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Literature Undergraduate Course Descriptions Fall 2016


LTCH 101 - READINGS IN CONTEMPORARY CHINESE LITERATURE
Instructor: Ari Heinrich

This course will look at examples of women's autobiography and memoir from China and Taiwan.  Reading at least one novel every week, plus discussion.  Students will be asked to produce writing of their own in the style of individual authors.


LTCS 50 - INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL STUDIES
Instructor: Daisuke Miyao

This course is an introduction to cultural studies with a focus on literary and historical studies, film and media studies, art history, and postcolonial studies.  Particular emphasis is on the question of “cultural practices” and their social and political conditions and effects.  Writings and visual arts (paintings, films, and anime) on Japan will be explored, this course theoretically and historically examines how the culture of Japan was imagined and narrated.


LTCS 87 (A00) - FRESHMAN SEMINAR
Reading Television: American Popular Culture
Instructor: Meg Wesling

This course is an introduction to TV studies.  We will discuss how television shapes our ideas about gender, race, and American identity.  Students will participate in selecting shows to analyze and discuss.


LTCS 87 (B00) - FRESHMAN SEMINAR
Television and American Identity
Instructor: Meg Wesling

This course examines aspects of how TV shapes our perceptions of the world we live in.  We will focus on questions of race, gender, and sexuality in popular media and politics.  Students will participate in selecting shows to analyze and discuss.


LTCS 173 - TOPICS IN VIOLENCE AND VISUAL CULTURE
Violence Onscreen
Instructor: Winifred Woodhull

This course will focus on films from different cultures dealing with various forms of violence deployed in a range of contexts including war, genocide, the criminal justice and prison systems, racial and ethnic conflicts, class conflict, and gender-based violence (for example, sexual assault in the military and physical/sexual/psychological abuse in personal relationships and in society at large).  We will also consider deliberate, strategic violations of social norms and artistic conventions as means of protesting violence and repression.  Depending on online availability at the time the course begins, films may include Stephen Frears, Dirty Pretty Things (UK 2002) on immigrants and people of color in England; Steve McQueen, Hunger (UK/Ireland, 2008) on sectarian strife in Ireland and Northern Ireland; Cary Joji Fukunaga, Beasts of No Nation (US, 2015) on civil war in an unnamed West African country; Kimberly Peirce, Boys Don't Cry (US, 1999) on the loves, friendships, and murder of transsexual Brandon Teena; Denis Villeneuve, Incendies [Scorched] (Canada/France, 2010) on civil war in an unnamed Middle Eastern country; Guillermo del Toro, Pan's Labyrinth (Spain/Mexico/US, 2007); Matthew Pillischer, Broken on All Sides (US, 2012) on race and mass incarceration as the new Jim Crow norm; Ridley Scott, Thelma and Louise (US/France, 1991). 

Regular attendance is required for active, ongoing participation in individual presentations, group work, class discussions, and in-class writing exercises.  There will be one midterm exam (short answers and a short essay) and two short (5 page) papers.


LTEA 138 - JAPANESE FILMS
Introduction
Instructor: Daisuke Miyao

This course offers an introduction to the study of post-1945 Japanese cinema.  This course pays close attention to the languages and styles of films as well as the historical and socio-cultural contexts.  The primary goal of this course is to learn how to read formal and historical aspects of films and develop ability to talk about films in critical terms.

LTEA 138 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTEN 21 - INTRODUCTION TO THE LITERATURE OF THE BRITISH ISLES: PRE-1660
Instructor: Daniel Vitkus

This course surveys English literature from the Anglo-Saxon era to the Early Modern period (8TH to 17TH centuries) and introduces students to the university-level study of Medieval and Renaissance culture. We will investigate important literary forms and critical questions that persisted through the centuries, from Old English to Middle English to Early Modern English. Lectures will discuss the assigned readings and their cultural, social, and political contexts while asking students to engage in critical analysis, close reading, and careful interpretation.  At the same time, we will pay attention to the specific artistic techniques and rhetorical strategies (including verse form, symbol, allegory, and figurative language) that shape and enliven these lasting works of art.  Students will learn to appreciate and understand how Medieval and Renaissance cultures were different from our own, but they will also consider how these texts and their authors continue to speak to us today.


LTEN 25 - INTRODUCTION TO THE LITERATURE OF THE UNITED STATES, BEGINNINGS TO 1865
Instructor: Sara Johnson

This course presents a survey of U.S. literature from the pre-colonial period to the years leading up to the Civil War.  We focus on the conflict and collaborations of several “national” cultures as warring British, French and Spanish settlers fought Native populations in what would become the northeast, mid-west and southern United States for control over the continent. From Puritan and Native American oratory, to captivity and travel narratives, to early poetry, novels and periodicals, we engage questions about the very nature of how “literature” and “American” were defined during the period. Texts are supplemented with early maps, popular musical forms such as the Broadway hit Hamilton, and visual images.  Authors studied include Mary Jemison, John Smith, Anne Bradstreet, Ben Franklin, Ann Hutchinson, William Apess, Cabeza de Vaca, Olaudah Equiano, Thomas Jefferson, Leonora Sansay, Susanna Rowson, Herman Melville, and Frederick Douglass.  Special attention is paid to the historical contexts of the revolutionary period, piracy, the rise of slavery, gender roles, and forced Native American removals in a hemispheric context. Attendance in section is mandatory.


LTEN 28 - INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN AMERICAN LITERATURE
Instructor: Erin Suzuki

This survey course gives a broad overview and introduction to some of the major works, themes, and concepts central to the study of Asian American literature. This course will outline some of the artistic movements, debates, and critical concerns that have formulated the production and reception of Asian American literature in the twentieth and twenty-first century. Some of the questions this course will explore include: How do we define Asian American literature? Is Asian American literature ultimately a national or transnational project? And given the diversity of cultures, traditions, and gender roles included within the rubric of “Asian America,” is there a way of speaking about or representing a unified Asian American experience?


