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Literature Undergraduate Course Descriptions Winter 2016


LTAF 120 - LIT & FILM OF MODERN AFRICA 
Persistent and Contemporary Themes of Struggle
Instructor: Robert Cancel

If we assume that for years the West has "written" Africa for not only westerners but for Africans as well, it is important to recognize the power of African artists who create their own personal and cultural representations. While political, historical and cultural themes developed by African writers and filmmakers are as varied as the continent itself, we will consider how history becomes mythologized and appropriated for various reasons by different artists.  We will explore these many ideas and the forms they take, seeking to derive a means of description for understanding their content and context. This quarter we will employ a minimum of literary texts in favor of films and videos, fictional and documentary.  Films will include the struggle against apartheid in South Africa and it’s complicated aftermath, women’s socio-political responses to traditional and contemporary patriarchal strictures, and the complex manifestations of Islamic assertions and forms of immigration. The course will include lectures designed to provide background for the works assigned.  Several literary texts and films constitute our primary data. 


LTCH 101 - READINGS/CONTEMP CHINESE LIT 
Instructor: Ping-hui Liao

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTCS 050 - INTRO TO CULTURAL STUDIES 
Instructor: Pasquale Verdicchio

This course has been cancelled.


LTCS 131 - TOPICS IN QUEER CUL/QUEER SUBC
Queering Popular Culture
Instructor: Fatima El-Tayeb

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTCS 150 - TOPICS IN CULTURAL STUDIES 
Bob Dylan 
Instructor: William O'Brien

Bob Dylan: rock star, folk hero, songwriter, recording artist, recluse, live performer, bobdylan.com, sell-out, legend.

The production and practice of American pop music changed forever with the invention of Bob Dylan over 50 years ago.  Still performing today, Dylan has extended musical forms, confounded audiences, and transformed himself countless times.  He’s won Grammys, an Oscar, the Pulitzer Prize, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom

Centering on recorded performances, this course will investigate the phenomenon called Bob Dylan.  We will concentrate on his music from the earliest released recordings to the most recent work.  We will also watch Dylan on screen in the avant-garde film of 1965, Don’t Look Back, and the star-packed Masked and Anonymous of 2003.  We will always attend to the historical, political, economic, aesthetic, and cultural complexities of Dylan’s work.

All media available online.  You will need to download complete CDs and print their lyrics for study.  Some books will be recommended.

Requirements: Written responses to home listening and viewing, final paper, and final exam.  

LTCS 150 is a LTEN equivalent course


LTCS 170 - VISUAL CULTURE 
Japonisme from Painting to Cinema 
Instructor: Daisuke Miyao

Since the period of Impressionist paintings (Manet, Monet, van Gogh) of the 19th century to the digital age (cinema, anime, manga, PlayStation) of the 21st century, Japan has provided extremely attractive images to non-Japanese viewers and spectators.  European and American artists dreamed of an exotic land of geisha, samurai, and Mt. Fuji in the name of "Japonisme."  Japanese artists were aware of such Orientalist imaginations.  Focusing on writings and visual arts on Japan, this course examines how the culture of Japan was imagined and narrated.

LTCS 170 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTEA 110B - MODERN CHINESE FICTN/TRANSLTN 
One Hundred Years of Chinese Popular Culture (1898-1998) 
Instructor: Ari Heinrich

This course introduces the roots of Chinese popular culture in the late nineteenth and turn-of-the-twentieth centuries, with brief forays into contemporary popular culture.  Examining topics such as Chinese traditions of martial arts film and fiction, the early years of Chinese jazz, and the problem of popular vs. elite culture in the production of early Chinese pulp fiction and political propaganda in the early twentieth century, the course emphasizes a core understanding of historical and cultural context as well as theoretical approaches to the phenomenology of popular culture.

 Please note that this course will be reading and writing intensive.  In addition to weekly writing assignments, students will be expected to make two in-class presentations over the course of the quarter.  *Note that this course is flagged as 'Non-US, Non-European.'

LTEA 110B will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTEA 120B - TAIWAN FILMS 
Instructor: Ping-hui Liao

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTEA 142 - KOREAN FILM, LIT & POP CUL 
Pop Cultures of the Korean Peninsula 
Instructor: Jin-kyung Lee

This course examines various popular cultural productions such as films, music and music videos, and TV dramas, from modern Korea, including colonial Korea under the Japanese rule and North and South Koreas from the post-1945 era.  It is a survey of the key events and issues of the Korean peninsula in the modern era as represented by popular culture. We will pay attention to the following issues such as Japan’s war mobilization of Korea, the national division, the Korean War, authoritarianism, industrialization process, family and gender relations, recent multiethicization of South Korea, and K-Pop among others. For comparison, we will also include a few films from North Korea as well as South Korean and American representations of North Korea in popular culture.

LTEA 142 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTEN 022 - INTRO-LIT-BRTISH IS:1660-1832
Instructor: Sarah Nicolazzo

Are poets the "unacknowledged legislators of the world," as Percy Shelley wrote in 1820? Can literature build or topple empires? Is literature a business like any other, or does it transcend the logic of the market? Can anyone write literature, or is literary fame only accessible to those with the right family, gender, race, education, innate genius, emotional experience, or marketing savvy? Should literature represent entire nations, or reveal one individual's inner world?

These were pressing questions for British authors and readers between 1660 and 1832, a time period that included massive expansion in both literacy and the print industry, the birth of new genres like the newspaper and the novel, the Industrial Revolution, and Britain's transformation into the world's major imperial power. This class will offer an introduction to British literature of this tumultuous period, with particular focus on how authors defined the value of literature in a changing world. At the same time, we will practice the fundamental skills of literary analysis, learn the vocabulary of literary form, and learn how (and why) to read and write like a literary scholar. Throughout, we will return to the very questions that preoccupy the authors of our texts: what is literature, what does it do, and why does it matter? Authors include John Dryden, Katherine Philips, Alexander Pope, Phillis Wheatley, William Wordsworth, Charlotte Smith, and Mary Shelley.


LTEN 026 - INTRO/LIT OF U.S.1865-PRES 
Instructor: Meg Wesling

This course traces the development of national consciousness across 150 years, considering how literary texts, from late nineteenth-century populism to early twenty-first century popular culture, have constructed competing and often contradictory understandings of U.S. culture.


