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Literature Undergraduate Course Descriptions Spring 2016


LTCS 052 - TOPICS IN CULTURAL STUDIES 
Instructor: Ping-hui Liao

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTCS 087 - FRESHMAN SEMINAR 
Television and American Identity
Instructor: Meg Wesling

This course examines aspects of how TV shapes our perceptions of the world we live in. We will focus on questions of race, gender, and sexuality in popular media and politics.


LTCS 087 - FRESHMAN SEMINAR 
Don't Believe Everything You Think
Instructor: Margaret Loose

How and why do our minds deceive us, and what can we do about it? This course includes fun and practical demonstrations of the illusions, biases, short-cuts, and fallacies that lead us to misjudge the quality of information, and suggests ways we can sharpen our thinking about everyday claims, urban legends, scams, charlatans, and our own senses.


LTCS 150 - TOPICS IN CULTURAL STUDIES 
Instructor: Ping-hui Liao

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTEA 110C - CONTEMP CHINESE FIC/TRANSLATN 
Queer Chinese Cultures 
Instructor: Ari Heinrich

This course offers a survey of materials on Chinese lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and gender-nonconforming literature, cinema, culture, and critical theory from contemporary China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and beyond.  All materials will be available in English (i.e. translations of fiction, film with subtitles, and academic writing in English), although Chinese-speaking students may choose to read/view in the original language.  This is a discussion- and reading-intensive course in which we will explore a diverse sampling of materials related to Chinese queer cultures.  Active student participation in discussion and presentations is essential.  The course is open to all students, but will be of particular interest to students with backgrounds in literature, cinema, Chinese studies, critical gender studies, and popular culture studies.


LTEA 110C will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTEN 023 - LIT/BRITISH ISLES:1832-PRESENT 
Instructor: Margaret Loose

Between 1832 and the present Britain has undergone radical changes socially, politically, sexually, economically, religiously, and . . . literarily.  Besides getting a sense of some major authors of this period, we will also try to grasp the ways in which literature has undergone transformations both to create and to keep up with those other categories of alteration.  One marked transition has been the appearance of more women, more (openly) gay/lesbian, more working-class, and more post-colonial writers, so we will sample writings by all of these.  Another important set of shifts has been in the modes and lengths of narrative and in the formal features and social significance of poetry; these too will occupy our attention, and we’ll spend some time getting an adequate vocabulary to talk about them.  Books will be available at the UCSD Bookstore, and course grades will be based on a mid-term exam, final exam, weekly quizzes, 5-6 page essay, and required attendance/participation in discussion sections.


LTEN 025 - INTRO/LIT OF U.S.BEGIN TO 1865 
American Literary History
Instructor: Sara Johnson

This course presents a survey of U.S. literature from the pre-colonial period to the years leading up to the Civil War.  We focus on the conflict and collaborations of several “national” cultures as warring British, French and Spanish settlers fought Native populations in what would become the northeast, mid-west and southern United States for control over the continent. From Puritan and Native American oratory, to captivity and travel narratives, to early poetry, novels and periodicals, we engage questions about the very nature of how “literature” and “American” were defined during the period. Texts are supplemented with early maps, popular musical forms such as the Broadway hit Hamilton, and visual images.  Authors studied include Mary Jemison, John Smith, Anne Bradstreet, Ben Franklin, Ann Hutchinson, William Apess, Cabeza de Vaca, Olaudah Equiano, Thomas Jefferson, Leonora Sansay, Susanna Rowson, Herman Melville, and Frederick Douglass.  Special attention is paid to the historical contexts of the revolutionary period, piracy, the rise of slavery, gender roles, and forced Native American removals in a hemispheric context. Attendance in section is mandatory.


LTEN 028 - INTR/ASIAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE
Instructor: John Blanco

This introductory class to works (literary and cultural) by Asian American writers, artists, and performers explores the fictions, narratives, tales, myths and legends that construct our idea(s) of Asia, Asians, Asian-Americans; and finally, America. Beyond a mere recounting of how Asians "over there" ended up "over here," or even how their descendants deal with their family's past and present, this course examines how literature and culture serve as techniques for promoting, dismantling, reorienting, or transgressing the networks of knowledge and power in US society through redefinitions and questionings of the self, the community, and the outside. What kind of knowledge does Asian American culture offer? At what point does analysis turn toward new forms of understanding, solidarity, advocacy, or resistance?  

This course contributes to the lower-division requirement for Literature majors in Cultural Studies (LTCS), English (LTEN), Literatures of the World (LTWL), and Writing (LTWR). For students majoring in fields outside Literature, consult with your advisor regarding whether this course may satisfy a requirement or elective in your field of study.


LTEN 110 - THE RENAISSANCE:THEMES&ISSUES (a) 
Instructor: Seth Lerer

During the English Renaissance, poetry had become as much a social and political practice as it had been an artistic pursuit. “English” verse was responding to European models, while at the same time transforming traditional forms and Classical sources. Courtly literature circulated in manuscript, while printed books made much of that literature available to a commercial, reading public. And many writers also speculated on what poetry and rhetoric was, thus generating the first sustained examples of “literary criticism” in English. All these developments help us see major poets of the period in new ways: Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Donne, and Jonson. This course seeks to understand what “poetry” meant socially, aesthetically, personally, economically, and politically from the early sixteenth through the early seventeenth century. The course welcomes students studying literature and literary criticism; it also welcomes creative writers looking to explore the historical backgrounds of their craft.


LTEN 124 - TOPICS: THE NINETEENTH CEN (b) 
Victorian Pseudoscience 
Instructor: Margaret Loose

What’s the difference between science and pseudoscience, and why does it matter?  And what do novelists, poets, and philosophers have to do with it?  This course seeks to answer such provocative questions with the help of the Victorians, who coined the term “scientist” and were the first to turn the endeavor into a credentialed profession in an effort to distinguish it from the merely folkloric and traditional, not to mention the patently fraudulent.  They had their work cut out for them.  From electromagnetic belts, hair brushes, and rings to pills, syrups, and cakes; from mesmerism to fairies and phrenology, the Victorians had as many unreliable ideas as we do today.  Eminent 19th century scientists such as Michael Faraday conducted experiments aimed at falsifying or validating such occult claims as spirit communication and clairvoyance, and eminent writers like Dickens, Eliot, Browning, Gaskell, Collins, Brontë, and A.C. Doyle conducted parallel investigations, attacked and defended propositions, exposed (and indulged in) cognitive flaws, and shaped public perceptions of scientific and paranormal claims and practices.  We will study the crossroads between literature and pseudoscience, reading ghost stories, advertising, satires, poems, and essays about séances, “race science,” table-rapping, and anti-quackery campaigns.  We will also read healthy doses of modern literary and philosophical scholarship to help us contextualize and debate the problems these issues inevitably pose for us in the here and now.


