRU 104C - ADVANCED PRACTICUM IN RUSSIAN 
Instructor: Rebecca Wells

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTSP 002B - READINGS & INTERPRETATIONS 
Instructor: TAs Supervised by Beatrice Pita

This intermediate course is designed for students who wish to improve their grammatical competence, ability to speak, read and write Spanish. It is a continuation of LTSP 2A with special emphasis on problems in writing and interpretation. Students meet with the instructor 4 days per week. Work for this 5 unit course includes oral presentations, grammar review, writing assignments, class discussions on the readings and work with Spanish-language video and Internet materials. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisites: Completion of LTSP 2A, its equivalent, or a score of 4 on the AP Spanish language exam.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2B is scheduled for SATURDAY, MARCH 18th, 2017. Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with any questions regarding placement.

LTSP 002C - CULTURAL READINGS&COMPOSITION 
Instructor: TAs Supervised by Beatrice Pita

The goal of this intermediate language course is twofold: to further develop all skill areas in Spanish and to increase Spanish language-based cultural literacy. LTSP 2C is a continuation of the LTSP second-year sequence with special emphasis on problems in grammar, writing and translation. It includes class discussions of cultural topics as well as grammar review and composition assignments. The course will further develop the ability to read articles, essays and longer pieces of fictional and non-fictional texts as well as the understanding of Spanish-language materials on the Internet. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisite: Completion of LTSP 2B, its equivalent, or a score of 5 on the AP Spanish language exam. This course satisfies the third course requirement of the collegerequired language sequence as well as the language requirement for participation in UCEAP.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2C is scheduled for SATURDAY, MARCH 18th, 2017. Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 002D - INTER/ADV SPANISH 
Spanish for heritage speakers I
Instructor: TAs Supervised by Beatrice Pita

Designed for bilingual students who have been exposed to Spanish at home but have little or no formal training in Spanish. The goal is for students who are comfortable understanding, reading and speaking in Spanish to further develop existing skills and to acquire greater oral fluency, and grammatical control through grammar review, and reading and writing practice. Building on existing strengths, the course will allow students to develop a variety of Spanish language strategies to express themselves in Spanish with greater ease and precision. Prepares native-speakers for more advanced courses. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisite: Native speaking ability and/or recommendation of instructor. 

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2D is scheduled for SATURDAY, MARCH 18th, 2017. Enrollment for LTSP 2D requires department pre-authorization; contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 002E - ADVNCD READINGS/COMPOSITION 
Spanish for heritage speakers II
Instructor: Beatrice Pita

An advanced/intermediate course designed for bilingual students who may or may not have studied Spanish formally, but possess good oral skills and seek to become fully bilingual and biliterate. Reading and writing skills stressed with special emphasis on improvement of written expression, vocabulary development and problems of grammar and orthography. Prepares native-speakers with a higher level of oral proficiency for more advanced courses. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisite: Native speaking ability and/or recommendation of instructor. 

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2E is scheduled for SATURDAY, MARCH 18th, 2017. Enrollment for LTSP 2E requires department pre-authorization; contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 050B - READINGS/LATIN AMER LITERATURE 
Instructor: TAs Supervised by Beatrice Pita

This course introduces students to cultural analysis through the close textual reading of a selection of Latin American texts including novels, plays, short fiction and poetry. Coursework includes reading of texts, participation in class discussions and written assignments. LTSP 50B prepares Literature majors and minors for upper-division work. Two classes from the LTSP 50ABC series (any two) are required for Spanish Literature majors. May be applied towards a minor in Spanish Literature or towards fulfilling the second literature requirement for Literature majors. Prerequisites: Completion of LTSP 2C, 2D, 2E or 2 years of college level Spanish.