LTEN 027 - INTRO/AFRICAN-AMER LITERATURE 
Instructor: Dennis Childs

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTEN 107 - CHAUCER (a
The Canterbury Tales 
Instructor: Lisa Lampert-Weissig

In this course we will read a large portion of Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales. The course will attempt to situate Chaucer’s work within historical, cultural and literary contexts, with special attention paid to issues of gender and sexuality and how they inflect Chaucer’s poetics and politics. All readings will be in the original Middle English and students will be required to learn how to read Middle English aloud. Please bring required text, Jill Mann’s Penguin edition of The Canterbury Tales (ISBN: 978-0140422344), to the first class as we will begin with an intensive focus on Chaucer’s language.


LTEN 113 - SHAKESPEARE II:JACOBEAN PERIOD (a) 
Instructor: Daniel Vitkus

Students will read a representative selection of plays by Shakespeare from the latter half of the playwright's career. We will explore issues of concern for Shakespeare's audiences and for our own time--love, war, race, sex, mortality, good and evil. We will pay close attention to Shakespeare’s masterful way with words and images, with plots and characters, but at the same time we will connect our close readings of Shakespeare’s dazzling language to broader interpretive investigations of these texts and their patterns of meaning.  During the first few class meetings, students will learn about the historical and theatrical contexts in which Shakespeare lived and for which he wrote.  During the rest of the course, we will read, discuss and analyze six plays in a variety of dramatic genre (comedy, tragedy, history).  As much as possible, the class will view and discuss film versions of the plays and perform dramatic readings of selected scenes in order to understand these texts as scripts for live performance.


LTEN 127 - VICTORIAN POETRY (b) 
Instructor: Michael Lundell

The era of Queen Victoria (1837–1901) is marked by a period of relative economic and political stability in Britain, the expansion and breadth of the overseas English Empire and a stabilization and reaffirmation of English culture both at home and abroad. The poetry of this time period, however, reflects undercurrents of experimentalism, critiques of religion, questions about imperialism and colonialism, the maturation and spread of feminist thought and women’s rights, satire and comedy, a new and more intense focus on issues pertaining to poverty and class disparity, the aftermath/ongoing growth of the industrial revolution, the intensity of the development of urban spaces and the exploration of the boundaries of poetic form and vernacularism.

This course will provide an overview of canonical and non-canonical authors of the time period through the lens of several important subthemes including Empire, gender, religion, socioeconomic class, race, comedy and the poetic form. Rather than taking a linear/historical approach we will explore the variety of Victorian verse through these significant themes. Authors will include Christina Rossetti, Matthew Arnold, Alfred Tennyson, William Wordsworth, Rudyard Kipling, Thomas Hardy, the Brontë sisters, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Lewis Carroll and Oscar Wilde.

Students will be asked to write four short reading response papers (2-3 pages each). The final project and the main focus of the class will be on literary research, however. Each student will be assigned a poem to research and become an expert on. The final project will include an annotated bibliography, a historical background of the poem and its author and minor inquiries into, and a summary of, existing academic writing about the poem. 


LTEN 149 - THEMES/ENGLISH&AMERICAN LIT (d
Modern American Travel Literature 
Instructor: Daniel Vitkus

This course will enable armchair travelers to escape San Diego for the mountains of Tibet, the islands and ancient temples of Greece, a coast-to-coast American road trip, the deserts of Arabia, and more.  We will start with a brief look at some of the fundamental forms of the journey narrative (odyssey, exodus, quest, pilgrimage, discovery narrative).  This will enable students to consider the meaning of travel (and the genre of travel writing) as it evolved from the ancient to the postmodern period.  The rest of the course will focus on discussion and analysis of Modern American travel narratives by Henry Miller, Jack Kerouac, Joan Didion, and others.  


LTEN 155 - INTERACTION/AMER LIT&VIS ARTS (d) 
Race as Spectacle 
Instructor: Fatima El-Tayeb

In this course, we analyze the multiple ways in which race (as well as sexuality and gender) are both naturalized and deconstructed through visual media by focusing on one particular aspect: race as spectacle - the multiple ways in which race is produced as a visual mass culture commodity. This happens in politics, music videos, local news reports, fashion, kids animation, mug shots and countless other sites. We explore the modes of production of these images as well as the conditions of their reception, and political and philosophical analyses of this process – particularly those relating to questions of gender, class, sexuality and nation. Finally, we explore counterstrategies, which rather than rejecting mass culture, attempt to use it to undermine dominant images.


LTEN 169 - TOPICS IN LATINO/A LIT 
On gender, sexuality and class 
Instructor: Rosaura Sánchez

The course will focus on the representation of gender/sexuality and class in Chicana/Latina literature by examining a variety of writings on these issues and studying  two novels, one by Helena Maria Viramontes and one by Loida M. Perez,  a play by Josefina Lopez and several films.


LTEN 172 - AMER POETRY II:WHITMAN-MODERN (d) 
Instructor: Michael Davidson

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTEN 178 - COMPARATIVE ETHNIC LITERATURE 
Literary Responses to Trauma 
(Crosslisted with ETHN 168) 
Instructor: Lisa Lampert-Weissig

In her acceptance speech for the Nobel Prize in Literature, Toni Morrison said “Language can never 'pin down' slavery, genocide, war. Nor should it yearn for the arrogance to be able to do so. Its force, its felicity, is in its reach toward the ineffable.” Despite the impossibility of “pinning down” slavery, genocide and war through language, writers have, nevertheless tried to convey the impact of atrocity, of collective trauma on groups and on individuals. In this course students will read literary responses to war, genocide and slavery by individuals from several ethnic groups in the U.S.: African-Americans, Jewish-Americans, Vietnamese-Americans and Native Americans. I have chosen the U.S. works below because they are each explorations of responses to collective trauma as it impacts the individual and family across generations. These works represent experiences of those who are native to the U.S., those who immigrated here either willingly or as refugees and those who were brought here forcibly. Each work engages with the experience of the ethnic group within the larger frame of the “American experience.” Another striking thing that the works covered in the course all share is their engagement with some form of the otherworldly, either through representation of the supernatural, the use of “magic realism” or, in the case of Octavia Butler’s science fiction novel about slavery, Kindred, exploration of time travel. A focus on the fantastic, magic realism and experimental form will unite our readings and explorations. We will specifically consider the ways in which the authors we examine use literary form and the fantastic to attempt to convey extreme experiences both in the past and in the present day and how these literary choices affect the reader. Some of the readings planned are: Isaac Bashevis Singer, Enemies, a Love Story (1972), Octavia Butler, Kindred (1979); Louise Erdrich, Love Medicine (1988); Toni Morrison, Beloved (1987); Art Spiegelman, Maus I and II (1991); Jonathan Safran Foer, Everything is Illuminated (2002); lê thi diem thúy, The Gangster We are All Looking For (2003); secondary readings on magical realism, collective memory and the fantastic.