LTEN 140 - EARLY 19TH CENT. BRITISH NOVEL (b)
Gothic Fiction 
Instructor: Sarah Nicolazzo

Dismissed by reviewers as "terrorist novel-writing" and satirized by Jane Austen in Northanger Abbey, the explosion of fiction we now call “gothic” provoked both aesthetic controversy and intense readerly demand. From Horace Walpole's Castle of Otranto to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and some of the earliest works of American gothic fiction, we'll explore the origins of some of the foundational texts, tropes, and ideas that continue to inform our idea of horror today. We'll also combine literary analysis with the history of reading and publication, as we trace how the immense popularity of this genre revolutionized the print industry and contributed to the development of entirely new ways readers bought, circulated, and responded to books. At the same time, we'll ask the very questions that compelled the original readers of gothic fiction: why do we want to be terrified? How can texts exert such powerful influence on the minds of their readers?

Fulfills the B requirement of the Literatures in English major.


LTEN 149 - THEMES/ENGLISH&AMERICAN LIT (a)
Antisemitism in English Lit 
Instructor: Lisa Lampert-Weissig

In this course we will consider representations of Jews and Judaism and the role of anti-Semitism and philo-Semitism in English literature of both the pre-modern and modern periods. We will consider both historical context and the question of whether anti-Semitism is implicated in aesthetics. Readings include Chaucer's Prioress's Tale, Marlowe's Jew of Malta, Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice, Edgeworth's Harrington, du Maurier's Trilby and poetry by T.S. Eliot. This course fulfills the "a" requirement.


LTEN 150 - GENDER, TEXT, AND CULTURE (c) 
Miscegenation Nation 
Instructor: Nicole Tonkovich

Pocahontas’s supposed love for John Smith and her marriage to John Rolfe have founded a cherished myth of American origins. This story anticipates the nation’s ongoing obsession with interracial romance, marriage, and the production of “natural-born American citizens,” to quote a term current in this year’s presidential politics. In this course we will read a number of literary treatments of such couplings, tracing their relation to settler colonial wars, imperial expansion, and the consequent legal fictions of citizenship and naturalization. Our readings will include “To Marry an Indian,” the letters of Harriet Gold and Elias Boudinot; William Wells Brown’s Clotel, in which the relationship of Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings plays a central role; and Mark Twain’s Pudd’n’head Wilson, whose protagonist Roxy is proud of her descent from the First Families of Virginia and the “Smith-Pocahontases.” We will read shorter works, as well, including sketches and fictions by Sui Sin Far and Charles Chesnutt.


LTEN 152 - ORIGINS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE (c)
Race in Early America 
Instructor: Sarah Nicolazzo

What did "race" mean in America before 1800? What does American literary history look like if we place the question of race at the center? This course examines some of the earliest historical roots of American racial inequality by examining how literary texts of colonial America and the early years of the new republic define, represent, and debate race. Topics include literary representations and critiques of slavery, the role of race in early American scientific thought, and how authors of color portrayed America both before and after US independence. Finally, we will conclude with a current portrayal of early America in popular culture: Lin-Manuel Miranda's Hamilton: An American Musical, which has sparked an ongoing and vital public conversation on race, representation, and the stories we do and don't tell about early America.

Fulfills the C requirement of the Literatures in English major.


LTEN 154 - THE AMERICAN RENAISSANCE (c) 
But Is It Any Good? 
Instructor: Nicole Tonkovich

The advent of feminist literary critique in the 1980s appeared to have dismantled the idea that the work of a half-dozen white men comprised the canon of mid-nineteenth-century U. S. literature. Arguably, such has not been the case. Students and educated readers alike continue to identify Hawthorne, Poe, Whitman, Melville, Thoreau, and Emerson as those whose work defines this period.

In this course we will read the work of four of the plethora of women who wrote during this period: Fanny Fern’s Ruth Hall, E. D. E. N. Southworth’s The Hidden Hand, Julia C. Collins’s The Curse of Caste, and Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton’s Who Would Have Thought It? In the process we will discuss these questions: By what criteria to we measure the literary worth of a text? Do those criteria change? Who read these books in the moment of their publication? In what media? How did the work of these women writers engage the cultural conversations of their moment? Are their works still relevant? Do they have the potential to change our perception of this period of literary production?


LTEN 158 - MODERN AMERICAN LITERATURE (d)
American Life from 1880 to 1925: A Multidisciplinary Approach 
Instructor: Steven Cassedy

In this course we will study the enormous transformation that American life underwent at the end of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth. The transformation affected all levels of life: the purely physical (mortality and life expectancy), the social (the waning of individualism and the rise of community as a basic social principle), the political (the great Era of Reform), the religious (the rise of social consciousness in American Protestantism and Judaism), the scientific (the dominance of evolutionary theory and modern psychology), and the cultural (the rise of convention-defying practices in literature, visual arts, and music). We will study all these dimensions of life at the turn of the century and finish with a brief treatment of the African American cultural flowering known as the Harlem Renaissance. The course will include musical presentations, with piano performance and recorded music.


LTEN 159 - CONTEMPORARY AMER LITERATURE 
Techno-Orientalism 
Instructor: Erin Suzuki

Why are Asians, and Asia, so closely associated with ideas about technology, globalization, and the future? This course will focus on the evolution of these “techno-Orientalist” assumptions through critical analyses of popular texts, speculative fictions, and films from the early twentieth century through the present. From the machine-line

Chinese “coolie” that haunted the racial imaginations of the early twentieth century to the superhuman cyborgs that populate the contemporary science fictional landscape, this course will explore the ways that Asian bodies have become exoticized through their relationship with technology, and vice versa.