LTEN 87 - FRESHMAN SEMINAR
Performing Stand-up Comedy
Instructor: Camille Forbes

Students will study comics, review and create material, and finally, perform a 3-minute set of original material before an audience (size of audience to be determined).


LTEN 107 - CHAUCER (a)
The Canterbury Tales
Instructor: Lisa Lampert-Weissig

What was it like to live in the Middle Ages? We will explore this question through Chaucer’s masterpiece The Canterbury Tales.  Our examination of The Canterbury Tales will explore its historical, cultural and literary contexts.  Special attention will also be paid to issues of gender and sexuality and how they inflect Chaucer’s poetics and politics, as well as to the role of Christianity in Chaucer’s works.  There is only one required text, Jill Mann’s Penguin paperback edition of The Canterbury Tales (ISBN: 978-0140422344).  Please bring it to class on the first day so we can jump into the text immediately. For more information visit www.medievallit.org.


LTEN 124 - TOPICS: THE NINETEENTH CENTURY (b)
Instructor: Margaret Loose

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTEN 127 - VICTORIAN POETRY (b)
Instructor: Margaret Loose

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTEN 130 - MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE (b)
City, Countryside, Colony
Instructor: Ameeth Vijay

This course considers twentieth and twenty-first century British literature as refracted through spaces fictive and real, among them the sprawling city, the disappearing countryside, and the global expanse of empire.   The title of this course plays on Raymond Williams' The Country and the City, but adds a third term, the colony, as a means of reframing center-periphery and urban-provincial relationships.  In addition, this course finds that the metropole itself contains and creates centers and peripheries. Thus several of the texts disarticulate the space of the city to reveal its complexity and unevenness. Visual material or short secondary readings may be introduced in class so that we may study relevant historical contexts. Throughout we will consider matrices of race, sexuality, and class especially as they relate to shifting understandings of space in a Britain that is at once postcolonial and neoliberal.


LTEN 149 - TOPICS: ENGLISH-LANGUAGE LITERATURE (d)
Survey of Native American and Indigenous Literature
Instructor: Kathyrn Walkiewicz

This course examines key issues in the field of Indigenous literary studies. We will read work from an array of authors whose writings span hundreds of years and cover multiple geographic regions and Indigenous affiliations. Driving our discussion of these texts are a set of key questions: What is Indigenous literature? How does it differ from other genres? What is the value in thinking about Indigenous literature as a specific canon or body of writing? The course will include fiction, poetry, film, and nonfiction prose produced by Indigenous authors (and directors).


LTEN 152 - THE ORIGINS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE (c)
Territory and U.S. Empire in the Literary Imagination
Instructor: Kathyrn Walkiewicz

The early years of the U.S. were marked by continual extension of the nation’s borders. While some argued this growth was inevitable, embracing a belief in U.S. Manifest Destiny, others saw the new nation as an imperial power whose territorial expansion promulgated war, Indian removal, colonization, and the perpetuation of slavery. In this course we will look to late-eighteenth and mid-nineteenth century literature that worked to make sense of this era of extreme geographic rupture. By reading across a wide swath of fiction, poetry, personal essays, and political tracts we will unpack how this moment was understood (and narrated) both by advocates and critics of U.S. territorial expansion.


LTEN 171 - COMPARATIVE ISSUES IN LATINO/A IMMIGRATION IN US LITERATURE
Instructor: Rosaura Sanchez

The course will examine several short naratives and three texts dealing with Mexican and Dominican immigration to the U.S. in the second half of the 20th century.  The texts include the following:  The novelThe River Flows North by Graciela Limón deals with Mexican and Central American undocumented immigrants that cross the Sonoran desert.  The play Real Women Have Curves by Josefina López deals with the conditions Mexican immigrant women face in coming to the U.S. and their work in the garment industry.  The novel Let It Rain Coffee by Angie Cruz deals with Dominican immigrants in New York City and their history back on the island. Students will write two short papers and take a midterm and a final exam.


LTEN 175A - NEW AMERICAN FICTION - POST-WORLD WAR II TO THE PRESENT (d)
Constructing the Body in Literature and Film
Instructor: Meg Wesling

This course examines narratives of bodily self-invention and reinvention in contemporary American literature and film. We will discuss a variety of categories of identity, such as gender, race, sexuality, and disability, and read for the ways in which the body becomes a malleable thing within the cultural narratives that seek to define it. Texts will include late 20th century and early 21st century films (The Danish Girl, Pumping Iron II), novels (by authors such as Jhumpa Lahiri, Jeffrey Eugenides, Octavia Butler, and James Baldwin), and a variety of short fiction and essays. 


LTEN 176 - MAJOR AMERICAN WRITERS (d)
Allen Ginsberg
Instructor: William O'Brien

Allen Ginsberg blew onto the American literary scene with “Howl” in 1955—and onto the political scene a year later, with the Federal Government’s seizure of the book for obscenity.  Ginsberg continued to write until five days before his death in 1997 and was eventually hailed as leader of the Beat writers (a title he dismissed), as a major figure in American poetry, and as a recipient of both the National Book Award (for The Fall of America) and L’Ordre des Arts et Lettres in France.