Notes: The Final Exam for LTSP 50B is scheduled for SATURDAY, MARCH 18th, 2017. Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 135A - MEXICAN LITERATURE BEFORE 1900 
Instructor: Max Parra

Curso de introducción a la literatura mexicana desde el siglo XVII hasta los inicios del siglo XX. Empezaremos con textos representativos del período Colonial, para luego concentrarnos en el largo siglo XIX (1780-1910, aproximadamente) y examinar la relación entre la literatura y la formación de la nación moderna. ¿Qué grupos, sociales o étnicos, pertenecen a la nación? ¿quiénes deber ser excluidos? ¿en qué consiste la identidad nacional? serán algunas de las preguntas a responder a través de las lecturas. Atenderemos también el papel del periodismo y el folletín, la tradición didáctica y la histórica, en la producción literaria. Leeremos obras en prosa, verso, crónicas y ensayos, asi como algunos textos visuales (mapas, fotografías). La lista de lecturas incluye obras de Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, José Joaquín Fernández de Lizardi, Ignacio Manuel Altamirano, Manuel Gutiérrez Nájera, et al. Curso de lectura intensiva.

Course fulfills Spanish major requirement (pre-1900 literature)

 LTSP 135A will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTSP 136 - ANDEAN LITERATURES 
El indigenismo andino
Instructor: Milos Kokotovic

En este curso vamos a leer ensayos, cuentos, y novelas indigenistas del Perú y Ecuador.  Escritas en un período de rápida modernización entre 1920 y 1970, estas obras denuncian la explotación y abuso de los pueblos indígenas del Perú Ecuador por los grandes terratenientes, las empresas transnacionales y los representantes del estado. Aunque intentaron representar y defender los intereses de los pueblos indígenas, los autores indigenista no eran indios.  Eran, más bien, intelectuales mestizos de provincia que usaron la literatura para criticar y desafiar el poder de las elites criollas y así promover sus propios intereses tanto como los de las comunidades indígenas que buscaban representar (en ambos sentidos de esta palabra: tanto política como literariamente). Vamos a analizar las formas literarias que estos autores usaron para representar las diferencias culturales y los conflictos étnicos y de clase social provocados por la modernización en el Perú y Ecuador durante la primera mitad del siglo XX. 

 LTSP 136 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTSP 138 - CENTRAL AMERICAN LITERATURE 
LA NARRATIVA CENTROAMERICANA DE LA POSGUERRA
Instructor: Milos Kokotovic

En este curso vamos a leer obras centroamericanas escritas en los 1990s y 2000s, después de las guerras civiles en Guatemala, El Salvador y Nicaragua.  Los acuerdos de paz que pusieron fin a estas guerras cambiaron muy poco las profundas desigualdades que motivaron la lucha armada de los 1970s y 1980s.  De hecho, la desigualdad socioeconómica en Centroamérica sigue siendo tan extrema hoy como hace 40 años.  Por otra parte, en vez de disminuir, la violencia simplemente ha cambiado de forma: la violencia criminal alimentada por la pobreza y el narcotráfico ha sustituido a las guerras civiles entre derecha e izquierda.  En este contexto, los principales géneros literarios de los años de la guerra, la poesía comprometida y el testimonio, han cedido lugar a una nueva ficción narrativa que critica tanto los proyectos utópicos de la izquierda revolucionaria de los 1970s y 1980s como las políticas económicas neoliberales de los gobiernos derechistas de la posguerra.  En este curso vamos a estudiar cómo representan estas obras temas como la reintegración de los ex-combatientes desmovilizados a la vida civil; los nuevos espacios políticos y culturales abiertos por las mujeres durante la guerra, y su resistencia a los intentos de cerrar estos espacios en la posguerra; el legado del genocidio perpetrado en contra de los Maya por el gobierno guatemalteco; los efectos del neoliberalismo y el crecimiento del narcotráfico.  Analizaremos cómo la ficción centroamericana de los 1990s y 2000s ha representado la experiencia de la vida bajo el nuevo orden neoliberal, y cómo en estas nuevas condiciones sociales han surgido nuevas formas de representación literaria.  También veremos un par de películas sobre la migración Centroamericana a los Estados Unidos.