LTEN 171 - COMP ISS IN LATINO/A IM IN US
Mexican, Central American and Caribbean Immigration to the U.S. 
Instructor: Rosaura Sánchez

This course will examine the representation of Mexican, Central American and Caribbean immigration to the U.S. in recent Latino/a literature by looking first at a series of articles that focus on recent factors triggering emigration, including imperialism, globalization, dictatorship, war, and violence, and then examining how these issues are constructed in both film and fiction: in novels by Graciela Limón, Ana Castillo, Héctor Tobar, and Angie Cruz and in four films.  Students will write two short papers,  take two exams (mid-term and final), and do an oral presentation to the class.


LTEN 175A - NEW AMER FICTION:WWII-PRESENT (d) 
Gay, Lesbian, Queer US Literature 
Instructor: Meg Wesling

This course examines debates around the formation of a gay and lesbian literary canon, and reads a variety of 20th century fiction with an eye toward what such literature tells us about changing understandings of sexuality and identity, particularly in relation to questions of gender, race, and class. Authors will include Nella Larsen, James Baldwin, Monique Truong, Dorothy Allison, Toni Morrison, and Alison Bechdel, among others. 


LTEN 185 - THEMES/AFRO-AMERICN LITERATURE (d) 
(Crosslisted with ETHN 174) 
Instructor: Dennis Childs

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTEN Upper Division Codes:

(a) = British Literature before 1660
(b) = British Literature after 1660
(c) = U.S. Literature before 1860
(d) = U.S. Literature after 1860

LTEU 158 - SINGLE AUTHOR IN RUSSIAN LIT 
Nabokov 
(Crosslisted with LTRU 123) 
Instructor: Kevin Hart

This course will examine the work of Vladimir Nabokov, the Russian-American novelist responsible for Lolita, numerous innovations in narrative style, and the discovery of new species of butterfly.  The course will focus in equal parts on Nabokov’s Russian and English works.  All reading will be in English.  We will explore aesthetic and moral problems in Nabokov’s novels and stories, themes of exile and multiculturalism, humor and the performances of authorship, sex, gender, violence, science, and psychology.


LTFR 002A - INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I 
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTFR 002B - INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II 
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTFR 021 - CONVERSATION WORKSHOP I 
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTFR 031 - CONVERSATION WORKSHOP II 
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTFR 050 - INTERMED. FRENCH II/TEXT ANALY 
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTFR 141 - FRENCH LITERATURE 
Instructor: Oumelbanine Zhiri

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTFR 164 - FRENCH CIVILIZATION 
French Identity through film 
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

In the wake of “Je suis Charlie” and the November 13th attacks in and around Paris, debates about what it means to be French have taken a new urgency. We will analyze how various contemporary filmmakers are addressing this same question. Discussions will be conducted in French. Films in French with English subtitles. French minors and majors are expected to write papers in French.


LTGM 002C - INTERMEDIATE GERMAN III 
Instructor: Jeannette Mohr

LTGM 2C is the last part of a three course series and emphasizes the development of better reading ability, listening comprehension, conversational and writing skills. We’ll keep using both, the textbook and the workbook Anders Gedacht“ in its third edition.  Our goal is to finish reading Am kuerzeren Ende der Sonnenallee“ by Thomas Brussig and then - as a treat  watch and discuss the highly successful movie version at the end of the quarter. The course includes grammar review and class discussion of reading and audio-visual materials. 


LTGM 130 - GERMAN LITERARY PROSE 
Instructor: William O'Brien

Fairy tales for adults?  It seems to be a contradiction.
Yet fairy tales have always been written—and even spoken—for adults.  After all, it has always been adults who have transmitted them to children—with pleasure.  And there are fairy tales written only for adults.
            The most famous fairy-tale collection from Germany is that of the Brothers Grimm, who began publishing their Kinder- und Hausmärchen in 1812.  Its appearance marked the high-point of a renewed interest in fairy tales that had begun with the Romantics during the final years of the 18th—when fairy tales, written exclusively for adults, were in high fashion.
            This course will concentrate on the intensive close reading of fairy tales for adults (with the exception, perhaps, of one tale from the Brothers Grimm, which deals with a very adult  issue).  We will not read many stories, but we will read our stories in detail and with great care.  The pace of the course will follow from the interests and abilities of the class members.
Readings will be drawn from:
Die Brüder Grimm, “Der Froschkönig” and “Rumpestilzchen”
Ludwig Tieck, “Die Elfen”
Friedrich de la Motte-Fouqué, Undine
Adelbert von Chamisso, Peter Schlemihls wundersame Geschichte

            All readings in German.  Class discussions in English and German.  3 three- to four-page papers.


LTGK 003 - INTERMEDIATE GREEK II 
Instructor: Leslie Edwards

In the third quarter of first-year Greek, we’ll complete the final third of Shelmerdine‘s Introduction to Greek.  Besides some new grammar, this text presents a number of interesting and beautiful passages of real (or slightly adapted) Greek prose from such writers as Plato and Thucydides. There will also be, of course, some quizzes, a midterm, and a final. Prerequisite: Greek 2 or permission of the instructor.


LTIT 050 - ADVANCED ITALIAN 
Instructor: Adriana De Marchi Gherini

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTIT 161 - ADV STYLISTICS&CONVERSATION 
CONVERSAZIONE E STILISTICA 
Instructor: Adriana De Marchi Gherini

L'italiano può fare tranelli, creare difficoltà anche per le persone di madre lingua e ovviamente gli studenti!
Qual è il plurale di valigia:  valige o valigie?  Perché si scrive "qual è" e non "qual'è?"
Perché "scuola" e non "squola?"
Come trattiamo le parole straniere accettate nella lingua italiana?
Questo corso risponde a queste e altre domande sulla lingua italiana, e incoraggia la conversazione su argomenti di cultura contemporanea.

Italian can be tricky, for both native speakers and learners.
How do you pluralize the word "valigia:"  "valige" o "valigie?"  Why do we write "qual è" and not "qual'è?"
Why "scuola" and not "squola?"
What do we do with foreign words that become part of the Italian lexicon?
This course will answer these (and many more) questions, in addition to having a weekly conversation hour on contemporary culture topics.