Virtually an institution, Ginsberg remained controversial throughout his 40-year career.  Openly gay, sexually explicit in his writings, a Communist sympathizer, admitted drug user (until discovering meditation), a former ‘madhouse’ inmate, opponent of the Vietnam war, visionary, mystic, Buddhist, critic of American imperialism—and Soviet imperialism too—he was not always liked. Crowned King of the May Day Parade in Communist Czechoslovakia, he was thrown out of Cuba, chanted for peace at the 1968 Democratic Convention, and sought to ‘levitate’ the Pentagon.

Ginsberg revolutionized American poetry—and the way you think about poetry.  He published 15 books of verse and volumes of essays and journals, gave thousands of public readings.  He also wrote and recorded songs solo, with Bob Dylan, and with a punk band, collaborated on an opera and performances with Philip Glass, and made a video with Glass and Paul McCartney.

Our course will center on Ginsberg’s written poetry, and we will also take into account his recorded poetry, essays, interviews, and music.

Everyone should obtain a copy of Collected Poems 1947-1997 (available at the UCSD Bookstore; not to be confused with Selected Poems 1947-1995).

We begin the first day watching The Life and Times of Allen Ginsberg, Jerry Aronson’s film biography.

Requirements: daily attendance with careful preparation, and three 4-page papers or a final paper.


LTEN 189 - TWENTIETH-CENTURY POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURES
Displacement and Belonging
Instructor: Ameeth Vijay

This courses traces a literary history of global displacement and migration, topics that are once again a concern due the impact of war, poverty, and a changing climate.   Displacement renders the home as a site of loss, but we will also consider how the home can be fantasies of places that never were, or imaginations of a future belonging.  In addition to considering the displacement that results from direct causes, the violence of war for example, we will also think about how colonialism creates historical conditions for migration, and how those historical conditions are represented in literature.  Not everyone experiences the absence of home as a loss, however, and so we will also read narratives of those who are not homesick, but sick of home, and wish to escape it.   Here too, we will will ask how the desire to leave home is connected to the historically constructed fantasy-space of the global metropolis.  Along the way, we will study the legal and technological regimes that have governed global mobility since the first World War, including the impact of international law, transnational governance (e.g. the European Union), trade and military alliances, and identity documents.


LTEU 150C - SURVEY OF RUSSIAN AND SOVIET LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION, 1917-PRESENT
Instructor: Amelia Glaser

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTFR 2A - INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I
Instructor: TA supervised by Catherine Ploye

First course in the intermediate sequence designed to be taken after LIFR1C/CX (If you choose to take LIFR1D/DX, you will still need to take LTFR 2A to continue in the French program). Short stories, cartoons and movies from various French-speaking countries are studied to strengthen oral and written language skills while developing reading competency and cultural literacy. A thorough review of grammar is included. Taught entirely in French. May be applied towards a minor in French literature.


LTFR 2B - INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

Plays from the 19th and 20th centuries as well as movies are studied to strengthen the skills developed in LTFR 2A. Includes a grammar review. Taught entirely in French. May be applied towards a minor in French literature or towards fulfilling the secondary literature requirement.


LTFR 50 - INTERMEDIATE FRENCH III: TEXTUAL ANALYSIS
Instructor: Catherine Ploye

Emphasizes the development of language skills and the practice of textual analysis. Discussions are based on the analysis of various poetic texts (poems, short story, and songs…) and on a film. Taught entirely in French. May be applied towards a minor in French literature or towards fulfilling the secondary literature requirement. Students who have completed 50 can register in upper-level courses (LTFR115 or 116).


LTFR 115 - THEMES IN INTELLECTUAL AND LITERARY HISTORY
France and the world from the Middle Ages to the Eighteenth Century

Instructor: Oumelbanine Zhiri

In this class we will read a number of influential texts that reflect how writers have considered and imagined their relationship to other cultures, such Africa and the Americas. The authors will include Pierre Corneille, Mademoiselle de Scudéry, Voltaire, and others.


LTFR 124 - NINETEENTH CENTURY
Instructor: Winifred Woodhull

Lectures, discussions, and writing assignments will be in French.  This survey of 19th c. literatures in French will consider poetry and prose addressing various themes, including humans' relation to nature and questions of rural and urban ecology; the French Revolution, the revolution of 1848, the Paris Commune, and related literary calls for African, European, and Caribbean men's and women's political and civil rights in France, in the new black Republic of Haiti, and in francophone Louisiana; literary and cultural urban modernity; and historically new understandings and experiences of the individual's inner life as well as his/her social opportunities and constraints (reflections on sexuality, love, labor, yearning, loss, death, the ineluctable passage of time and the ephemeral character of human life).

Authors to be studied include Victor Hugo, Claire de Duras, Armand Lanusse, George Sand, Gustave Flaubert, Charles Baudelaire, Paul Verlaine, Emile Zola.

Regular attendance is required for active, ongoing participation in group work, class discussions, and in-class writing exercises.  There will be individual and group presentations, one midterm exam (short answers and a short essay) and two short (4 page) papers.


LTGK 1 - BEGINNING GREEK
Instructor: Leslie Edwards

Introduction to the grammar of ancient Greek, with readings adapted to this level, including stories taken from Xenophon and Herodotus. This is the first quarter of a three-quarter sequence. Following completion of this sequence (LTGK 1-2-3), students will be equipped to read, in the original Greek, philosophy, drama, history, epic, and the New Testament. They will also be eligible to enroll in upper-division Greek Literature courses. Quizzes, midterm, final. Textbook for the year: Introduction to Greek, 2nd Edition, by Cynthia W. Shelmerdine.


LTGK 104 - GREEK PROSE
Instructor: Page duBois

We will read one of the dialogues of Plato the philosopher. Previous study of ancient Greek is required.