The following courses(s) are also considered LTEN equivalent:

LTCS 150 - TOPICS IN CULTURAL STUDIES
LTWL 120 - POPULAR LITERATURE AND CULTURE
LTWL 128 - INTRO/SEMIOTICS & APPLICATIONS
LTWL 184 - FILM STUDIES&LIT:ANALYSIS/TXT


LTEU 140 - ITALIAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLTN
Jewish-Italian Writers
Instructor: Adriana De Marchi Gherini

This course will analyze the themes of identity and belonging in the works of Jewish Italian writers in the 20th Century through the prose of Giorgio Bassani, Natalia Ginzburg, Italo Svevo, Primo Levi, Carlo Levi, Moni Ovadia's theater, and Umberto Saba's poetry. We will also spend a week learning about Jewish Italian food and its influence on "mainstream" Italian cuisine, and we will end by reading and discussing contemporary Jewish Italian writers like Gad Lerner and Fiamma Nirenstein. 


LTFR 002A - INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I 
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

First course in the intermediate sequence designed to be taken after LIFR1C/CX (If you choose to take LIFR1D/DX, you will still need to take LTFR 2A to continue in the French program). Short stories, cartoons and movies from various French-speaking countries are studied to strengthen oral and written language skills while developing reading competency and cultural literacy. A thorough review of grammar is included. Taught entirely in French. May be applied towards a minor in French literature. Successful completion of LTFR 2A satisfies the language requirement in Revelle and in Eleanor Roosevelt colleges.


LTFR 002B - INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II 
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

Plays from the 19th and 20th centuries as well as movies are studied to strengthen the skills developed in LTFR 2A. Includes a grammar review. Taught entirely in French. May be applied towards a minor in French literature or towards fulfilling the secondary literature requirement.


LTFR 021 - CONVERSATION WORKSHOP I 
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

One-unit course designed to develop oral skills. Discusses current cultural issues in the francophone world. May be taken twice for credit, alone or in combination with any literature course.


LTFR 031 - CONVERSATION WORKSHOP II 
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

One-unit course designed to develop oral skills. Current cultural issues in the francophone world are discussed. May be taken twice for credit, alone or in combination with any literature course.


LTFR 050 - INTERMED. FRENCH II/TEXT ANALY 
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

Emphasizes the development of language skills and the practice of textual analysis. Discussions are based on the analysis of various poetic texts (poems, short story, and songs) and on a film. Taught entirely in French. May be applied towards a minor in French literature or towards fulfilling the secondary literature requirement. Students who have completed 50 can register in upper-level courses (115 or 116).


LTFR 116 - THEMES/INTELLECT&LITERARY HIST 
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

une introduction à la littérature de langue française du 19e au 21e siècle à partir de textes représentatifs situés dans leur contexte historique. Le cours est entièrement en français.


LTFR 142 - GENRES OF FRENCH LITERATURE
Poesie et contes
 
Instructor: Winifred Woodhull

This course has been cancelled.


LTGM 002B - INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II 
Instructor: Jeannette Mohr

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTGK 002 - INTERMEDIATE GREEK I 
Instructor: Leslie Edwards

In the second quarter of first-year Attic Greek, we’ll continue to work through Shelmerdine’s Introduction to Greek.  Passages of Greek will be longer, more complicated, but also more rewarding. There will be quizzes, a midterm, and a final. Prerequisite: Greek 1 or the equivalent.


LTGK 130 - TRAGEDY 
Euripides’ Trojan Women 
Instructor: Jacobo Myerston

In this class we will read Euripides’ Trojan Women, a text that examines the effects of war on human society. In this tragedy Euripides tells the story of the women of Troy who were sold as slaves after their city had been plundered.  Although placed in the quasi-mythical past of the Homeric Bronze Age, Euripides adapted the narrative to explore, from the perspective of the victims, the contradictions of the nascent Athenian imperialism of the 5th century BCE.  Euripides’ clear language and diction is perfect to learn the mastering of Attic Greek in its poetical form.  Along the reading of the text, we will discuss matters of the author’s personal religiosity, his affinity to the philosophy of the time, and the political context of the play.


LTIT 002B - INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II 
Instructor: Adriana De Marchi Gherini

Please contact instructor for course description.


For more information about the UCSD Korean Language Program please visithttp://ucsdkoreanlanguage.blogspot.com/


LTKO 001A - BEGINNING KOREAN:FIRST YR. I 
Instructor: Jeyseon Lee

First year Korean 1A (5 units) is the first part of the Beginning Korean series. This course is designed to assist students to develop low-beginning level skills in the Korean language. These skills are speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as cultural understanding. This course will begin by introducing the writing and sound system of the Korean language. The remainder of the course will focus on grammatical patterns such as basic sentence structures, some grammatical points, and expressions. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following in Korean:

Speaking: Students are able to handle successfully a limited number of uncomplicated communicative tasks by creating with the language in straightforward social situation. Conversation is restricted to some of the concrete exchanges and predictable topics necessary for survival in the target-language culture. They can express personal meaning by combining and recombining what they know and what they hear from their interlocutors into short statements and discrete sentences.

Listening: Students are able to understand some information from sentence-length speech, one utterance at a time, in basic personal and social contexts, though comprehension is often uneven.

Reading: Students are able to understand some information from the simplest connected texts dealing with a limited number of personal and social needs, although there may be frequent misunderstandings.

Writing: Students are able to meet some limited practical writing needs. They can create statements and formulate questions based on familiar material. Most sentences are re-combinations of learned vocabulary and structure.