For more information about the UCSD Korean Language Program please visit http://ucsdkoreanlanguage.blogspot.com/


LTKO 001B - BEGINNING KOREAN:FIRST YR. II 
Instructor: Jeyseon Lee

First Year Korean 1B (5 units) is the second part of the Beginning Korean series. This course is designed to assist students to develop mid-beginning level skills in the Korean language. These skills are speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as cultural understanding. LTKO 1B is designed for students who have already mastered the materials covered in LTKO 1A or who are already in the equivalent proficiency level. This course will focus on grammatical patterns, such as sentence structures, some simple grammatical points, and some survival level use of the Korean language. Additionally, speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension will all be emphasized, with special attention to oral speech. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following in Korean:

Speaking: Students are able to handle successfully a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks in straightforward social situations. Conversation is generally limited to those predictable and concrete exchange necessary for survival in the target culture. They are capable of asking a variety of questions when necessary to obtain simple information to satisfy basic needs.

Listening: Students are able to understand simple, sentence-length speech, one utterance at a time, in variety of basic personal and social contexts. Comprehension is most often accurate with highly familiar and predictable topics although a few misunderstandings may occur.

Reading: Students are able to understand short, non-complex texts that convey basic information and deal with basic personal and social topics to which they bring personal interest or knowledge, although some misunderstandings may occur. They may get some meaning from short connected texts featuring description and narration, dealing with familiar topics.

Writing: Students are able to meet a number of practical writing needs. They can write short, simple communications, compositions, and requests for information in loosely connected texts about personal preferences, daily routines, common events, and other personal topics.


LTKO 001C - BEGINNING KOREAN:FIRST YR. III 
Instructor: Jeyseon Lee

First Year Korean 1C (5 units) is the third part of the Beginning Korean. This course is designed to assist students to develop high-beginning level skills in the Korean language. These skills are speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as cultural understanding. LTKO 1C is designed for students who have already mastered LTKO 1B or who are already in the equivalent proficiency level. This course will focus on grammatical patterns such as sentence structures, some simple grammatical points, and some survival level use of Korean language. Additionally, speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension will all be emphasized, with special attention to oral speech. Upon completion of this course, students will become able to do the following in Korean:

Speaking: Students are able to converse with ease and confidence when dealing with the routine tasks and social situations. They are able to handle successfully uncomplicated tasks and social situations requiring an exchange of basic information. They can narrate and describe in all major time frames using connected discourse of paragraph length, but not all the time.

Listening: Students are able to understand, with ease and confidence, simple sentence-length speech in basic personal and social contexts. They can derive substantial meaning from some connected texts, although there often will be gaps in understanding due to a limited knowledge of the vocabulary and structure of the spoken language.

Reading: Students are able to understand fully and with ease short, non-complex texts that convey basic information and deal with personal and social topics to which they brings personal interest or knowledge. They are able to understand some connected texts featuring description and narration although there will be occasional gaps in understanding due to a limited knowledge of the vocabulary, structures, and writing conventions of the language.

Writing: Students are able to meet all practical writing needs of the basic level. They also can write compositions and simple summaries related to work and/or school experiences. They can narrate and describe in different time frames when writing about everyday events and situations.


LTKO 002A - INTERMEDIATE KOREAN:2ND YR I 
Instructor: Jeyseon Lee

Second Year Korean 2A is the first part of the Intermediate Korean. Students in this course are assumed to have previous knowledge of Korean, which was taught in the Korean 1A, 1B, and 1C courses. Students in this course will learn low-intermediate level skills in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Korean, as well as expand their cultural understanding. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to acquire and use more vocabularies, expressions and sentence structures and to have a good command of Korean in various conversational situations. Students are expected to write short essays using the vocabularies, expressions, and sentence structures introduced. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following in Korean:

Speaking: Students are able to handle a variety of communicative tasks. They are able to participate in most informal and some formal conversations on topics related to school, home, and leisure activities. Students demonstrate the ability to narrate and describe in the major time frames in paragraph-length discourse. They show the ability  to combine and link sentences into connected discourse of paragraph length.

Listening: Students are able to understand short conventional narrative and descriptive texts with a clear underlying structure though their comprehension may uneven. They understand the main facts and some supporting details. Comprehension may often derive primarily from situation and subject-matter knowledge.

Reading: Students are able to understand conventional narrative and descriptive texts with a clear underlying structure though their comprehension may be uneven. These texts predominantly contain high-frequency vocabulary and structure. Students understand the main ideas and some supporting details. Comprehension may often derive primarily from situational and subject-matter knowledge.

Writing: Students are able to meet basic work and/or academic writing needs. They are able to compose simple summaries on familiar topics. They are able to combine and link sentences into texts of paragraph length and structure. They demonstrate the ability to incorporate a limited number of cohesive devices.


LTKO 002C - INTERMEDIATE KOREAN:SECOND YR 
Instructor: Jeyseon Lee

Second Year Korean 2C (5 units) is the third part of the Intermediate Korean. Students in this course are assumed to have previous knowledge of Korean, which was taught during the Korean 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A and 2B courses. Students in this course will learn high-intermediate level of standard modern Korean in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as expand their cultural understanding. After the completion of this course, students are expected to acquire and use more vocabularies, expressions, and sentence structures and to have a good command of Korean in various conversational situations. Students are also expected to write short essays using the vocabularies, expressions, and sentence structures introduced. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following in Korean:

Speaking: Students can perform all intermediate-level tasks with linguistic ease, confidence, and competence. They are consistently able to explain in detail and narrate fully and accurately in all time frame. In addition, they may provide a structured argument to support their opinions, and they may construct hypotheses. They may demonstrate a well-developed ability to compensate for an imperfect grasp of some forms or for limitations in vocabulary by the confident use of communicative strategies.

Listening: Students are able to understand, with ease and confidence, conventional narrative and descriptive texts of any length as well as complex factual material such as summaries or reports. They are able to follow some of the essential points of more complex or argumentative speech in areas of special interest or knowledge.

Reading: Students are able to understand, fully and with ease, conventional narrative and descriptive texts of any length as well as more complex factual material. They are able to follow some of the essential points of argumentative texts in areas of special interest or knowledge. In addition, they are able to understand parts of texts that deal with unfamiliar topics or situations.

Writing: Students are able to write about a variety of topics with significant precision and detail. They can handle informal and formal correspondence according to appropriate conventions. They can write summaries and reports of a factual nature. They can also write extensively about topics relating to particular interests and special areas of competence.