 LTSP 138 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTSP 166 - CREATIVE WRITING
Instructor: Rosaura Sanchez

This creative writing course will introduce students to theoretical commentaries on the short story genre by master narrators Piglia, Cortázar, Quiroga, and García Márquez that will serve as a framework for analyzing the short story form in four Latin American short stories.  Thereafter, students will be asked to write at least three short stories in Spanish inspired by the studied forms, but experimentation and creativity will be encouraged.  Students' narratives will be presented to the class and discussed collectively.


LTTH 115 - INTRODUCTION TO CRITICAL THEORY
Instructor: Daniel Vitkus

This course offers an introduction to the most important concepts and critical issues in literary studies today.  We will be discussing, not just literature, but literary theory and critical methodology. The study of literary theory will lead us to explore exciting, foundational questions having to do with textual interpretation, cultural production, and the making of meaning. Students will learn about the most important schools of recent and contemporary literary theory and then apply these theories to the interpretation of literature and other cultural productions. We will ask not only “What do these texts mean?” but also “How do they mean?” Some of the other questions we will raise and discuss include the following: what is “literature”? What is the purpose and function of literary studies? How do we determine what a text means? Where does meaning reside—in the author, the reader, or the text? What is the relationship between literature and society? Between text and historical context? Our study of critical theory will help us to understand the ways in which literature and culture both respond to and shape the world around us.

LTWL 087 - FRESHMAN SEMINAR
Zombies: An Unnatural History

Instructor: Lisa Lampert-Weissig

Why are zombies so popular right now? Is the current craze just mindless fun or are there political and social subtexts to consider? We'll examine the origins of the zombie figure, zombie films of the 1930s and 40s, George Romero's Night of the Living Dead (1968), The Walking Dead and World War Z. More information at www.talesofthenight.org


LTWL 019B - INTRO/ANCIENT GREEKS & ROMANS
Instructor: Eliot Wirshbo

How 'bout them Greeks? Were they not all geniuses, or at least genii? Did they not, when taking time from killing their enemies in slow motion, think deep thoughts about the nature of Being? And what about those crazy gods and goddesses? Does this not prove that, for all their famous philosophizing, they were deeply, maybe even tragically, flawed? And so many of them were mean old defenders of the patriarchy, were they not? Not to mention all the rumors of homosexuality, which may very well have been rampant in those days.

This course will seek to raise the level of discourse around such subjects by delving into a variety of classical texts. From these materials, a greater sophistication about the enduring achievement of the Greeks of the classical period should accrue. With a catalog-imposed mandate to cover the great variety of Periclean Age Athens, we will present ourselves for bombardment with stimuli from historians, philosophers, tragedians, tragic and comic dramatists, and a bevy of wise guys known as sophists. Such exposure should at least render students incapable of repeating the claims of the first paragraph of this description; at most, it is hoped, students will come from the course with an appreciation of a culture whose influence on us continues to be felt and whose achievement deserves our admiration.

This electronics-free course features two five-page papers, a mid-term, and a final exam. Class attendance is necessary: no podcasts.


LTWL 100 - MYTHOLOGY 
Comparative World Mythology
Instructor: Page duBois

We will read the myths, that is, the ancient stories, of the world, from the ancient Greek and Roman to the Norse, Korean, Chinese and Vietnamese, Aztec, Maya, and Pacific Islander, myths of Africa, Asia and the Americas. Among these amazing stories are myths of creation, of the female divine, of male gods and heroes, of tricksters, and sacred places. Literatures of the World 100 can be repeated for credit if the material covered, that is, the subtitle, differs.