LTKO 001B - BEGINNING KOREAN:FIRST YR. II 
Instructor: Jeyseon Lee

First Year Korean 1B (5 units) is the second part of the Beginning Korean series. This course is designed to assist students to develop mid-beginning level skills in the Korean language. These skills are speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as cultural understanding. LTKO 1B is designed for students who have already mastered the materials covered in LTKO 1A or who are already in the equivalent proficiency level. This course will focus on grammatical patterns, such as sentence structures, some simple grammatical points, and some survival level use of the Korean language. Additionally, speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension will all be emphasized, with special attention to oral speech. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following in Korean:

Speaking: Students are able to handle successfully a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks in straightforward social situations. Conversation is generally limited to those predictable and concrete exchange necessary for survival in the target culture. They are capable of asking a variety of questions when necessary to obtain simple information to satisfy basic needs.

Listening: Students are able to understand simple, sentence-length speech, one utterance at a time, in variety of basic personal and social contexts. Comprehension is most often accurate with highly familiar and predictable topics although a few misunderstandings may occur.

Reading: Students are able to understand short, non-complex texts that convey basic information and deal with basic personal and social topics to which they bring personal interest or knowledge, although some misunderstandings may occur. They may get some meaning from short connected texts featuring description and narration, dealing with familiar topics.

Writing: Students are able to meet a number of practical writing needs. They can write short, simple communications, compositions, and requests for information in loosely connected texts about personal preferences, daily routines, common events, and other personal topics.


LTKO 001C - BEGINNING KOREAN:FIRST YR. III 
Instructor: Jeyseon Lee

First Year Korean 1C (5 units) is the third part of the Beginning Korean. This course is designed to assist students to develop high-beginning level skills in the Korean language. These skills are speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as cultural understanding. LTKO 1C is designed for students who have already mastered LTKO 1B or who are already in the equivalent proficiency level. This course will focus on grammatical patterns such as sentence structures, some simple grammatical points, and some survival level use of Korean language. Additionally, speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension will all be emphasized, with special attention to oral speech. Upon completion of this course, students will become able to do the following in Korean:

Speaking: Students are able to converse with ease and confidence when dealing with the routine tasks and social situations. They are able to handle successfully uncomplicated tasks and social situations requiring an exchange of basic information. They can narrate and describe in all major time frames using connected discourse of paragraph length, but not all the time.

Listening: Students are able to understand, with ease and confidence, simple sentence-length speech in basic personal and social contexts. They can derive substantial meaning from some connected texts, although there often will be gaps in understanding due to a limited knowledge of the vocabulary and structure of the spoken language.

Reading: Students are able to understand fully and with ease short, non-complex texts that convey basic information and deal with personal and social topics to which they brings personal interest or knowledge. They are able to understand some connected texts featuring description and narration although there will be occasional gaps in understanding due to a limited knowledge of the vocabulary, structures, and writing conventions of the language.

Writing: Students are able to meet all practical writing needs of the basic level. They also can write compositions and simple summaries related to work and/or school experiences. They can narrate and describe in different time frames when writing about everyday events and situations.


LTKO 002A - INTERMEDIATE KOREAN:2ND YR I 
Instructor: Jeyseon Lee

Second Year Korean 2A is the first part of the Intermediate Korean. Students in this course are assumed to have previous knowledge of Korean, which was taught in the Korean 1A, 1B, and 1C courses. Students in this course will learn low-intermediate level skills in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Korean, as well as expand their cultural understanding. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to acquire and use more vocabularies, expressions and sentence structures and to have a good command of Korean in various conversational situations. Students are expected to write short essays using the vocabularies, expressions, and sentence structures introduced. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following in Korean:

Speaking: Students are able to handle a variety of communicative tasks. They are able to participate in most informal and some formal conversations on topics related to school, home, and leisure activities. Students demonstrate the ability to narrate and describe in the major time frames in paragraph-length discourse. They show the ability  to combine and link sentences into connected discourse of paragraph length.

Listening: Students are able to understand short conventional narrative and descriptive texts with a clear underlying structure though their comprehension may uneven. They understand the main facts and some supporting details. Comprehension may often derive primarily from situation and subject-matter knowledge.

Reading: Students are able to understand conventional narrative and descriptive texts with a clear underlying structure though their comprehension may be uneven. These texts predominantly contain high-frequency vocabulary and structure. Students understand the main ideas and some supporting details. Comprehension may often derive primarily from situational and subject-matter knowledge.

Writing: Students are able to meet basic work and/or academic writing needs. They are able to compose simple summaries on familiar topics. They are able to combine and link sentences into texts of paragraph length and structure. They demonstrate the ability to incorporate a limited number of cohesive devices.


LTKO 002B - INTERMEDIATE KOREAN:SECOND YR 
Instructor: Jeyseon Lee

Second Year Korean 2B (5 units) is the second part of the Intermediate Korean. Students in this course are assumed to have previous knowledge of Korean, which was taught during the Korean 1A, 1B, 1C, and 2A courses. Students in this course will learn mid-intermediate level of standard modern Korean in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as expand their cultural understanding. After the completion of this course, students are expected to acquire and use more vocabularies, expressions, and sentence structures and to have a good command of Korean in various conversational situations. Students are also expected to write short essays using the vocabularies, expressions, and sentence structures introduced. Upon completion of this course, students will become able to do the following in Korean:

Speaking: Students are able to handle with ease and confidence a large number of communicative tasks. They participate actively in most informal and some formal exchanges on a variety of concrete topics relating to work, school, home, and leisure activities, as well as topics relating to events of current, public, and personal interest or individual relevance.

Listening: Students are able to understand conventional narrative and descriptive texts, such as extended descriptions of persons, places, and things, and narrations about past, present, and future events. The speech is predominantly in familiar target-language patterns. They understand the main facts and many supporting details.

Reading: Students are able to understand conventional narrative and descriptive texts, such as extended descriptions of persons, places, and things an narrations about past, present, and future events. They understand the main ideas, facts and many supporting details. Students my derive some meaning from texts that are structurally and/or conceptually more complex.

Writing: Students are able to meet a range of work and/or academic writing needs. They are able to write straightforward summaries on topics of general interest. There is good control of the most frequently used target-language syntactic structure and a range of general vocabulary.