LTGM 2A - INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I
Instructor: Jeannette Mohr

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTGM 101 - GERMAN STUDIES II: NATIONAL IDENTITIES
Instructor: Todd Kontje

What does it mean to be German? How has the nation been defined in the past? In this class we will explore constructions of German national identity from the emergence of national consciousness in the early modern period to today’s multi-cultural Germany. Readings and class discussions of literary works, films, and essays will be in German. Prerequisite: completion of German 2C or the equivalent. Please contact the instructor if you have questions. (Todd Kontje tkontje@ucsd.edu )


LTIT 2A - INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I
Instructor: Adriana De Marchi Gherini

A second-year course in Italian language and literature. This course is part of a 3-course series that prepares students for UCSD Education Abroad Programs in Italy, and the first step towards proficiency in Italian. Conversation, reading, writing, grammar review, movies, music and acting are all parts of this course, which meets 4 times a week.


LTIT 100 - INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURES IN ITALIAN
Brevi gialli italiani
Instructor: Adriana De Marchi Gherini

In Italiano 100 ci sono misteri da svelare, omicidi e sparizioni da risolvere!!  Leggeremo brevi racconti "gialli" scritti da autori della nuova generazione di giallisti italiani, Antonio Manzini, Francesco Recami, Marco Malvaldi e Gian Mauro Costa, senza però dimenticarci del "veterano" Andrea Camilleri.

Ogni studente dovrà scrivere e presentare un breve racconto investigativo.

Corso interamente in italiano, LTIT 100 può essere frequentato 3 volte per credit, se il soggetto non si ripete (e non si ripete!).


LTKO 1A - BEGINNING KOREAN: FIRST YEAR I
Instructor: TAs supervised by Jeyseon Lee

First year Korean 1A (5 units) is the first part of the Beginning Korean series. This course is designed to assist students to develop low-beginning level skills in the Korean language. These skills are speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as cultural understanding. This course will begin by introducing the writing and sound system of the Korean language. The remainder of the course will focus on grammatical patterns such as basic sentence structures, some grammatical points, and expressions. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following in Korean: 

SpeakingStudents are able to handle successfully a limited number of uncomplicated communicative tasks by creating with the language in straightforward social situation. Conversation is restricted to some of the concrete exchanges and predictable topics necessary for survival in the target-language culture. They can express personal meaning by combining and recombining what they know and what they hear from their interlocutors into short statements and discrete sentences.
Listening
Students are able to understand some information from sentence-length speech, one utterance at a time, in basic personal and social contexts, though comprehension is often uneven.
Reading
Students are able to understand some information from the simplest connected texts dealing with a limited number of personal and social needs, although there may be frequent misunderstandings.
Writing
Students are able to meet some limited practical writing needs. They can create statements and formulate questions based on familiar material. Most sentences are re-combinations of learned vocabulary and structure.


LTKO 1C - BEGINNING KOREAN: FIRST YEAR III
Instructor: TAs supervised by Jeyseon Lee

First Year Korean 1C (5 units) is the third part of the Beginning Korean. This course is designed to assist students to develop high-beginning level skills in the Korean language. These skills are speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as cultural understanding. LTKO 1C is designed for students who have already mastered LTKO 1B or who are already in the equivalent proficiency level. This course will focus on grammatical patterns such as sentence structures, some simple grammatical points, and some survival level use of Korean language. Additionally, speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension will all be emphasized, with special attention to oral speech. Upon completion of this course, students will become able to do the following in Korean: 

SpeakingStudents are able to converse with ease and confidence when dealing with the routine tasks and social situations. They are able to handle successfully uncomplicated tasks and social situations requiring an exchange of basic information. They can narrate and describe in all major time frames using connected discourse of paragraph length, but not all the time.
Listening
Students are able to understand, with ease and confidence, simple sentence-length speech in basic personal and social contexts. They can derive substantial meaning from some connected texts, although there often will be gaps in understanding due to a limited knowledge of the vocabulary and structure of the spoken language.
Reading
Students are able to understand fully and with ease short, non-complex texts that convey basic information and deal with personal and social topics to which they brings personal interest or knowledge. They are able to understand some connected texts featuring description and narration although there will be occasional gaps in understanding due to a limited knowledge of the vocabulary, structures, and writing conventions of the language.
Writing
Students are able to meet all practical writing needs of the basic level. They also can write compositions and simple summaries related to work and/or school experiences. They can narrate and describe in different time frames when writing about everyday events and situations.


LTKO 2A - INTERMEDIATE KOREAN: SECOND YEAR I
Instructor: TAs supervised by Jeyseon Lee

Second Year Korean 2A is the first part of the Intermediate Korean. Students in this course are assumed to have previous knowledge of Korean, which was taught in the Korean 1A, 1B, and 1C courses. Students in this course will learn low-intermediate level skills in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Korean, as well as expand their cultural understanding. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to acquire and use more vocabularies, expressions and sentence structures and to have a good command of Korean in various conversational situations. Students are expected to write short essays using the vocabularies, expressions, and sentence structures introduced. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following in Korean:

SpeakingStudents are able to handle a variety of communicative tasks. They are able to participate in most informal and some formal conversations on topics related to school, home, and leisure activities. Students demonstrate the ability to narrate and describe in the major time frames in paragraph-length discourse. They show the ability  to combine and link sentences into connected discourse of paragraph length.
Listening
Students are able to understand short conventional narrative and descriptive texts with a clear underlying structure though their comprehension may uneven. They understand the main facts and some supporting details. Comprehension may often derive primarily from situation and subject-matter knowledge.
Reading
Students are able to understand conventional narrative and descriptive texts with a clear underlying structure though their comprehension may be uneven. These texts predominantly contain high-frequency vocabulary and structure. Students understand the main ideas and some supporting details. Comprehension may often derive primarily from situational and subject-matter knowledge.
Writing
Students are able to meet basic work and/or academic writing needs. They are able to compose simple summaries on familiar topics. They are able to combine and link sentences into texts of paragraph length and structure. They demonstrate the ability to incorporate a limited number of cohesive devices.