LTKO 003 - ADVANCED KOREAN/THIRD YEAR 
Instructor: Jeyseon Lee

Third Year Korean 3C (5 units) is the third part of the advanced Korean. Students in this course are assumed to have previous knowledge of Korean, which was taught in the Korean 2A, 2B, 2C, 3A and 3B courses. Students in this course will learn high-advanced level skills in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Korean, as well as expand their cultural understanding. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to acquire and use more vocabularies, expressions and sentence structures and to have a good command of Korean in formal situations. Students are expected to read and understand daily newspapers and daily news broadcasts. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following in Korean:

Speaking: Students are able to communicate with accuracy and fluency in order to participate fully and effectively in conversations on a variety of topics in formal and informal settings from both concrete and abstract perspectives. They discuss their interests and special fields of competence, explain complex matters in detail, and provide lengthy and coherent narrations, all with ease, fluency, and accuracy. They present their opinions on a number of issues of interest to them, and provide structured arguments to support these opinions.

Listening: Students are able to understand speech in a standard dialect on a wide range of familiar and less familiar topics. They can follow linguistically complex extended discourse. Comprehension is no longer limited to the listener's familiarity with subject matter, but also comes from a command of the language that is supported by a broad vocabulary, an understanding of more complex structures and linguistic experience within the target culture. Students can understand not only what is said, but sometimes what is left unsaid.

Reading: Students are able to understand texts from many genres dealing with a wide range of subjects, both familiar and unfamiliar. Comprehension is no longer limited to the reader's familiarity with subject matter, but also comes from a command of the language that is supported by a broad vocabulary, an understanding of complex structures and knowledge of the target culture. Students at this level can draw inferences from textual and extralinguistic clues.

Writing: Students are able to produce most kinds of formal and informal correspondence, in-depth summaries, reports, and research papers. They demonstrate the ability to explain complex matters, and to present and support opinions by developing cogent arguments and hypotheses. They demonstrate a high degree of control of grammar and syntax, of general vocabulary, of spelling or symbol production, of cohesive devices, and of punctuation.


LTKO 100 - ADV READNGS/KOREAN LIT&CULTURE 
Readings in Modern Korean Literature and Culture 
Instructor: Jin-kyung Lee

This course is a survey of key historical issues in modern Korea from 1920s to the present.  We will read major authors from the colonial period, such as Yŏm Sang-sŏp, Ch’oe Sŏ-hae, Kim Yu-jŏng, Yi T’ae-jun, and Yi Kwang-su, as well as literary works by canonical South Korean writers such as Choi In-hun, Cho Se-hui, Hwang Sok-yong, Pak Wan-so, and O Chong-hui. We will examine broader social issues as represented by literature such as the changing colonial state policies, the ideological struggle between bourgeois nationalists and Marxists, national division, the U.S./Soviet occupation, the Korean War, authoritarian rule, industrialization, and labor/agrarian movements. This course is designed both as an advanced reading class and as an introduction to Korean literature, culture and history.  Students who have completed three years of Korean at the college level as well as those who have literacy in Korean through informal and formal training may qualify to take this class.

LTKO 100 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTLA 003 - INTERMEDIATE LATIN II 
Instructor: Eliot Wirshbo

At first, this course will resemble the previous two: slow progress through chapters expounding arcane grammar, quizzes every fourth class day or so, mid-term that's fairly comprehensive, until ... the sky suddenly opens up and the sun casts a light that bathes all in 

its golden glow and we begin to read the words of ancient authors themselves in increasingly unaltered form. But don't start to exult just yet: this isn't the glorious experience it sounds as if it may be. Instead, it's a time when all the various grammatical rules have to be brought to bear on every phrase, so that the detective work just becomes more intense, albeit with some reward and satisfaction when it comes to 'solving' whole 'cases.'


LTLA 003 - INTERMEDIATE LATIN II 
Instructor: Leslie Edwards

In the third and final quarter of first-year Latin, we’ll complete McKeown’s Classical Latintextbook. Then we’ll turn to some passages of real Latin written by real Romans. There will be some quizzes, a midterm and a final. Also, fewer pigs. Prerequisite: Latin 2 or permission of the instructor.


LTLA 135 - DRAMA 
Instructor: Eliot Wirshbo

Upper-division Latin students who've recently toiled through the Philosophical Fables of Phaedrus and the Sesquipedalian Speeches of Cicero and the Hoary Hortations of Horace and the Somnifacient Sallies of Sallust can now sit back, relax, and enjoy the Powerful Pleasures of Plautus. Yes, it's time to stop with the seriousness and get to laugh for a term. There'll be nothing but hilarious hijinks as our author renders another play from a Greek original, tampering with it just enough to keep his Roman groundlings guffawing rather than cutting out of the theater and watching a bear dance or a rope climber at a nearby venue do his feats.

There exists a good student edition of the play, containing both notes and vocabulary (and comprehension questions to keep us alert), so we'll have all we need before us to pause and emit cacchinos at ... every 12th line or so?

All the usual strictures apply about testing and paper.


LTRU 001C - FIRST-YEAR RUSSIAN 
Instructor: Rebecca Wells

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTRU 002C - SECOND-YEAR RUSSIAN 
Instructor: Rebecca Wells

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTRU 123 - SINGLE AUTHOR IN RUSSIAN LIT 
Nabokov 
(Crosslisted with LTEU 158) 
Instructor: Kevin Hart

This course will examine the work of Vladimir Nabokov, the Russian-American novelist responsible for Lolita, numerous innovations in narrative style, and the discovery of new species of butterfly.  The course will focus in equal parts on Nabokov’s Russian and English works.  All reading will be in English.  We will explore aesthetic and moral problems in Nabokov’s novels and stories, themes of exile and multiculturalism, humor and the performances of authorship, sex, gender, violence, science, and psychology.


LTSP 002A - READINGS AND COMPOSITION 
Instructor: Beatrice Pita

This 5 unit intermediate course meets 4 days per week and is taught entirely in Spanish. LTSP 2A emphasizes the development of communicative skills, reading ability, listening comprehension and writing skills. It includes grammar review, short readings, class discussions and working with Spanish-language video and Internet materials. This course is designed to prepare students for LTSP 2B and 2C. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisites: Completion of LISP 1C/CX, its equivalent, or a score of 3 on the AP Spanish language exam.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2A is scheduled for SATURDAY, JUNE 4th, 2016.

Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with  any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 002B - READINGS & INTERPRETATIONS 
Instructor: Beatrice Pita

This intermediate course is designed for students who wish to improve their grammatical competence, ability to speak, read and write Spanish. It is a continuation of LTSP 2A with special emphasis on problems in writing and interpretation. Students meet with the instructor 4 days per week. Work for this 5 unit course includes oral presentations, grammar review, writing assignments, class discussions on the readings and work with Spanish-language video and Internet materials. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisites: Completion of LTSP 2A, its equivalent, or a score of 4 on the AP Spanish language exam.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2B is scheduled for SATURDAY, JUNE 4th, 2016.

Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with  any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 002C - CULTURAL READINGS&COMPOSITION 
Instructor: Beatrice Pita

The goal of this intermediate language course is twofold: to further develop all skill areas in Spanish and to increase Spanish language-based cultural literacy. LTSP 2C is a continuation of the LTSP second-year sequence with special emphasis on problems in grammar, writing and translation. It includes class discussions of cultural topics as well as grammar review and composition assignments. The course will further develop the ability to read articles, essays and longer pieces of fictional and non-fictional texts as well as the understanding of Spanish-language materials on the Internet. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisite: Completion of LTSP 2B, its equivalent, or a score of 5 on the AP Spanish language exam. This course satisfies the third course requirement of the college-required language sequence as well as the language requirement for participation in UC-EAP.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2C is scheduled for SATURDAY, JUNE 4th, 2016.

Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with  any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 002D - INTER/ADV SPANISH 
Instructor: Beatrice Pita

Designed for bilingual students who have been exposed to Spanish at home but have little or no formal training in Spanish. The goal is for students who are comfortable understanding, reading and speaking in Spanish to further develop existing skills and to acquire greater oral fluency, and grammatical control  through grammar review, and reading and writing practice. Building on existing strengths, the course will allow students  to develop a variety of Spanish language strategies to express themselves in Spanish with greater ease and precision. Prepares native-speakers for  more advanced courses. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisite: Native speaking ability and/or recommendation of instructor.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2D is scheduled for SATURDAY, JUNE 4th, 2016.

Enrollment for LTSP 2D requires department pre-authorization; contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with  any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 002E - ADVNCD READINGS/COMPOSITION 
Instructor: Beatrice Pita

An advanced/intermediate course designed for bilingual students who may or may not have studied Spanish formally, but possess good oral skills and seek to become fully bilingual and biliterate. Reading and writing skills stressed with special emphasis on improvement of written expression, vocabulary development and problems of grammar and orthography. Prepares native-speakers with a higher level of oral proficiency for  more advanced courses. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisite: Native speaking ability and/or recommendation of instructor.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2E is scheduled for SATURDAY, JUNE 4th, 2016.

Enrollment for LTSP 2E requires department pre-authorization; contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with  any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 041 - CONVERSATION & ORTHOGRAPHY 
Instructor: Beatrice Pita

Designed to allow students with a basic grounding in Spanish to discuss a variety of topics related to current cultural issues. Focus will be on vocabulary development, use of idiomatic expressions and advancing oral proficiency in Spanish. Orthography rules will be a secondary focus in this workshop. Pre-requisites: LISP 1C/CX or consent of the instructor. Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with  any questions regarding placement.

Note: This conversation/discussion class meets once a week. May be taken as an adjunct to lower  division LTSP courses, alone,  or in combination with any other LTSP course. Recommended for students planning to study abroad.  May be taken 3 times for credit as topics vary. May be taken P/NP or for a letter grade.


LTSP 050C - READINGS/LATIN AMERICAN TOPICS 
Instructor: Beatrice Pita

This course introduces students to literary analysis through the close textual reading of a selection of Latin American texts including novels, plays, short fiction and poetry. Coursework includes reading of texts, participation in class discussions and written assignments. LTSP 50C prepares Literature majors and minors for upper-division work. LTSP 50A or 50B or 50C are required for Spanish Literature majors. May be applied towards a minor in Spanish Literature or towards fulfilling the second literature requirement for Literature majors. Prerequisites: Completion of LTSP 2C, 2D, 2E or 2 years of college level Spanish.

Notes: The Final Exam for LTSP 50C is scheduled for SATURDAY, JUNE 4th, 2016.

Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with  any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 116 - REPRESENTATNS/SPAN COLONIALISM 
Representations of Spanish Colonialism
Instructor: John Blanco

Este curso pondrá en juego tres “ordenes” del representar el colonialismo el los siglos 16, 19, y 20, comprarándolos y yuxtaponiéndolos para analizar las continuidades y rupturas del colonialismo en función de una forma peculiar de la dominación y resistencia.  Menos la singularidad del descubrimiento y Conquista del Nuevo Mundo, los países latinoamericanos y Filipinas parecen a primera vista seguir el mismo camino como todos otros países europeos (incluso los EEUU): la industrialización, la formación del Estado, la promulgación de la república constitucional y los derechos de la ciudadanía, la incorporación de las naciones nuevas a la economía mundial, etc.  Sin embargo, bajo esta superficie la herencia de la Conquista, la representación del Nuevo Mundo y sus habitantes como el “Otro” (la negación del ser humano, el salvaje), y el orden colonial persisten en influenciar el presente “pos-colonial” de América Latina y Filipinas, creando o manteniendo varias formas de desigualdad, injusticia, y violencia sistémica.  Exploraremos las políticas del colonialismo mediante sus representaciones poéticas.

LTSP 116 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTSP 140 - LATIN AMERICAN NOVEL 
The “ Queendom” of Corruption
Instructor: Jaime Concha

Corruption, delinquency ( more high than  low), drug traffic, etc. have become endemic phenomena of many, if not all, Latin American countries.

Through  a  few  recent narrative texts, we will see how all these  symptoms  are treated  in literature. There  will  be Colombian, Chilean and Argentinean works, all of them extremely  short. As a “delicatesse” and for the sake of actuality, we’ll start with La reina del sur, the basis for the current  soap-opera including  “ Chapo”, del Castillo, and  Penn.

Two exams, one intermediate, one  final, both with equal value.

LTSP 140 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTSP 176 - LITERATURE AND NATION
Instructor: Gloria Chacon

This course will focus on the relationship between nation and literature in Latin America. We will pay particular attention to the overarching questions: how do national literatures get established? Who participates in the process? By focusing on key texts and early debates around civilization and barbarism in the nineteenth century as well as questions of modernity and tradition in the twentieth century, you will learn about ongoing debates around nation, literature, and citizenship. Students will read poetry and novels as well as essays to think through competing narratives about who belongs and who is excluded from national literatures. Discussions and writing will be conducted in Spanish. All readings will be uploaded to TritonEd.