LTKO 003 - ADVANCED KOREAN/THIRD YEAR 
Instructor: Jeyseon Lee

Third Year Korean 3B (5 units) is the second part of the advanced Korean. Students in this course are assumed to have previous knowledge of Korean, which was taught in the Korean 2A, 2B, 2C and 3A courses. Students in this course will learn mid-advanced level skills in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Korean, as well as expand their cultural understanding. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to acquire and use more vocabularies, expressions and sentence structures and to have a good command of Korean in formal situations. Students are expected to read and understand daily newspapers and daily news broadcasts. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following in Korean:

Speaking: Students are able to communicate with accuracy and fluency in order to participate fully and effectively in conversations on a variety of topics in formal and informal settings from both concrete and abstract perspectives. They discuss their interests and special fields of competence, explain complex matters in detail, and provide lengthy and coherent narrations, all with ease, fluency, and accuracy. They present their opinions on a number of issues of interest to them, and provide structured arguments to support these opinions.

Listening: Students are able to understand speech in a standard dialect on a wide range of familiar and less familiar topics. They can follow linguistically complex extended discourse. Comprehension is no longer limited to the listener's familiarity with subject matter, but also comes from a command of the language that is supported by a broad vocabulary, an understanding of more complex structures and linguistic experience within the target culture. Students can understand not only what is said, but sometimes what is left unsaid.

Reading: Students are able to understand texts from many genres dealing with a wide range of subjects, both familiar and unfamiliar. Comprehension is no longer limited to the reader's familiarity with subject matter, but also comes from a command of the language that is supported by a broad vocabulary, an understanding of complex structures and knowledge of the target culture. Students at this level can draw inferences from textual and extralinguistic clues.

Writing: Students are able to produce most kinds of formal and informal correspondence, in-depth summaries, reports, and research papers. They demonstrate the ability to explain complex matters, and to present and support opinions by developing cogent arguments and hypotheses. They demonstrate a high degree of control of grammar and syntax, of general vocabulary, of spelling or symbol production, of cohesive devices, and of punctuation.


LTLA 002 - INTERMEDIATE LATIN I 
Instructor: Eliot Wirshbo

More of the same, except piled higher and deeper. That is, you still have to memorize -- though the memorization does get easier/less overwhelming -- and try to piece together thorny sentences, but the details of grammar continue to unfold in a way that is either daunting or challenging, depending on your constitution. Syntactic niceties whose labels hint at Dantesque involutions (the double dative? an accusative of exclamation? a genitive of value? an ablative of cause? correlative pairs?) can only hint at the stations along the mid-point of your grammatical journey into ... an even more hopeless limbo or the promise of true enlightenment?

LTLA 002 - INTERMEDIATE LATIN I 
Instructor: Leslie Edwards

In the second quarter of first-year Latin, we’ll continue working through McKeown’s Classical Latin textbook. There will be weekly quizzes, two mini-midterms, and a final.


LTLA 133 - EPIC 
Horace’s “Ars Poetica” 
Instructor: Anthony Edwards

Just to explain, “LTLA 133: Epic” was as close as I could get to this text with the existing course numbers. Horace’s “Ars Poetica,” or perhaps more properly his “Letter to the Pisos” (Epistula ad Pisones), is not epic but at least it’s in hexameters. The poem is an invaluable window onto what the Romans themselves thought about what made a literary work good, just as interesting for the questions it does answer as for those it fails to ask. I expect we will be able to read the entire poem without much trouble. We should also have time to look into the sources, Greek and Latin, that influenced Horace, to consider how questions of literary form and consumption fit into Greco-Roman culture, and to test how well Horace’s poem illuminates our reading of Latin literature. I should also add that I think you’ll enjoy reading Horace’s poetry. Midterm, final, and paper.


LTRU 001B - FIRST-YEAR RUSSIAN 
Instructor: Rebecca Wells

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTRU 002B - SECOND-YEAR RUSSIAN 
Instructor: Rebecca Wells

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTRU 104B - ADVANCED PRACTICUM IN RUSSIAN 
Instructor: Rebecca Wells

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTRU 123 - SINGLE AUTHOR IN RUSSIAN LIT 
Dostoevsky 
(Crosslisted with LTEU 158) 
Instructor: Steven Cassedy

In this course we will read three novels by the great nineteenth-century Russian writer Fedor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky: The Idiot, The Devils, and The Brothers Karamazov. We will discuss the novels in their historical, social, cultural, and religious context.


LTSP 002A - READINGS AND COMPOSITION 
Instructor: TAs supervised by Beatrice Pita

This 5 unit intermediate course meets 4 days per week and is taught entirely in Spanish.  LTSP 2A emphasizes the development of communicative skills, reading ability, listening comprehension and writing skills. It includes grammar review, short readings, class discussions and working with Spanish-language video and Internet materials. This course is designed to prepare students for LTSP 2B and 2C. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisites: Completion of LISP 1C/CX, its equivalent, or a score of 3 on the AP Spanish language exam.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2A is scheduled for SATURDAY, MARCH 12th, 2016.

Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 002B - READINGS & INTERPRETATIONS 
Instructor: TAs supervised by Beatrice Pita

This intermediate course is designed for students who wish to improve their grammatical competence, ability to speak, read and write Spanish. It is a continuation of LTSP 2A with special emphasis on problems in writing and interpretation. Students meet with the instructor 4 days per week. Work for this 5 unit course includes oral presentations, grammar review, writing assignments, class discussions on the readings and work with Spanish-language video and Internet materials. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisites: Completion of LTSP 2A, its equivalent, or a score of 4 on the AP Spanish language exam.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2B is scheduled for SATURDAY, MARCH 12th, 2016.

Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 002C - CULTURAL READINGS&COMPOSITION 
Instructor: TAs supervised by Beatrice Pita

The goal of this intermediate language course is twofold: to further develop all skill areas in Spanish and to increase Spanish language-based cultural literacy. LTSP 2C is a continuation of the LTSP second-year sequence with special emphasis on problems in grammar, writing and translation. It includes class discussions of cultural topics as well as grammar review and composition assignments. The course will further develop the ability to read articles, essays and longer pieces of fictional and non-fictional texts as well as the understanding of Spanish-language materials on the Internet. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisite: Completion of LTSP 2B, its equivalent, or a score of 5 on the AP Spanish language exam. This course satisfies the third course requirement of the collegerequired language sequence as well as the language requirement for participation in UCEAP.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2C is scheduled for SATURDAY, MARCH 12th, 2016.

Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 002D - INTER/ADV SPANISH 
Spanish for heritage speakers I
Instructor: TAs supervised by Beatrice Pita

Designed for bilingual students who have been exposed to Spanish at home but have little or no formal training in Spanish. The goal is for students who are comfortable understanding, reading and speaking in Spanish to further develop existing skills and to acquire greater oral fluency, and grammatical control through grammar review, and reading and writing practice. Building on existing strengths, the course will allow students to develop a variety of Spanish language strategies to express themselves in Spanish with greater ease and precision. Prepares native-speakers for more advanced courses. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisite: Native speaking ability and/or recommendation of instructor.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2D is scheduled for SATURDAY, MARCH 12th, 2016.

Enrollment for LTSP 2D requires department pre-authorization; contact instructor

(bpita@ucsd.edu) with any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 002E - ADVNCD READINGS/COMPOSITION 
Spanish for heritage speakers II
Instructor: TAs supervised by Beatrice Pita

An advanced/intermediate course designed for bilingual students who may or may not have studied Spanish formally, but possess good oral skills and seek to become fully bilingual and biliterate. Reading and writing skills stressed with special emphasis on improvement of written expression, vocabulary development and problems of grammar and orthography. Prepares native-speakers with a higher level of oral proficiency for more advanced courses. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisite: Native speaking ability and/or recommendation of instructor.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2E is scheduled for SATURDAY, MARCH 12th, 2016.

Enrollment for LTSP 2E requires department pre-authorization; contact instructor

(bpita@ucsd.edu) with any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 031 - CONVERSATION WORKSHOP II 
Instructor: TAs supervised by Beatrice Pita

NEW FOR Winter 2015: Note that section A00 of the LTSP31 Conversation Workshops will have a special focus on health & medical vocabulary development and health services conversational contexts. Contact bpita@ucsd.edu for further information. Designed to allow students with a basic grounding in Spanish to discuss a variety of topics related to literary and current cultural issues. Focus will be on vocabulary development, use of idiomatic expressions and advancing oral proficiency in Spanish. Pre-requisites: LISP 1C/CX or consent of the instructor. Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with any questions regarding placement.

Note: This conversation/discussion class meets once a week. May be taken as an adjunct to lower division Lt/Sp courses, alone, or in combination with any other LTSP course.

Recommended for students planning to study abroad. May be taken 3 times for credit as topics vary. May be taken P/NP or for a letter grade. No Final Exam.

Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 050B - READINGS/LATIN AMER LITERATURE 
Instructor: TAs supervised by Beatrice Pita

This course introduces students to cultural analysis through the close textual reading of a selection of Latin American texts including novels, plays, short fiction and poetry. Coursework includes reading of texts, participation in class discussions and written assignments. LTSP 50B prepares Literature majors and minors for upper-division work. Two classes from the LTSP 50ABC series (any two) are required for Spanish Literature majors. May be applied towards a minor in Spanish Literature or towards fulfilling the second literature requirement for Literature majors. Prerequisites: Completion of LTSP 2C, 2D, 2E or 2 years of college level Spanish.

Notes: The Final Exam for LTSP 50B is scheduled for SATURDAY, MARCH 12th, 2016.

Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 135B - MODERN MEXICAN LITERATURE
Modern Mexico in Film & Fiction
 
Instructor: Max Parra

This courses surveys key Mexican literary works and films from the early 20th century to the 1960s. We will locate the readings in the context of Mexico’s transition from a rural to an urban society and the strengths and weaknesses of cultural nationalism during this period. The films we be drawn from the so-called Golden Age of Mexican Cinema.

Readings by Azuela, María Luisa Ocampo, Rosario Castellanos, and José Agustín. Films by Emilio Fernández, Matilde Landeta, Alejandro Galindo, and Luis Buñuel.

LTSP 135B will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTSP 142 - LATIN AMERICAN SHORT STORY 
El cuento latinoamericano
Instructor: Milos Kokotovic

En este curso vamos a leer una selección de cuentos latinoamericanos de los siglos XX y XXI de varios países (Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, México, Nicaragua, Perú, Puerto Rico).  Analizaremos cómo se ha usado el género del cuento para representar temas sociales como la modernización, el autoritarismo, el imperialismo, la revolución y el papel de grupos tradicionalmente subordinados (e.g. las mujeres, los pueblos indígenas) en estos procesos.  

LTSP 142 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTSP 171 - STUDIES/LITERATURE AND SOCIETY 
Literature, Dictatorship, and Revolution
Instructor: Milos Kokotovic

In this course we will read literary works from two regions that underwent major social and political transformations in the 1970s and 1980s: the Southern Cone countries (Chile and Argentina) and Central America (Nicaragua and El Salvador).  The social and political upheavals of these years—marked by brutal military coups and dictatorships as well as unarmed and armed struggles against authoritarian governments—gave rise to new forms of writing.  We will pay particular attention to the innovations in narrative and poetic form used to represent social realities during these periods of rapid change and traumatic conflict, for which existing literary forms in many cases turned out to be inadequate.

LTSP 171 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTSP 174 - TOPICS IN CULTURE & POLITICS
Social Movements and Culture in Mexico: From 1968 to Ayotzinapa
 
Instructor: Max Parra

This course is a survey of social movements in Mexico beginning with the 1968 student movement, its antecedents, development, brutal repression, and the lasting impact it had in Mexican politics and culture. We will continue with the 1994 Zapatistas movement, the struggle for indigenous rights and alternative forms of politics and economic coexistence.

The Mexican state’s neoliberal policies have left the citizenry unprotected from the brutal mechanisms of capital and, increasingly, has relinquished its ethical responsibility to guarantee the security of the population. These policies will frame the discussion of current struggles for territorial, social, and economic justice with a focus on the social activism and mobilizations triggered by the –still unresolved-- massacre of 43 Ayotzinapa students in 2014.

LTSP 174 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTWL 019B - INTRO/ANCIENT GREEKS & ROMANS
Classical Athens
Instructor: Eliot Wirshbo

This course alternates between presenting the ancient Greeks as utterly alien and as surprisingly contemporary in their concerns and imaginings. The approach is literary insofar as we'll read texts as interpretable entities amenable to discussion of both authorial design and unique contemporary gestation; anthropological in that the often alien orientation of our texts needs to be placed within the cultural assumptions informing them (for example, "pollution" meant something inner and moral in fifth-century Greece rather than external and physical); philological in that sometimes individual words can provide starting-points for beginning to comprehend complex idea-clusters. (Just imagine how useful for future students of our own time it will be to focus on terms like Tea-party or American Dream or Social Media.) Despite its absence from the course's title, the old-fashioned term 'civilization' is appropriate to signal how much the material to be studied  crosses disciplinary boundary lines and how varied the approaches to that material need to be.
 