LTKO 3 - ADVANCED KOREAN: THIRD YEAR
Instructor: Jeyseon Lee

Third Year Korean 3 (5 units) is the first part of the advanced Korean. Students in this course are assumed to have previous knowledge of Korean, which was taught in the Korean 2A, 2B, and 2C courses. Students in this course will learn low-advanced level skills in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Korean, as well as expand their cultural understanding. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to acquire and use more vocabularies, expressions and sentence structures and to have a good command of Korean in formal situations. Students are expected to read and understand daily newspapers and daily news broadcasts. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following in Korean:

SpeakingStudents are able to communicate with accuracy and fluency in order to participate fully and effectively in conversations on a variety of topics in formal and informal settings from both concrete and abstract perspectives. They discuss their interests and special fields of competence, explain complex matters in detail, and provide lengthy and coherent narrations, all with ease, fluency, and accuracy. They present their opinions on a number of issues of interest to them, and provide structured arguments to support these opinions.
Listening
Students are able to understand speech in a standard dialect on a wide range of familiar and less familiar topics. They can follow linguistically complex extended discourse. Comprehension is no longer limited to the listener's familiarity with subject matter, but also comes from a command of the language that is supported by a broad vocabulary, an understanding of more complex structures and linguistic experience within the target culture. Students can understand not only what is said, but sometimes what is left unsaid.
Reading
Students are able to understand texts from many genres dealing with a wide range of subjects, both familiar and unfamiliar. Comprehension is no longer limited to the reader's familiarity with subject matter, but also comes from a command of the language that is supported by a broad vocabulary, an understanding of complex structures and knowledge of the target culture. Students at this level can draw inferences from textual and extralinguistic clues.
Writing
Students are able to produce most kinds of formal and informal correspondence, in-depth summaries, reports, and research papers. They demonstrate the ability to explain complex matters, and to present and support opinions by developing cogent arguments and hypotheses. They demonstrate a high degree of control of grammar and syntax, of general vocabulary, of spelling or symbol production, of cohesive devices, and of punctuation.


LTKO 100 - READINGS IN KOREAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE
Readings in Modern Korean Literature
Instructor: Jin-kyung Lee

This course is a survey of key historical issues in modern Korea from 1920s to the present.  We will read major authors from the colonial period and from the post-Liberation era South Korea. We will also screen several canonical films that deal with the issues treated by literary works. We will examine broader social issues as represented by literature and film such as the changing colonial state policies, the ideological struggle between bourgeois nationalists and Marxists, national division, the U.S./Soviet occupation, the Korean War, authoritarian rule, industrialization, and labor/agrarian movements. This course is designed both as an advanced reading class and as an introduction to Korean literature, culture and history.  Students who have completed three years of Korean at the college level as well as those who have literacy in Korean through informal and formal training may qualify to take this class.

LTKO 100 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTLA 1 (A00) - BEGINNING LATIN
Instructor: Leslie Edwards

Introduction to the grammar of Latin. This is the first quarter of a three-quarter sequence (LTLA 1-2-3), during which we’ll work our way through our charming and witty textbook (stay tuned for more information about that!) .  There will be some homework, due at every class meeting, consisting of exercises meant to reinforce the fundamentals of syntax and grammar. There will be regular quizzes, a midterm and a final.


LTLA 1 (B00) - BEGINNING LATIN
Instructor: Eliot Wirshbo

If you're reading this, you're already one of the elite few at UCSD who regard the study of a language and the study of Language as potentially rewarding, even if the reward is accompanied by a certain amount of suffering. So congratulations on your perspicacity and also on your rare providence, not to mention your lack of puerility. (These are all terms which an elementary student can figure out after a short acquaintance with Latin.)

The large-scale incorporation of Latin words into English half a millennium or so ago makes this sequence valuable for the student who wants to enlarge his or her vocabulary. Another important by-product of the study of Latin is a fuller sense of the way metaphors develop without the aid of poetic shapers, as when the apprehending of a criminal and a prehensile tail coalesce in the mental grasping known as comprehension. But apart from all the informational stuff, this course and sequence constitute a good, old-fashioned challenge of a sort that's enlightening and uplifting. Some have even seen it as the best way of molding youthful minds for the intellectual life ahead of them. And some of those are the proprietors of the youthful minds themselves.


LTLA 100 - INTRODUCTION TO LATIN LITERATURE
Instructor: Eliot Wirshbo

A course that includes a review of grammar, perusal of exciting stories revelatory of Roman mores, discussion of etymological wonders, and inculcation of some basic principles of Latin composition. (In + calco + tio: into + stomp + noun suffix … but it will of course be a gentle stomping.) The aim, somewhat paradoxically given the eagerness of most students to escape from Latin as soon as they possibly can, is to prepare students for reading at a more advanced level. Slogging through the readings in this course should raise the confidence-level of potential continuators in the language. And imminent departers from Latin will, it is hoped, gain something from the rigorous discipline required to piece out meanings from challenging sentences. But all will find the stories both edifying and wondrous.