LTWL 004D - FICTION&FILM/20TH CEN/ITALIAN
Instructor: Pasquale Verdicchio

LTWL 4D is a course in Italian Cinema that requires no knowledge of Italian or previous training in film studies.  It is a course geared to anyone with an interest in Film, Culture, Literature and Social issues.  The course will address themes related to changes in social and cultural landscapes as manifested in film from the immediate post-WWII period to our day, including the current migrations across the Mediterranean.  From the first days of NeoRealism Italian cinema has provided a set of instruments through which it attempted to discuss the complexities of national culture.  In this manner Italian NeoRealism became a point of reference for other cinemas around the world dealing with similar issues of national hegemony in a context of cultural diversity. Neorealism continues to show its influence in Italian cinema itself in unexpected contexts, re-incarnations, revivals, renewals, citations, etc.  Our progression through this course will deal with these and other parameters of film-making and the social/political function of the manufactured image.


LTWL 019C - INTRO/ANCIENT GREEKS & ROMANS 
Instructor: Eliot Wirshbo

The study of ancient Rome brings us into touch with a much more accessible and familiar civilization than the Greek. Through a disparate assortment of literary genres -- comedy, oratory, epic poetry, history, love poetry, epigram, ethnography, and satire -- the course will trace the life and thought of the Romans, ever attentive to parallels pertinent to our own period. Two five-page papers, mid-term, five pop quizzes, final exam, scintillating lectures.


LTWL 100 - MYTHOLOGY
Myths of the Ancient Near East
Instructor: Jacobo Myerston

Long before the ancient Greeks and Romans had formed their nations, the people of the ancient Near East had developed a wide range of stories about the gods, heroes, and demons.  These are the oldest myths in the history of humanity that have survived in written form; they were of great influence in the ancient world, and even had considerable impact on Greek mythology and the Bible. This class explores these millennia-old mythical stories about the origins of the universe and human kind. During the quarter, we will read Atra-hasis, the oldest attested version of the flood story, which inspired the famous narrative about Noah’s ark, the epic of Gilgamesh, the story of the sage Adapa, the myth of the goddess Ishtar and her journey to the underworld, as well as a series of hymns and magical incantations with mythological context.


LTWL 106 - THE CLASSICAL TRADITION 
Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey
Instructor: Anthony Edwards

The focus for this class will be reading and discussing Homer’s two epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey. The poems are long, but even at that I expect there will be time for a leisurely and deep reading of these two books. Although Homer’s reputation as a storyteller has held up over the years, aspects of the way he spins a yarn and of the moral universe in which his characters act can strike readers as unfamiliar and even puzzling. So, I’ll devote time to constructing from evidence in the poems a historical context for our reading. There will be lecture and discussion, a reading quiz for each poem, a paper, and a final exam; maybe we’ll watch a movie or two as well.


LTWL 116 - ADOLESCENT LITERATURE 
Rites of Passage
Instructor: Stephen Potts

Probably the greatest transition in human life is the passage from childhood into adolescence. Puberty embodies the first steps to adulthood, when one leaves behind the relative innocence and simplicity of childhood and begins to develop a mature perspective on self and social relations. In more traditional societies, this transition is represented by a formal “rite of passage,” in which the young person is inducted into the adult life of his/her community. Modern life, with its challenges to tradition, its rapid change, and its diversity, complicates this process. Young adolescent (YA) literature has responded, especially since the social revolutions of the 1960s, wrestling in often sophisticated (and entertaining!) ways with these complexities. In this course we will explore a number of novels classifiable as YA, representing a range of genres from stark realism to outright fantasy and a variety of topics from the hero’s journey to racial/cultural identity. Join us on the adventure.

LTWL 116 is a LTEN equivalent course


LTWL 138 - CRITICAL RELIGION STUDIES 
Instructor: Dayna Kalleres

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWL 165 - LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMNT 
Instructor: Pasquale Verdicchio

This course should appeal to students of environmental studies, social sciences and literature majors.  It is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplinesincluding cultural studies, intellectual history, literary analysis, religious studies, and philosophyto understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, indigenous perspectives on the environment, and investigations of the root causes of environmental problems.  Course will include readings of work by Barry Lopez, Aldo Leopold, Ursula LeGuin, Wilma Mankiller and Terry Tempest Williams.


LTWL 181 - FILM STUDIES&LIT:FILM MOVEMENT
New German Cinema
Instructor: Todd Kontje

From the late 1960s until the early 1980s, German film experienced a renaissance that has come to be known as the New German Cinema. Deliberately opposed to the commercial aesthetic of Hollywood films, the German directors stamped their works with distinctly individual creative visions. We will view and discuss the works of such directors as Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Werner Herzog, Volker Schlöndorff, and Wim Wenders in films that engage the difficult topics of the times: feminism, terrorism, the place of foreigners in Germany, the image of America, and the looming presence of the Nazi past.


LTWL 183 - FILM STUDIES&LIT:DIRECTOR WORK 
Iñárritu: Postmodern Filmmaker
Instructor: Alain Cohen

Film director Alejandro González Iñárritu’s work displays a mastery of film narrative and of film form, along with a personal film style. In the unfolding of his films, he enjoys playing at the cutting edge of intersecting lives and intersecting narrative accounts. In so doing, he also manifests a keen search for his characters’ motivations (helped by a few prominent actors of our times) and a specific philosophical vision of the world. We shall focus on an in depth study of 21 Grams (2003), Babel (2006) Birdman (2014) for which he earned three Oscars, wherein the philosophical aspects of postmodernism are underscored. Excerpts and clips from his first film, Amores Perros (2000) and his latest one, The Revenant (2015), will provide bookends to the class discussions.

As usual, precise methods of film analysis  frame and shot composition, shot-by-shot analysis, narrative programs, filmic figures, film genre,  deep structure, integration of specific films into the history of cinema, and filmic poetics  will be emphasized during the first weeks of the term. Students will explore the case of the compelling style of Iñárritu’s films. “Veteran” students will be asked for work building upon their previous research.