The Greeks have been rightly admired for starting a great "conversation" whose strands continue to occupy the interest of us all: how do we govern our society and control ourselves? how do the sexes mesh, what should their relationship be, where do we stand on homosexuality? what is the connection between words and thoughts and why did my paper get a C when my thoughts are so noble? is there an inner life of the 'soul' and, if so, how important is it? are we to view the past as a vital pattern predictive of our own unfolding lives or as an entertaining pastiche of exotica?
 
To get back down to earth, there will be two papers totaling the prescribed 2,500 words of writing for a lower-division Literature course, a mid-term, and a final based on the readings and what is said in the lectures. No podcasts, Clickrs, laptops, tablets ... only reed pens and papyrus scrolls to write with/on.

LTWL 100 - MYTHOLOGY 
Myths of the Greeks and Romans
Instructor: Page duBois

Gods, goddesses, heroes and queens, Amazons and monsters---the fabulous creatures of the classical world, many once divine, persist as myth into our present. The course will explore the pleasures of stories told of these characters from ancient Greece and Rome, in poetry and tragedy, and their survival into the Renaissance and the present. Readings include Homer's Odyssey, the Theogony, The Homeric Hymns, two Athenian tragedies, Alcestis and the Bacchae, Ovid's Metamorphoses, Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream, and a contemporary novel, Gods Behaving Badly.


LTWL 120 - POPULAR LITERATURE AND CULTURE 
Tolkien and Middle Earth
Instructor: Stephen Potts

J. R. R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings inspired an international cult in the 1960s and 70s and a popular movie trilogy in this century. It also spawned an entire popular genre as well as a considerable body of sophisticated literary criticism. We will consider the materials—historical, biographical, mythical, literary, and linguistic—that went into the creation of the twentieth century’s best-known fantasy epic before launching on our own quest through the text. In the process we will read the works that frame Lord of the Rings: Tolkien’s children’s book The Hobbit and the “Bible” of Middle Earth eventually published as The Silmarillion, along with related tales not published in Tolkien’s lifetime. Previous knowledge of Elvish not required.

LTWL 120 is a LTEN equivalent course


LTWL 128 - INTRO/SEMIOTICS & APPLICATIONS 
Dreams in Cinema
Instructor: Alain Cohen

How do we compare our own analysis of our everyday dreams with the dreams represented in film? Our readings in film interpretation will run the gamut from Freud’s basic Interpretation of Dreams, to today’s psychoanalytic theories and research done in neuroscience so as to elaborate upon this question. Films proposed for extended study will include such classics as Alfred Hitchcock’s renowned Spellbound (1945) and Ingmar Bergman’s Wild Strawberries (1957). Other films which explore dreams and dream-like fantasies will extend to Stanley Kubrick’s Eyes Wide Shut (1999), Chris Nolan’s complex dream-within-dreams in Inception (2010), Michael Haneke’s The Piano Teacher (2001) –whose main protagonist does not dream as her life experience is that of a lived nightmare –, as well as clips from several other contemporary films. These clips will illustrate the relationship of psychoanalysis and cinema which is at the heart of film theory and film history, as are several approaches to the semiotics of cinema. The films with explicit dreams, fantasies, and reveries will be studied with focus on the viewer/character and psychoanalyst/patient interactions, towards the interpretation of symptoms, anxiety, conflict, repression, et al.

The course will be run in seminar style around the main topics of dreams, dream interpretation, the flashback as art and convention, audiences’ involvement, patients and psychoanalysts in cinema, with rf. to the foundational texts of film theory (by C. Metz, L. Mulvey, G. & K. Gabbard). Lectures will also deal with methods of psychoanalytic theory applied to dreams in film – which involve psychoanalysts and semioticians from early Freud to contemporary research in neuroscience.

For their paper on close analysis and for their course project, students will consult with their professor to choose a specific film involving dreams, in conjunction with at least one of the authors selected from the reading list and from the course Reader (made available by week 3 through University Readers.) Several films will be suggested for such, during the first half of the course – e.g., Michel Gondry’s Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004), or his amusing The Science of Sleep (2006), among so many films where dreams appear.

Course may be taken as a LTEN equivalent.

Graduate students are welcome.

LTWL 128 is a LTEN equivalent course


LTWL 157 - IRANIAN FILM 
Instructor: Babak Rahimi

in this course, we examine key Iranian films from its beginnings to contemporary history. We will study the socio-political and cultural changes, in particular after the 1979 revolution, watching films such as Qeysar, The Cow, The House is Black, The Traveler, Close-Up, Snow and others.

LTWL 157 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTWL 158C - TOPICS IN OTHER CHRISTIANITIES 
Bizarre & Blasphemous Texts
Instructor: Dayna Kalleres

This course has been cancelled.


LTWL 172 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE 
Travel literature
Instructor: Todd Kontje

Human beings have always traveled, whether to explore new worlds or escape old ones, to encounter new peoples or to discover themselves. In this course we will read six classic works of travel literature grouped into three broad themes. We will begin with Goethe’s Italian Journey and accounts of Flaubert in Egypt, focusing on ways in which the two very different artists used travel as a springboard to poetic rebirth. We will turn next to two works that straddle the boundary between science and the humanities, Alexander von Humboldt’s Personal Narrative of his journey to South America and Charles Darwin’s Voyage of the Beagle. We conclude with two recent works: Bruce Chatwin’s Songlines, a lyrical reflection on modern life in Australia’s outback, and Jon Krakauer’s Into Thin Air, a gripping account of tragedy on Mount Everest. We will also have the opportunity to view and discuss three films: Master and CommanderWalkabout, and The Conquest of Everest.


LTWL 176 - LITERATURE AND IDEAS 
Marx/Nietzsche/Freud
Instructor: William O'Brien

It is arguable that no three writers have so greatly influenced modern life and thought as Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud.  This course will introduce students to the major ideas of all three writers in some of their most famous works.  We shall also pay special attention to their literary styles, and to problematic and disturbing aspects of their work.

The readings are:

Marx: The Communist Manifesto and selections from the Manuscripts of 1844, The German Ideology, and Das Kapital.