Assigned text: Scott Leonard and Michael McClure, Myth & Knowing: An Introduction to World Mythology (available at UCSD Bookstore) 


LTWL 120 - POPULAR LITERATURE AND CULTURE 
Fantasy After Tolkien
Instructor: Stephen Potts

J. R. R. Tolkien changed the fantasy genre with his epic trilogy The Lord of the Rings, which became a cult phenomenon in the 1960s. Numerous imitations sprung up in the following decades, rooted in European medievalism and folk myth, leading ultimately to the current popularity of Harry Potter and Game of Thrones. However, the increased prominence of fantasy after Tolkien also produced a diverse range of authors, themes, and scenarios. This course will explore the modern genre through fantasy novels published since the 1970s. Some visit landscapes of myth and fairy tale--Asian and African as well as European; others take place in historical and modern settings, such as Jane Austen’s England or twentieth-century Las Vegas, or venture in realms of dream and nightmare. In the course of our readings and discussions, we will investigate the literary roots of fantasy, including cultural contexts and the values that inform any good work of fiction. 

 LTWL 120 is an LTEN equivalent course.


LTWL 135 - THE BUDDHIST IMAGINARY
Instructor: Richard Cohen

This class provides an introduction to Buddhist thought and practice. The material will be treated thematically — e.g., the connection between cosmological models and liberative practices; the conflict/symbiosis of wisdom and compassion; renunciation vs.accumulation of wealth — and temporally — the movement from early Buddhism to Mahayana to Tantra. Our sources will be Buddhist narrative and doctrinal literatures, supplemented by archaeological and art historical artifacts.

 LTWL 135 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTWL 143 - ARAB LITERATURES AND CULTURES 
Instructor: Oumelbanine Zhiri

Please contact instructor for course description.

 LTWL 143 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTWL 165 - LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT 
Instructor: Pasquale Verdicchio

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWL 168 - DEATH AND DESIRE IN INDIA 
Instructor: Richard Cohen

This class investigates the link between desire and death in classical and modern Hindu thought. In the most elementary formulation, this link is expressed as follows: Human beings are subject to death because they have desires; by controlling desire, human beings can escape death. This correlation between desire and death holds true for men and women alike, but it leads to disparate constructions of gender. Men are expected to practice self-control, while women are expected to submit themselves to the control of men.

To tease out the many cultural and intellectual dimensions of desire/death, this class treats the following topics: the relationship between the sexes; the construction of gender identities; practices associated with the reduction of sexual desire; practices associated with the arousal of sexual pleasure; practices associated with the harnessing of desire for the attainment of immortality (i.e., Tantra). We will investigate these issues by looking at stories of the Hindu gods (especially Rama, Krishna, and Shiva), as well as by looking at the lives of contemporary South Asian men and women, in literature and film.

 LTWL 168 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTWL 172 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE 
Heroes and Villains, from Ancient Times to Pokémon (and beyond)
Instructor: Adriana de Marchi Gherini

What is a hero?  How does a hero's character evolve?  Why is there often so much in common between a hero and a villain?  Is there really such a thing as a villain?  Fascinating patterns are found through different cultures, and in this course we will talk about works of literature and less traditional narratives, including animé, video games, film, and folk legends.  From the Classics, to Pokémon, via Star Wars, The Legend of Zelda and other texts we will try to identify the traits the Joseph Campbell saw as essential to the identity of the hero figure in all cultures.

"Mini" presentations, a longer presentation, and a final paper.

For more info, contact Adriana De Marchi Gherini: demarchi@ucsd.edu


Read before signing up for LTWR courses: Enrollment in Literature Writing Courses


LTWR 008B - WRITING: POETRY 
Instructor: Ben Doller

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWR 008C - WRITING NONFICTION
Instructor: Camille Forbes

This course introduces two forms of literary nonfiction: the interview and the memoir piece. Our focus will be mainly on reading and discussing these forms of nonfiction; we will also over relevant terms related to writing and craft. Throughout the quarter, our discussions will serve as a springboard for individual work on the two key assignments in each of the previously-mentioned nonfiction forms.


LTWR 100 - SHORT FICTION WORKSHOP
Reading Like a Writer

Instructor: Camille Forbes

In this course, students study, discuss, and create beautiful works of short fiction. First, you’ll go to the elegant works of authors present and past for inspiration and instruction, reading attentively. Then you'll take those golden nuggets, using them to enrich your approaches to writing. In this course, you will not only develop your own piece (one completed story required), but also focus on being a student and critic (in the very best sense) of the work of others.