LTLA 104 - LATIN PROSE
Seneca's "de Brevitate Vitae"

Instructor: Eliot Wirshbo

Upper-division Latin students, it's not too early to do your end-of-life planning, and what better adviser could you choose to pilot your ship/self through the shoals and reefs of your final years than ol' Seneca (the Younger)? In this upbeat guide to what's really important in life (or its end), you'll peruse fascinating bits of advice on how to prioritize end-of-life tasks, what to hold onto and what to let go of, which friends to trust, where some of the greatest pitfalls lie, etc. Seneca's wisdom is only available to the elite few who have passed through Latin III (= Intermediate Latin II), which means that most UCSD students will spend their lives wondering what to do in around seventy years. Sign up now for a spot on this exclusive tour of an old Stoic's picks and pans regarding eschatological options. Refreshments will be served, usual course niceties will be observed (paper, mid-term, final, daily translations).


LTRU 1A - FIRST-YEAR RUSSIAN
Instructor: Rebecca Wells

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTRU 2A - SECOND-YEAR RUSSIAN
Instructor: Rebecca Wells

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTRU 104B - ADVANCED PRACTICUM IN RUSSIAN
Instructor: Rebecca Wells

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTRU 110C - SURVEY OF RUSSIAN AND SOVIET LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION, 1917-PRESENT
Instructor: Amelia Glaser

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTSP 2A - INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I: FOUNDATIONS
Instructor: TAs supervised by Beatrice Pita

This 5 unit intermediate course meets 4 days per week and is taught entirely in Spanish. LTSP 2A emphasizes the development of communicative skills, reading ability, listening comprehension and writing skills. It includes grammar review, short readings, class discussions and working with Spanish-language video and Internet materials. This course is designed to prepare students for LTSP 2B and 2C. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisites: Completion of LISP 1C/CX, its equivalent, or a score of 3 on the AP Spanish language exam.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2A is scheduled for SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3rd, 2016.

Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with  any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 2B - INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II: READINGS AND COMPOSITION
Instructor: TAs supervised by Beatrice Pita

This intermediate course is designed for students who wish to improve their grammatical competence, ability to speak, read and write Spanish. It is a continuation of LTSP 2A with special emphasis on problems in writing and interpretation. Students meet with the instructor 4 days per week. Work for this 5 unit course includes oral presentations, grammar review, writing assignments, class discussions on the readings and work with Spanish-language video and Internet materials. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisites: Completion of LTSP 2A, its equivalent, or a score of 4 on the AP Spanish language exam.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2B is scheduled for SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3rd, 2016.

Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with  any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 2C - INTERMEDIATE SPANISH III: CULTURAL TOPICS AND COMPOSITION
Instructor: TAs supervised by Beatrice Pita

The goal of this intermediate language course is twofold: to further develop all skill areas in Spanish and to increase Spanish language-based cultural literacy. LTSP 2C is a continuation of the LTSP second-year sequence with special emphasis on problems in grammar, writing and translation. It includes class discussions of cultural topics as well as grammar review and composition assignments. The course will further develop the ability to read articles, essays and longer pieces of fictional and non-fictional texts as well as the understanding of Spanish-language materials on the Internet. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisite: Completion of LTSP 2B, its equivalent, or a score of 5 on the AP Spanish language exam. This course satisfies the third course requirement of the college-required language sequence as well as the language requirement for participation in UC-EAP.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2C is scheduled for SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3rd, 2016.

Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with  any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 2D - INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED SPANISH: SPANISH FOR BILINGUAL SPEAKERS
Instructor: Beatrice Pita

Designed for bilingual students who have been exposed to Spanish at home but have little or no formal training in Spanish. The goal is for students who are comfortable understanding, reading and speaking in Spanish to further develop existing skills and to acquire greater oral fluency, and grammatical control  through grammar review, and reading and writing practice. Building on existing strengths, the course will allow students  to develop a variety of Spanish language strategies to express themselves in Spanish with greater ease and precision. Prepares native-speakers for  more advanced courses. A diagnostic test will be administered on the first day. Prerequisite: Native speaking ability and/or recommendation of instructor.

Note: The Final Exam for LTSP 2D is scheduled for SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3rd, 2016.

Enrollment for LTSP 2D requires department pre-authorization; contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with  any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 50A - READINGS IN PENINSULAR LITERATURE
Instructor: TAs supervised by Beatrice Pita

This course introduces students to Peninsular literature and literary analysis through the close textual reading of a selection of texts including novels, plays, short fiction and poetry. Coursework includes reading of several texts by Spanish authors, participation in class discussions, oral presentations and written assignments. LTSP 50A prepares Literature majors and minors for upper-division work. Two courses from the LTSP 50ABC series (any two) are required for Spanish Literature majors. May be applied towards a minor in Spanish Literature or towards fulfilling the second literature requirement for Literature majors. Prerequisites: Completion of LTSP 2C, 2D, 2E or 2 years of college level Spanish. 

Notes: The Final Exam for LTSP 50A is scheduled for SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3rd, 2016.

Contact instructor (bpita@ucsd.edu) with  any questions regarding placement.


LTSP 137 - CARIBBEAN LITERATURE
Instructor: Rosaura Sanchez

The course will focus on two Cuban and one Puerto Rican novel and some short stories.  The novel Maldito amor by Rosario Ferré will provide a historical overview of Puerto Rican history and colonization.  The novel Como un mensajero tuyo by Mayra Montero will explore Chinese immigration to the Caribbean, the practice of santería in Cuba, and a love plot with a famous opera singer.  The third novel, Adiós Hemingway, by Leonardo Padura is a detective novel that looks back on Hemingway's residence in Cuba.  Students will write two short papers and take a mid term and a final exam.