Nietzsche: "On Truth and Lies in the Extra-Moral Sense," The Genealogy of Morality, and Thus Spoke Zarathustra.

Freud: An Outline of Psychoanalysis, Fragment of a Case of Hysteria (the "Dora" case), and selected essays.

Students will write a 5-page essay on each author.


LTWL 184 - FILM STUDIES&LIT:ANALYSIS/TXT 
Relationships in Cinema
Instructor: Alain Cohen

Films about “relationships” may be constructed as a quasi “genre” in the history of cinema. This course will vet the psychology and æsthetics of modern/postmodern “relationships.”

Couples meet, love, fight, part, meet again, in the everyday as well as during war and other traumatic circumstances. Filmmakers have found myriad ways of presenting these convoluted relationships, and have challenged us with their portrayals. Excerpts from classics or cult films will highlight these conflicted relationship entanglements. Clips will include excerpts from Mike Nichols's Closer (2004) on crisscrossing couples – played by C. Owens, J. Roberts, N. Portman and J. Law–, contrasted with his cult film Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), Woody Allen’s self-destructive characters in his classic Manhattan (1979) contrasted with his more recent and stylistic Celebrity (1998), or his morally tragi-comic Match Point (2005), David Lynch’s identity and gender identity crisis in Lost Highway (1997) and Mulholland Drive (2001), Stanley Kubrick’s study of the aggressive use of dreams and fantasies in Eyes Wide Shut (1999), Lisa Cholodenko's tortured women lovers in High Art (1998), Paul Schrader’s postmodern lovers lost in an uncanny Venice in The Comfort of Strangers (1990.)

Excerpts and a few other clips from more current films will also be included.

As usual, precise methods of film analysis – frame and shot composition, shot-by-shot analysis, narrative programs, filmic figures, film genre,  deep structure, integration of specific films into the history of cinema, and filmic poetics – will be emphasized during the first weeks of the term. Students will explore the case of the compelling effect of /Relationships/ films. “Veteran” students will be asked for work building upon their previous research.

Course may count for Lit-in-Eng credit.

LTWL 184 is a LTEN equivalent course


LTWL 191 - HONORS SEMINAR 
Why study/teach/write literature?
Instructor: Nicole Tonkovich

The honors seminar has two objectives: to help you conceive of and begin working on an honors thesis, and to engage you in lively discussions about a central topic or topics. Together over the quarter we will read and discuss Leslie Marmon’s Silko’s Almanac of the Dead.  We will also become familiar with and involved in current conversations about the importance of studies in the humanities (particularly in literary studies) to contemporary issues.


Read before signing up for LTWR courses: Enrollment in Literature Writing Courses


LTWR 008A - WRITING: FICTION 
Instructor: Cristina Rivera-Garza

Study of fiction in both theory and practice. Narrative technique studied in terms of subjectivity and atmosphere, description, dialogue, and the editing process will be introduced through readings from the history of the novel and short story. Writing exercises accompany reading assignments.

Close readings of short stories from a range of literary traditions, with special emphasis on contemporary science fiction from Mexico. All texts in English translation. Let these readings influence the short story you will be writing in this class.


LTWR 008B - WRITING POETRY 
Instructor: Pasquale Verdicchio

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWR 104A - THE NOVELLA I 
Instructor: Melvyn Freilicher

This two quarter sequence offers students the unique opportunity to focus intensively on writing a lengthy piece of fiction, to be accomplished in stages, beginning in winter and ending in spring quarter. During this period, students will read and critique several drafts of their peers’ work.  There will be quizzes and discussions on a number of novellas, including those by Nathanael West, Carson McCullers, Marguerite Duras, Tennessee Williams, Penelope Fitzgerald, Patrick Modiano, and others. NOTE: LTWR 104A is the first of a two part sequence, and students must commit to taking this course for both quarters this academic year.  At the conclusion of LTWR 104A, students will receive an “IP” (in progress) grade which will be resolved at the conclusion of LTWR 104B, to be offered in the spring.  Prerequisite:  LTWR 100.


LTWR 113 - INTERCULTURAL WRITING 
Instructor: John Gibler

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWR 114 - GRAPHIC TEXTS WKSHOP
Insurgent Journalism
 
Instructor: Charles Glaubitz

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWR 120 - PERSONAL NARRATIVE WKSHOP 
Memoir
Instructor: Camille Forbes

In this workshop course, students read and discuss works of various memoirists, delving into craft-based exercises meant help students access subject matter and hone writing skills. A single, well-crafted substantial memoir essay is the ultimate aim of the quarter's explorations.


LTWR 126 - CREATIVE NONFIC WKSHOP 
LITERATURE & SOCIAL TEXT
Instructor: Melvyn Freilicher

This course features texts which focus both on sociopolitical issues, and literary innovation (conceptual and stylistic). Readings fall within a range of genres, including feature writing, reportage, essays, memoirs, oral history. We’ll read James Baldwin’s THE EVIDENCE OF THINGS NOT SEEN; excerpts from Elias Canetti’s CROWDS AND POWER, James Agee’s LET US NOW PRAISE FAMOUS MEN, Susan Faludi’s STIFFED: The Betrayal of the American Male; essays by Susan Sontag,  Roland Barthes, Robert Darnton, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and others. The major writing project for the class can take many forms: the goal is to create an analytic portrait of a social scene or trend.  You might focus on a physical space (neighborhood; community organization; public space) or a subculture (as evidenced in what it produces and how it is/isn’t depicted in the media).  All projects will entail observation, research, interviews, and the writers clearly articulating their own viewpoints: your actual relations to the subject matter might range from intimate participant to remote observer of a scene.  We’ll discuss drafts of all student projects in the second half of the quarter, and you’ll provide written critiques for many of these.  Final, revised projects are due finals week.


LTWR 129 - DISTRIBUTING LITERATURE 
Instructor: Lorena Gomez-Mostajo

In this course students will explore the different ways in which books have been conceptualized, made, and distributed over the years. (ejemplos) We will analyze how books shape texts and influence readers, as well as the ways in which authors have abandoned or altered the page. Departing from Ulises Carrión's idea that “a book is a sequence of spaces,” students will devise and carry out a book project for a proposed text.


LTWR 143 - STYLISTICS AND GRAMMAR 
Instructor: John Granger

Please contact instructor for course description.