LTWR 102 - POETRY WORKSHOP
Instructor: Ben Doller

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWR 104A - THE NOVELLA I
Instructor: Melvyn Freilicher

This two quarter sequence offers students the unique opportunity to focus intensively on writing a lengthy piece of fiction, to be accomplished in stages, beginning in winter and ending in spring quarter. During this period, students will read and critique several drafts of their peers’ work.  There will be quizzes and discussions on a number of novellas, including those by Nathanael West, Carson McCullers, Marguerite Duras, Tennessee Williams, Penelope Fitzgerald, Patrick Modiano, and others. NOTE: LTWR 104A is the first of a two part sequence, and students must commit to taking this course for both quarters this academic year.  At the conclusion of LTWR 104A, students will receive an “IP” (in progress) grade which will be resolved at the conclusion of LTWR 104B, to be offered in the spring.  Prerequisite:  LTWR 100.


LTWR 106 - SCIENCE FICTION, FANTASY, & IRREALISM WORKSHOP
A Field Guide To The Intersection Of The Real And Unreal
Instructor: Melissa Chadburn

What is real? What is unreal? Where do our ideas come from? How do images transfer from inside one person, become an external thing (picture, story, poem, jingle, play, rant, rap song) and then through an engagement is transferred to the inside someone else? Join me in a quarter of observing, writing, drawing by hand, until we arrive at the intersection between the real and unreal.

& put it in a story.


LTWR 110 - SCREEN WRITING WORKSHOP
The Art of Adaptation & Writing for the Viewer

Instructor: Melissa Bañales

Film critic for The New Yorker, Pauline Kael once wrote, “…Because movies are the most total and encompassing art form we have,…reactions (to them) can seem the most personal and, maybe the most important, imaginable.” Media has become the new storyteller of the 21st century. It is almost a survival skill now for writers to know, and actively engage with, media as well as create their own. Films themselves serve as excellent literary texts, which is no surprise since almost seventy percent of all films are actually adaptations of great works of Literature. This workshop will explore developing work for the screen through the lense of adaptation. Along with looking at successful adaptations, writers will learn the basic, technical fundamentals of writing a screenplay and teleplay (basic camera angles and language, shot lists, and other basics necessary to a standard screenplay or teleplay) as well as explore various exercises (writing and otherwise) to help develop original work. Writers will also examine how media influences history and culture and what their place will be in that conversation as screenwriters in the new millennium. This course is designed as an upper-level, Creative Writing workshop and critical thinking Literature course to engage beginners to seasoned script-writers. Writers will generate new work throughout the quarter, where fifty percent will be dedicated to workshopping creative work, twenty-five percent will be centered around readings, viewings, discussions, and guest speakers, and twenty-five percent will be a final work consisting of a significant portion of a feature-length screen work, a completed short film script, or completed short teleplay (TV script/episode). Successful adaptations and sources we will focus on this quarter are: The Color Purple, by Alice Walker; Fear & Loathing in Las Vegas, by Hunter S. Thompson; Life Is Wonderful, People Are Terrific, by Meliza Bañales; To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee; the screenwriting textbook by Robert McKee entitled Story; and The Twilight Zone television series. You must have regular access to the internet, YouTube, as well as a webcam or smartphone with recording capability to participate fully in the course. 

LTWR 113 - INTERCULTURAL WRITING WORKSHOP
Instructor: Gloria Chacon

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWR 148 - THEORY FOR WRITERS/WRITING FOR THEORY 
Art Writing.
Instructor: Ari Heinrich

A hands-on class in the theory of art criticism.  We'll read and discuss a range of examples of critical art writing, and also produce original works of art criticism.  Students may bring an existing project to develop and workshop, or they may start a project with guidance in class.  Permission of instructor required.


Persistent and Contemporary Themes of Struggle