LTSP 138 - CENTRAL AMERICAN LITERATURE
Literatura Centroamericana hasta 1990
Instructor: Milos Kokotovic

En este curso analizaremos representaciones literarias de los conflictos étnicos y políticos del siglo XX en Centroamérica. Empezaremos con el Popol Vuh, el libro sagrado de los Quiché Maya y analizaremos como Miguel Angel Asturias utilizó algunos de los temas y preocupaciones de este texto Maya siglos después en su novela Hombres de maíz (1949).  Seguiremos con poesía, cuentos, testimonios y novelas escritos entre los 1960s y los 1990s, durante las guerras revolucionarias.  Analizaremos como varios autores usaron la literatura tanto para representar estos conflictos como para tomar parte en ellos.  Aparte del Popol Vuh y Hombres de maíz, leeremos obras de autores como Claribel Alegría, Manlio Argueta, Gioconda Belli, Ernesto Cardenal, Roque Dalton, Rigoberta Menchú, y Sergio Ramírez.

LTSP 138 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTSP 140 - LATIN AMERICAN NOVEL
Instructor: Jaime Concha

El curso tratara de novelas breves ( novellae, o nouvelles) latinoamericanas, todas muy recientes, de fines de siglo o del actual.

Los temas principales serán las cuestiones sociales y políticas más candentes que viven países como Colombia, Venezuela, Chile, Argentina y Uruguay.

Dos exámenes, uno intermedio, otro final.


LTSP 172 - INDIGENISTA THEMES IN LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE
Instructor: Gloria Chacon

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWL 19A - INTRODUCTION TO THE ANCIENT GREEKS AND ROMANS
Archaic Greece
Instructor: Leslie Edwards

This interdisciplinary sequence (LTWL 19A, B, C) features the literature, mythology, history, and philosophy of ancient Greece and Rome, complex civilizations that had a determining influence on all later Western culture. In 19A we'll focus on Greece from the time of the Homeric poems to Aeschylus in the early fifth century. We shall read texts of the period as expressions of an aristocratic culture which placed emphasis on war and athletics and whose economies, educational systems, sexual politics, ethics and theology were shaped by this emphasis. The debt owed by archaic Greek literature to other Mediterranean civilizations will also be explored. This sequence partially fulfills lower division requirements for the Literatures of the World major/minor, the Classical Studies major/minor and the Warren College program in Classical Studies. There will be a midterm, final, and paper.


LTWL 114 - CHILDREN'S LITERATURE
The Golden Age
Instructor: Stephen Potts

This course surveys the development of children’s literature from  early French and German fairy tales to the end of the so-called Golden Age around World War I. Representative readings include the original versions of “Cinderella,” “Snow White,” and “The Little Mermaid” and classic books like Alice in Wonderland, The Wizard of Oz, and Peter Pan. As well as analyzing these works for their literary and cultural value, we will trace the social construction of childhood from the Enlightenment to the early twentieth century. Follow the Yellow Brick Road, and the Great Oz may give you a diploma too.


LTWL 124 - SCIENCE FICTION
The Future Today
Instructor: Stephen Potts

Science fiction blossomed during its Golden Age in the 1940s and 50s, and from then to the Millenium continued to expand in sophistication and popularity. Over that period the genre set many of its future visions, for better or worse, in the twenty-first century. Now that we are a decade and a half into that century, what does today’s science fiction say about the future . . . or the present?  In this course we will explore the contemporary genre in fiction and other media (film, TV, etc.) with particular emphasis on its themes, techniques, and ongoing evolution. We will feature the work of living, award-winning authors, some of whom have already agreed to visit the class. Join us and meet the future.


LTWL 150 - MODERNITY AND LITERATURE
German Modernism
Instructor: Todd Kontje

Literature in German experienced one of its most productive and distinguished periods in the early twentieth century. In this course we will read works by such authors as Thomas Mann, Franz Kafka, Robert Musil, and Hermann Hesse, while delving briefly into the silent film of the era. Readings and class discussion are in English, although students fluent in German are welcome to read the works in the original.


LTWL 172 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE 
Latin American Narratives of Modernization
Instructor: Milos Kokotovic

In this course we will read three big novels of what has come to be known as the 1960s Boom in Latin American literature: Carlos Fuentes’s The Death of Artemio Cruz (México, 1962), Nobel Prize winner Mario Vargas Llosa’s The Green House (Perú, 1966), and Nobel Prize winner Gabriel García Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude (Colombia, 1967). We will analyze these authors’ innovations in narrative form and explore the relationship between such literary modernization and the modernization of the societies in which these novels were produced.  We will ask, that is, what these novels had to do with the rise of the mass media, the expansion of educational systems and reading publics, the confrontation between processes of modernization and traditional cultures, and the revolutionary movements which sprang up throughout Latin America in the wake of the Cuban revolution (1959). Since these and other novels of the Boom helped to put Latin American literature on the global literary map, we will also discuss their enduring appeal beyond Latin America. In addition to our three primary texts, we may also read some critical and historical articles which will help us decipher the novels.

LTWL 172 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.


LTWL 176 - LITERATURE AND IDEAS
What is Healthy Aging?
Instructor: Stephanie Jed

For the first time in the history of any major university in the U.S., the Schools of Medicine, Engineering, Management, and Pharmacy as well as the Divisions of Biological Sciences, Social Sciences, and Arts & Humanities, along with major Institutes on Aging, Engineering, Technology, and Neurosciences at UC San Diego, have come together to launch a new Initiative for Promoting Healthy Aging. It will include innovative projects in cross-campus, multi-professional, collaborative research, education, and partnerships with the community, industry, and state and county agencies.

Examining a range of texts that explore aging in science and technology, social sciences, literature and film, students will have the opportunity to explore the importance of culture in research and science careers in the field of healthy aging.