LTWL 183 is a LTEN equivalent course
LTWL 183 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement


LTWL 192 - SENIOR SEMINAR 
Zombies: An Unnatural History
Instructor: Lisa Lampert-Weissig

Why are zombies so popular right now? Is the current craze just mindless fun or are there political and social subtexts to consider? We'll examine the origins of the zombie figure, zombie films of the 1930s and 40s, George Romero's Night of the Living Dead (1968), The Walking Dead and World War Z. More information at www.talesofthenight.org. Prerequisites: Upper division standing or consent of the professor. Students should contact the department through the VAC to be pre-authorized to enroll in the seminar.


Read before signing up for LTWR courses: Enrollment in Literature Writing Courses


LTWR 008A - WRITING: FICTION 
Instructor: Anna Joy Springer

This course introduces many of the basic elements of contemporary fiction, including characterization, style, point-of-view, dialogue, theme, and narrative structure. Emphasis will be placed upon writing first from your most unfettered imagination, AND upon sculpting these wild writings into shapely short stories through a variety of creative revision techniques. Each week we will read both conventional and innovative short stories published (mostly) in the last thirty years, in order to discuss in context the fiction-writing techniques you’ll be practicing in your own writing. We will read 2-3 short stories a week. To explore craft and experimentation, there will be a number of writing exercises, both in and outside of class, which will help to generate a final short story as the quarter progresses. You will turn in a 2-page story every week for group discussion and both draft and revised versions of a 10-page story at the end of the quarter. There will be a midterm and a final exam on all readings and terms of fictional craft. Writing exercises and drafts will be reviewed in small groups led by undergraduate workshop leaders in order to facilitate your creative revision, revision, and revision process. REQUIRED COURSE TEXTS: 1. What It Is by Lynda Barry; 2. Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft (8th Ed.) by Janet Burroway and Elizabeth & Ned Stuckey-French.


LTWR 008C - WRITING NON-FICTION 
Instructor: Camille Forbes

This course introduces two forms of literary nonfiction: the interview and the memoir piece. Our focus will be mainly on reading and discussing these forms of nonfiction, although we will cover relevant terms generally related to writing and craft (at times, using fiction to illustrate themI will make such examples clear). Throughout the quarter, our discussions will serve as a springboard for individual work on the two key assignments in each of the previously-mentioned nonfiction forms.


LTWR 100 - SHORT FICTION 
Reading Like a Writer
Instructor: Camille Forbes

In this course, we commit ourselves to studying, discussing, and creating beautiful works of short fiction. First we go to the elegant works of authors present and past for inspiration and instruction, allowing ourselves to be attentive readers. Then we take those golden nuggets, using them to enrich approaches to our writing. In this course, you not only develop your own piece (one completed story will be required), but also focus on being a student and critic (in the very best sense) of the work of others.  


LTWR 101 - WRTG FICTION IN SPANISH 
Instructor: Cristina Rivera-Garza

This workshop is an interactive forum in which writers, aware of the bilingual nature of our experience as dwellers of one of the most active borders of the globe, are invited to engage with a range of literary traditions as we move with ease from the realm of theory to the most concrete aspects of the writing craft. This is not a class about or around the “purity of” or the “mastery over” Spanish, but rather a course in which your critical relationship with Spanish and its connections with English will play a major role in a hands-on border experience with the making of contemporary texts. Required readings include books of poetry, short fiction, and novels in Spanish (some of them have been already published in English). 


LTWR 104B - THE NOVELLA II 
Instructor: Melvyn Freilicher

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWR 115 - EXPERIMENTAL WRITING
Weird Speculations – After The End
 
Instructor: Anna Joy Springer

Speculative literature requires writers to create works of conjecture rather than knowledge – to think experimentally – to imagine futuristic, fantastical, and even supernatural worlds and situations.  But “Weird Speculations” pay equal attention to the ways language, narrative structure, poetics, page performance, and method (of writing) perform the ideas we’re staging in our writing. The course will combine generative workshop and lecture/discussion approaches, and there will be a critical paper requirement in addition to bi-weekly literary art projects. Most of the texts you’ll read are written in prose form, but you will also be reading and creating other genres. All of the end-of-a-world texts for this course emphasize the re-imagining of history; likewise, course participants will use both historical research and techniques of weird speculation to develop experimental post-apocalyptic works.

Course Texts:

The Comical Tragedy and Tragical Comedy of Mr. Punch by Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean
Riddley Walker by Russell Hoban
The Host (a monster movie) by Baek Chul-hyun and Bong Joon-ho (I will provide this)
Dawn by Octavia Butler
Zong!  By M. Nourbese Phillip
+ essays from The Science Fiction Handbook, Afrofuturisms, and other sources
+  2-3 books of your choice about one historical event


LTWR 122 - WRITING FOR THE SCIENCES 
Instructor: John Granger

This course is designed for the writing major who wants to write about science or nature, and for the science major who wants to write for laypeople, or would like to improve his/her writing skills.  Classes alternate from workshops (Thursdays) to lectures and discussions of the readings, and whatever else arises (Tuesdays).  Required work and grade breakdown: weekly writing exercises from Joseph M. Williams, Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace, 10th ed. (10%); workshop performance (40%); and a ten-page term project begun second week (50%). 


LTWR 124 - TRANSLATION OF LIT TXTS WKSHOP 
Memoir
Instructor: Ari Heinrich

An intensive writing workshop on translating memoir broadly defined.  In this workshop students will not only examine questions of translation raised by Benjamin and other theorists, but produce by the end of the quarter a 20-25 page polished sample draft of a translated chapter or fragment from a memoir.  Students will critique each other’s work and give presentations on problems specific to rendering works from their source language into English.  Prerequisite:  bilingual fluency in English and any source language.  Please contact the instructor if you have an questions about the prerequisite.


LTWR 126 - CREATIVE NONFIC WKSHOP 
Travel Writing
Instructor: John Granger

In this writing workshop we’ll be reading a number of short travel narratives written by Ryszard Kapuscinski, Rory Stewart, Jules Verne, Charles Baudelaire, Elias Canetti, and lots of other writers.  Classes alternate from workshop (Thursdays) to discussion of the readings, and whatever else arises (Tuesdays).  You’ll be asked to compose twenty pages of new travel writing.  Not from memory: you’ll have to really travel somewhere.  You can travel here.