LTWL 180 - FILM STUDIES AND LITERATURE: FILM HISTORY
Neorealism in a Global Context

Instructor: Pasquale Verdicchio

ITALIAN NEOREALISM was not a truly organized movement and had a rather short life.  However, the so-called movement deeply influenced directors and film traditions around the world. This course will consider the impact of Italian neorealism beyond the period of 1945–1952, its beginning and end, and beyond its own national and cultural borders and “intentions”. Neorealist filmmakers developed innovative and engaging narrative techniques that sought to bring to the foreground social issues and a redefinition of national identity. Beginning with Italian neorealist films we will then move on to view productions from India, Brazil, Africa, Hong Kong and the United States among others. We will explore neorealism’s complex relationship to its matrix and to the various national film traditions styles, and historical periods in which it manifests, in order to ascertain its impact and the ways that it continues to complicate the relationship between ideas of nation, national cinema, and national identity.

 LTWL 180 will fulfill Literature/World major’s non-European/non-U.S. requirement.
 LTWL 180 is an LTEN equivalent course
.


LTWL 194 - CAPSTONE COURSE FOR LIT MAJORS
Instructor: Pasquale Verdicchio

An advanced seminar open to all Literature majors in their senior year.  Required for those interested in the Honors Program.  It offers an integrative experience by considering key facets of the discipline, including literature theories/historiography, knowledge of neighboring disciplines, relevance of literature/cultural studies in various professions outside of academia.


LTWR 8A - WRITING FICTION
Instructor: Melvyn Freilicher

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWR 8B - WRITING POETRY
Instructor: Brandon Som

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWR 100 (A00) - SHORT FICTION WORKSHOP
Flash Fiction
Instructor: Camille Forbes

In this course, you will study the compressed short fiction form known as “flash fiction”: stories from 500-1000 words in length. The class will read published pieces, taking them as points of inspiration as we engage deeply in discussion and delve into in-class exercises as well as writing assignments. Students will be required to write, edit, format, and submit one of their stories for publication in “Flash Fiction Online."


LTWR 102 - POETRY WORKSHOP
Instructor: Brandon Som

Please contact instructor for course description.


LTWR 120 - PERSONAL NARRATIVE WORKSHOP
Memoir
Instructor: Camille Forbes

In this course, you will study, discuss, and create shapely memoir essays. The class will devote time to study of the form, reading elegant works of authors present and past for inspiration, while being attentive readers. Then you will utilize that material to enrich your own writing.


LTWR 121 - MEDIA WRITING WORKSHOP
MAGAZINE FEATURE WRITING
Instructor: Melvyn Freilicher

The chief project involves conceiving of a print or on-line arts and culture magazine that you would like to publish.  This might have a particular focus (film, music, literature, pop culture, TV, computer games) or it could cover a wide range of genres, and issues: social, cultural, entertainment, lifestyle, sports, education, food. Your approach might fall anywhere on the spectrum of rivalling established slick, mainstream publications to more experimental or specialized alternatives; periodicals for particular subcultures, age groups, geographical regions; zines. In all cases, take the high road: aim for originality and intellectual quality. Your project will consist of writing sections of the premier issue: a major feature article which will include interviews and research. Also a manifesto or Letter from the Editor introducing the first issue and the magazine’s concept; an annotated Table of Contents. (You’ll also write a statement of the magazine’s intended demographics and audience:  not for publication.) First drafts of these projects will be read and discussed by everyone in the class, and you’ll provide written critiques for many of these drafts. Revised projects will be due finals week. We’ll read and analyze articles from a variety of recent publications, like the New Yorker, Atlantic, Mother Jones, and others. There will be short reading quizzes at the beginning of those classes.


LTWR 126 - CREATIVE NONFICTION WORKSHOP
Wild Atlas: Travel Writing

Instructor: John Granger

We’ll begin with and revisit Richard Thompson’s Travel Writing (Routledge: New Critical Idiom)—the Imperious ‘I’ and the Other.”

Narcissus didn’t travel. He stayed where he could see himself reflected in a pond. In this writing workshop we shall read new lively, wild travel writing written on top of disturbed, larger surfaces, without anchors (cf. Rimbaud’s “Le Bateau ivre”)—still reflective.

Why go anywhere? Classes alternate from workshop (Thursdays) to discussion of the readings, and whatever else arises (Tuesdays).  You’ll be asked to compose ten pages of new travel writing. Not from memory: you’ll really have to go somewhere. It’s open. Grade breakdown: workshop performance (50%): ten-page term project (50%).


LTWR 148 - THEORY FOR WRITERS/WRITING FOR THEORY
Theory for Writers

Instructor: John Granger

This course proposes an alliance among philosophy, literary theory and creative writing as differently ordered responses to the set of all problems confronting us.  We’ll read theory to generate thought, play, and writing. Course requirements & grade breakdown: four writing exercises; your own writing project conceived in response to the theory we’re reading (ten pages), accompanied by an explanatory note (five pages) [50%]; workshop (50%); reading quizzes; attendance.


LTWR 194 - CAPSTONE COURSE FOR WRITING MAJORS
Advanced Literary Praxis

Instructor: Ben Doller

“We should never speak of our memory, for it is anything but ours; it works on its own terms, it assists us while deceiving us or perhaps deceives us to assist us.” 
–Julio Cortázar

Despite Cortázar’s fair warning, in this capstone course we will interrogate the concept of memory as it has been represented and performed in a variety of written works. Is writing itself a synonym for memory? We will consider the evolving concept of memory in contemporary and historical writing practice. We will engage with archived literary projects, examining process, residue marginalia, and editing (aka forgetting?) as a way to explore our own creative practices. Through in-class conversations with contemporary writers, we will address praxis around memory as writing, and we will write and discuss our own literary works, developing a critical and creative community—along with an awareness of the contemporary literary landscape­­—that will help sustain our written work into the future.